March 12, 2000

April 12th, 2011 by JJ

12 March 2000
7:30 – 8:50am

Present: Crangle, Wixson, Wilhelm, Flack, Kent, Moore, Rorke, Hage, Barry, McCahan, Campbell, Fogleman, Mathis, Fahey, Lindberg, Lessard, Jeffrey, Freyhofer, Ramsay, Landry, Huckins.

The minutes from the February 26th meeting were reviewed and accepted as written.

Ed Wixson welcomed members of the University Planning Committee to the meeting. The CPC came to formally present the updated Strategic Plan and budget priorities to the CBC for action. Copies of the new plan and priorities were sent to all members of both committees prior to this meeting.

Following introductions, Barbara McCahan, Chair of the CPC, explained the format of the updated plan and gave some background on its development.

Bill Crangle explained the other handouts; the President’s report to the CPC concerning strategic priorities, and the recommendations from the CPC regarding those priorities. Each VP incorporated the individual plans of their departments into a division plan, which was then presented to Dr. Wharton, who then compiled that information into his summary and list of priorities.

Dick Hage underlined the importance of seeing—and understanding—the big picture. The CBC has a responsibility to understand the priorities within the plan and to match the available resources to them.

Lengthy discussion followed on with whom the ultimate decisions rest. Who should judge what is important? Many of the priorities presented today cannot be funded without something else making way for them.

It was agreed that the work of the Curriculum Committee should be closely aligned with the strategic plan.

The CPC members adjourned at 8:35.

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