Note from the Director

September 10th, 2012 by CfRP

Dear Friends,

 

I hope the end of summer finds you well. As many of you know, on August 1 the Center for Rural Partnerships began a new era, with Thad Guldbrandsen moving on to become the Vice Provost for Research and Engagement. I’d like to congratulate Thad, and thank him for his leadership of the Center over the past 6 years. He has left the woodpile well-stocked, and all of us at the Center are inspired to continue his legacy of developing and supporting collaborative projects with Plymouth State’s many partners throughout the region.

 

At any time of transition, it’s important to take stock of past success and chart a course for new areas of achievement. Since its inception in 2005, the Center for Rural Partnerships has become known as a resource for facilitating relationships among community partners, developing workshops and educational opportunities both on-and-off campus, and conducting community-level applied research throughout the region. This is what we do best, and thanks to the vibrancy and hard work of our partners and staff, we will continue to develop and support fruitful partnerships across the fields of history, heritage and culture; health and social welfare; and recreation, tourism, and agriculture. I am excited to continue this work together.

 

Looking forward, I see a number of opportunities for the Center to expand its service to the region. First, we’ll be developing a strategic plan that will allow us to better listen to the needs of our partners and focus on meeting those needs. Second, in keeping with new campus initiatives for student engagement and service learning, the Center will help create a student-focused “rural laboratory” that will create opportunities for students to engage the region by conducting research, working on real-world projects, and applying coursework. Third, the Center will be expanding our communication efforts to better share and promote the collaborative success of our partners. We’ll be updating our web page, creating some visual materials, and expanding our social media presence. Be sure to visit often!

 

So, there’s a lot of work to do and a lot to look forward to. In the meantime, I’d like to leave you with a sample of some exciting projects coming to fruition in the coming months:

 

  • Thanks to the support of the Neil and Louise Tillotson Fund, The Center will be continuing its Coos County Outreach Initiative, which provides technical support, cultural programming, and educational opportunities to businesses, entrepreneurs, and community organizations throughout the North Country.

 

  • With PSU’s College of Business Administration, the Center will be re-introducing the new-and-improved North Country Economic Index, which has been expanded to include new features and in-depth analysis that better serves the region’s policy-makers and economic development stakeholders.

 

  • In partnership with the Institute for New Hampshire Studies and the New Hampshire Department of Travel and Tourism Development, the Center will be co-hosting a tourism-marketing workshop designed to help motel owners create exciting and profitable travel itineraries.

 

  • Along with the Northern Forest Heritage Park and the Plymouth State Art Department, the Center will be organizing several showings of a documentary film detailing the creation and installation of murals on the Brown Company R+D Building.

 

And, thanks to you, there will be plenty more. Keep in touch, and I look forward to seeing you soon.

 

 

Cheers,

 

Ben Amsden

Interim Director

Old Man of the Mountain: Substance and Symbol

March 5th, 2012 by Melissa

Join the Plymouth Historical Society in welcoming Maggie Stier to Pease Public Library on Tuesday, March 13th as she discusses the “Old Man of the Mountain: Substance and Symbol.”

The story of the Old Man of the Mountain is a story of New Hampshire itself, reflecting our history, arts, literature, As the multi-faceted story of this icon unfolds, the audience will be challenged to think about the different and evolving ways that this image has touched the public imagination over its 200 year history.  The presentation will include images of paintings, literary passages, souvenirs, and film clips of interviews with those closest to the Old Man, and conclude with a discussion of current efforts to memorialize the state symbol.

This presentation is made possible through a grant from the New Hampshire Humanities Council and is part of their Humanities to Go! program.

“Re-Wilding of the White Mountains”

February 27th, 2012 by Melissa

Join the Museum of the White Mountains at the Eastern Slope Inn in North Conway on March 7 to welcome photographer Jerry Monkman.  Jerry will talk about the “re-wilding” of the White Mountains as told in his book “White Mountain Wilderness.”

Enjoy free samples from event sponsors Flatbread Pizza and Tuckerman Brewery.

This is the first in a series of programs to raise awareness of the Museum’s membership program.  Please share the event flyer!

 

NEW ARCHAEOLOGY COURSES!

February 14th, 2012 by CfRP

SCRAP stands for the State Conservation and Rescue Archaeology Program and they are offering two new courses!

 

Archaeological Field Methods:  Historical Archaeology at the Roxmont Estate

(2 credits, HS 5630)
Instructor: Tanya Krajcik
Dates: June 4-15 (M-F)
Offered through the State Conservation and Rescue Archaeology Program (SCRAP).  The 2012 summer field school will focus on historic Roxmont estate site on Long Island in Moultonborough, NH.  The field school will feature both seminar and fieldwork components. In the first week of the course, specialists will lead seminars on archaeology, landscape history and design, and historical research and documentation. In the second week, participants will gain field experience by participating in survey, mapping, and excavation at the Roxmont site. Please contact the instructor (tanya.krajcik@dcr.nh.gov) for additional course information.

 

Archaeological Field Methods: Further Investigations at the Jefferson VI Paleoindian Site

Instructor: Dr. Richard A. Boisvert

Dates: June 25 – August 3

The 2012 NH State Conservation and Rescue Archaeology Program (SCRAP) summer field school will continue research at the Jefferson VI Paleoindian site. The investigations will consist of site testing with small block excavations and additional shovel test pit survey on nearby landforms. Participants in the field school will document the site with detailed excavations and place it in a context with other Paleoindian sites in the immediate vicinity and the broader region. They will also have an opportunity to assist with public outreach by presentations to the general public and site tours. Participants will learn fundamental recovery and documentation techniques as well as basic artifact identification and field laboratory procedures. Hands-on instruction in the field will be supplemented by background readings, evening lectures by various affiliated scholars, and field trips to nearby Paleoindian sites.

 

Additional information on the 2012 field school and the State Conservation and Rescue Archaeology Program can be obtained by calling 603-271-6433 or by visiting the SCRAP website at: http://www.nh.gov/nhdhr/SCRAP.htm

Food Safety Education and Planning for Agritourism Webinar Held December 14

December 20th, 2011 by Melissa

CfRP’s Ben Amsden recently collaborated with Lisa Chase and Londa Nwadike, both of UVM Extension, to conduct a “Food Safety Education and Planning for Agritourism” webinar on December 14.

You may access the recorded webinar, PowerPoint slides from the webinar presentation, and more at UVM’s Food Safety for Agritourism Site.  For more information, please contact Ben Amsden at 535- or at blamsden@plymouth.edu. For specific questions about food safety, please contact Londa Nwadike at 802-223-2389 ext. 216 or londa.nwadike@uvm.edu.

New Hampshire Women in Agriculture Conference coming soon

December 20th, 2011 by Melissa

2012 NH Women in Agriculture Conference: Empowering women in Agri-business today
Pre-Registration must be received by January 20, 2012
$10/person pre-registration includes one day pass to the NH Farm & Forest Expo

Hear from a panel of three NH farm women who share their experiences with starting and operating their businesses and how they connect to the land and their communities.
Panelists: Donna Ducharme, Snow Dragon Mountain Farm, Meredith, NH
Mary Boucher, Boucher’s Greenhouse, Litchfield, NH
Renee Cantara, New Roots Farm, Newmarket, NH

This group of panelists each own and operate a value-added business. They take raw agricultural products and make it into something else. Examples to be discussed are
breads, cheeses and beer.
Panelists: Jenny Chartier, Abigail’s Bakery, Goffstown, NH
Jenny Tapper, Via Lactea Farm, Brookfield, NH
Annette Lee, Throwback Brewery, North Hampton, NH

http://www.nh.gov/agric/documents/womeninag.pdf

For more information contact Gail McWilliam Jellie at (603) 271-3788 or gail.mcwilliam.jellie@agr.nh.gov

Food Safety Education and Planning for Agritourism Providers

November 10th, 2011 by Melissa

Food Safety Education and Planning for Agritourism Providers

Webinar
Wednesday, December 14, Noon to 1pm
Free — open to all interested

Hosted by: Lisa Chase, Londa Nwadike, and Ben Amsden
University of Vermont Extension and the Plymouth State University Center for Rural Partnerships

Understanding the latest in food safety is essential for farmers who sell products directly to consumers. This webinar will present the latest in food safety and food-based risk management issues specifically aimed at those involved in agritourism, including u-pick operations, farm stands, CSAs, prepared meals, and other activities where visitors and food come together on a farm. Whether you are a farmer or an Extension educator supporting farmers, the webinar will provide up-to-date information, best practices, and future directions in risk management and food safety in agritourism.

To access the webinar, please follow this link five minutes before the webinar begins:

https://sas.elluminate.com/m.jnlp?sid=2009421&password=M.3979AA011F410B2D15F77266B1F3FD

For technical assistance during the webinar, contact Jessie Schmidt at (866) 860-1382, ext. 203 (Vermont calls only) or (802) 223-2389, ext. 203, E-mail: jessica.a.schmidt@uvm.edu

Contact lisa.chase@uvm.edu, londa.nwadike@uvm.edu or blamsden@plymouth.edu for more information about the webinar.

To request a disability-related accommodation to participate in this program, please let Rose Crossley in UVM Extension (802-223-2389) know by November 14, 2011 so we may assist you.

Funding for this project was provided by the Northeast Center for Risk Management Education and the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture.

 

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Bid Now to Benefit the Northern Forest Canoe Trail!

November 2nd, 2011 by Melissa

The 7th annual online auction benefiting the Northern Forest Canoe Trail is underway!  From now through December 1, visit the NFCT’s online auction page at BiddingForGood, and bid on over 200 paddling-related items–from paddles to PFDs, racks to river tours, and more.

All proceeds go directly to support the mission programs and operations of the Northern Forest Canoe Trail: Stewardship, Economic Development, Connecting People & Place.  The NFCT has a vision for the health, vitality and sustainability of the Northern Forest with the Northern Forest Canoe Trail as a model and lynchpin of how a recrational trail can help anchor vibrant communities, businesses and the region.

PSU Students Named “Young Preservationists” by the NH Preservation Alliance

October 24th, 2011 by CfRP

Photo from the Berlin Daily Sun

October 24, 2011PSU students who participated in the Brown Company Research & Development Building public mural project are being honored as the inaugural recipients of the “Young Preservationists” award from the NH Preservation Alliance.

The Alliance is celebrating its 25th anniversary with a series of events and the institution of this new award intended to honor contributions made by young adults that support, communicate, and highlight important  NH places, innovations, and other artifacts of cultural and historical significance.  The recipients are invited to participate in a number of events over the coming months.  Their specific contributions will be featured and celebrated at these events.

Photo Credit: Kaleb Hart

The mural panels are the high-profile centerpiece of a trio of collaborative projects intended to feature the unique and powerful history of innovation of Brown Company in Berlin, NH.  Comprising twenty-four 4′x8′ painted panels, the exhibit is on display on the street-facing side of the building where it will remain until the restoration is complete.  After that, the panels will move indoors to become a permanent exhibit.

Photo Credit: Kaleb Hart

The mural project came about when Jim Wagner (Northern Forest Heritage Park and Brown Research Building Rehabilitation Project) and DES representative, Keith DuBois, inspected the building and determined that a protective solution to the leaking windows of the building’s west wing needed to be implemented as soon as possible.  (The wing is slated for environmental remediation and historic rehabilitation, as was completed in the building’s east wing.)  DuBois had the idea of covering the windows with student art projects and an idea was born.

Wagner, who has collaborated with the Center for Rural Partnerships at Plymouth State University on other projects in the past, saw an opportunity to involve PSU students in a one-of-a-kind project to educate the public and celebrate an important part of Berlin’s history.  He contacted Thad Guldbrandsen, who connected with faculty members Tom Driscoll and (now Dean of Arts & Sciences) Cynthia Vascak.  Tom offered to create a public mural course for the Spring 2011 semester and the planning phase began in earnest.

Photo Credit: Kaleb Hart

Students visited the site, interviewed content experts, developed and proposed multiple designs, and executed the final version—all within the bounds of a single semester!

Photo Credit: Kaleb Hart

Involved in the project were: Olivia Benish, Michelle Boudreau, Brittany Connors, Nicole Copple, Nathan Cote, Katie Cotoir, Elizabeth Dalp, Meredith Gourley, Tara Krehbiel, Craig Maines, Kristin Sarette, and Sam Smart.

Photo Credit: Kaleb Hart

Kaleb Hart captured the project in progress with photographs (including those featured in this post) and is producing a video documentary.

The mural project required collaboration and support from a wide range of participants, including funders, off-campus organizations and suppliers, content experts, and others.  In addition to securing partial funding and networking to connect with supportive suppliers, Jim Wagner coordinated the off-campus participants and installation of the panels.

Photo Credit: Kaleb Hart

PSU contributions included course development and execution (Tom Driscoll), project facilitation (Thad Guldbrandsen), content review (Linda Upham-Bornstein), design and execution (PSU students), and project proposal development/management (Alice Richmond).  The project was funded, in part, by the Neil & Louise Tillotson Fund of the New Hampshire Charitable Foundation via the CfRP’s Coös County Outreach Initiative.

 

 

 

 

 

Experience Caravanserei in NH!

October 12th, 2011 by Alice

Caravanserai: A Place Where Cultures Meet brings Muslim art and artists to American audiences

October 12, 2011—The Arts Alliance of Northern New Hampshire (AANNH) will host Caravanserai: A Place Where Cultures Meet in a special activity-packed residency from October 16-22, 2011.  This year’s residencies feature the creative arts of Pakistan.  The AANNH residency hosts two musical groups: Qawal Najmuddin Saifuddin & Brothers and the Tari Khan Ensemble.

Qawal Najmuddin Saifuddin & Brothers are the direct descendents of the first choirs to sing in the Khusrou qawwali tradition, more than 700 years ago.  They are considered the present-day torch bearers of this transcendent form of Sufi devotional music.  The Caravanserai residencies mark their first appearances in the U.S.

The Tari Khan Ensemble is led by percussionist Ustad Tari Khan, internationally acclaimed as “The Tabla Prince of India and Pakistan.”  Tablas are hand drums that whose mastery results in a wide array of sounds and tones.  His mesmerizing tabla performance will be accompanied by additional percussionists playing dholis.  Dholis are double-headed drums worn suspended from a strap across the player’s neck.  The player holds a different kind of stick in each hand and plays both ends of the drum simultaneously while spinning.

In addition to the culminating concert, the schedule of events includes a vegetarian potluck welcoming reception, world music jam, an intergenerational drumming workshop, and two informal presentations (for schedule details, click here).  All events except the final concert are free and open to people of all ages.

Launched by Arts Midwest in 2010 (on behalf of the US Regional Arts Organizations) with support from the Doris Duke Foundation for Islamic Art, Caravanserai residencies provide  American audiences a unique opportunity to “experience the diversity of contemporary Muslim artistic expressions.”   The AANNH is honored to be one of only five organizations in America selected as a host for the 2011-2012 season.  Please attend one or more of these unique and enriching events!

(Click the images below for one-page PDF study guides about each of the artists!)

Qawal Najmuddin Saifuddin & Brothers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tari Khan Ensemble

Contact Us

Mailing Address:
MSC 68, 17 High St.
Plymouth State University

(603) 535-3275 (Voice)
psu-cfrp@plymouth.edu

Ben Amsden
Director
blamsden@plymouth.edu
(603) 535-3276

Marylynn Cote
Administrative Assistant
mcote9@plymouth.edu
(603) 535-3271

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