Fall 2014 Environmental Science Colloquium

September 17th, 2014 by June

043The Center for the Environment announces speakers for this fall’s Environmental Science Colloquium series. These talks are open to everyone. Talks are on Wednesdays from 4-5 pm in are held in Boyd Science Center Room 001 or 144. Please join us!

  • September 17 –Charles Bayless – Climate Change and Ocean Acidification, Our Greatest Challenges
  • October 15 – June Hammond Rowan (PSU) – What is the Planning Board Doing? Investigating Decisions by New Hampshire Planning Boards
  • October 22 – Nick Metz (Hobart and William Smith Colleges) – An Exploration of the Effects of the Great Lakes on Mature Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCSs)
  • October 29 – Amy Villamagna (PSU) – Regulating Services as Measures of Ecological Resilience on Department of Defense Lands
  • November 12 – Jaclyn Hatala Matthes (Dartmouth) – Using historical ecology to refine our understanding of land-atmosphere feedbacks
  • November 19 – Jasmine Saros (U. Maine) – Reconstructing lake thermal structure in a changing climate
  • December 10 – Dick McGrath (Isosceles Group) – History and current status of the Housatonic River PCB remediation

For more information, contact CFE or Lisa Doner.

Climate Change Talk: September 17, 4 pm, Boyd 144

September 10th, 2014 by June

Climate change talk 9-17-14On September 17, 2014 at 4 pm, Charles Bayless will present a talk on “Climate Change and Ocean Acidification, our greatest challenge.” This talk is open to all. Please join us in Boyd Science Center, Room 144.

Mr. Bylesss is the prior President and Provost of West Virginia University Institute of Technology, and retired a utility executive. He has had a long, diverse career in the energy sector and works closely with climate scientists. He is currently a board member of Pike Electric and Chair of the Audit Committee, Recycled Energy Development and West Virginia American Water. He is Chair of the Arctic Climate Action Steering Committee and a board member at the Climate Institute. He has served as President and CEO of Illinova Corporation (Illinois Power Company, among others), and of Tucson Electric Power Company (UniSource Energy). He was also Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of Public Service Company of New Hampshire, and served as Chairman of Essential Power, Independent Wireless One, Ontario Power Authority, West Virginia Industrial Council.  In 1993, Financial World awarded Mr. Bayless its CEO of the Year Bronze Medal. Also in 1993, the Wall Street Transcript named Mr. Bayless the winner of its CEO of the Year Bronze Medal. In 1995, Financial World awarded Mr. Bayless its CEO of the Year Silver Medal.

Mark Green Wins Award for Distinguished Scholarship

September 9th, 2014 by June
Mark Green

Mark Green

Professors Paul Rogalus, Scott Coykendall and Mark Green were honored by their Plymouth State University faculty colleagues at the institution’s annual Faculty Day event August 27. Julie Bernier, PSU’s Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost, presented Green with the Award for Distinguished Scholarship and Rogalus received the Award for Faculty Service. Coykendall received the Faculty Advising Award from Student Senate member Evan Gaudette on behalf of the student body.

“I am so pleased and honored to have the opportunity to recognize faculty excellence this morning with three awards,” said Bernier. “It is particularly satisfying to be able to honor such wonderful and deserving colleagues.”

CFE Celebrates its 10th Anniversary!

September 5th, 2014 by June

Plymouth State University  students check water sensors as part of the Center for the Environment's work in collecting data from sites around New Hampshire.PLYMOUTH, N.H.–One of New Hampshire’s most effective environmental research and protection organizations celebrated its tenth anniversary August 29. The Center for the Environment (CFE) at Plymouth State University was created in 2004 to study the science, policies, culture, and economics of the natural environment in northern New England through research, education, and collaboration. In addressing a gathering at the Squam Lakes Association in Holderness, Plymouth State President Sara Jayne Steen said the CFE has provided expert support and expertise in environmental matters critical to the region and the state.

“Since 2004, the Center for the Environment has been a resource for research in New Hampshire’s ecosystem, providing critical information for decision makers and linking scientists and local state and federal agencies and the public,” noted Steen. “It is a key regional and state player in promoting a sustainable future, creating powerful partnerships that benefit the State of New Hampshire and communities throughout the region. Its cutting edge research focused on environmental science as it relates to New Hampshire’s ecosystem, society and economy has far reaching benefits that improve life in New Hampshire. And it is educating the next generation of environmental scientists.”

Rogers Serves as Reviewer for TPL Report on Land Conservation in NH

July 9th, 2014 by June

Shannon Rogers, Assistant Professor and Ecological Economist in the Center for the Environment, recently served as a technical reviewer of a new report by the Trust for Public Land (TPL) about land conservation in New Hampshire. According to TPL, the report, New Hampshire’s Return on Investment in Land Conservation, quantitatively demonstrates that state investment in land conservation has measurable economic value. Conserved lands provide natural goods and services such as water quality protection, wildlife habitat and air pollution removal – all important to New Hampshire’s strong economy and jobs. For every $1 invested in land conservation by New Hampshire returns $11 in natural goods and services

In TPL’s announcement about the report, Shannon noted that, “Studies like The Trust for Public Land’s help to shine a light on the ‘hidden’ value our natural environment provides through goods and services we might take for granted otherwise. It also helps us identify and prioritize conservation efforts.”

Geological Society of America Awards Scholarships to PSU Student Nadine Orejola

June 25th, 2014 by June

Nadine Orejola

Nadine Orejola was recently awarded two research scholarships from the Geological Society of America. She is the recipient of the 2014 ExxonMobil/GSA Student Geoscience Grant and the John Montagne Award. Nadine is a student in Plymouth State University’s (PSU) Master of Science program in Environmental Science and Policy and the awards supports her Master’s Thesis research.

Extreme Precipitation and Beach Closures in the Great Lakes Region

May 21st, 2014 by June

Kathleen Bush recently co-authored a paper on “Extreme Precipitation and Beach Closures in the Great Lakes Region: Evaluating Risk among the Elderly,” published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. A summary of the study and its implications for swimmers and beach managers is available through the Grand Rapids Business Journal.

Student Showcase of Excellence

May 21st, 2014 by June

Each spring, Plymouth State University hosts a Student Showcase of Excellence. This event features student research projects from a variety of disciplines from science to the arts to the humanities.

The following MS students in Environmental Science and Policy participated in the 2014 Student Showcase of Excellence:

  • Jamie Sydoriak – Conserving Grassland Bird Habitat on Private Land in the Upper Valley, Other Collaborators: Rosalind Renfrew, Pamela Hunt, Shannon Rogers, Len Reitsma, Faculty Sponsor: Len Reitsma
  • Micah Hall – A Visual Approach to Generating Normative Standards of Quality for Two Squam Lake, New Hampshire Hiking Trails, Faculty Sponsor: Benoni Amsden
  • Jonathon Loos – Flood Insurance Rates and Mitigation ecosystem Services in the Upper Valley of the Connecticut River, Faculty Sponsor: Shannon Rogers
  • Jessica Wilhelm – Meat Production, Processing and Market Demand in New Hampshire, Other Researchers: Rachelle Lyons & Taylor Dillingham, Faculty Sponsor: Benoni Amsden
  • Melissa L. Leszek – Using Community Based Social Marketing to Encourage Lead-Free Fishing Practices in New Hampshire Lakes and Rivers, Faculty Sponsor: Brian W. Eisenhauer
  • Melanie Perello – Determining relationships between past and current climate and water quality conditions in Ossipee Lake and Squam Lake, N.H. to establish lake functioning baselines and improve monitoring strategies, Faculty Sponsor: Lisa Doner
  • Nadine Orejola – Characterizing Iceland Lake Sediments: Identification of Storm Surge And  Flooding Events In A Climate Sensitive Northern Latitude Lake,  Other Collaborators: Lisa Doner, Brad Hubeny, Faculty Sponsor: Lisa Doner
  • Chelsea Berg – Evaluating the Ecosystem Service of Nutrient Removal in a Coastal Watershed: A Case Study of New Hampshire’s Great Bay, Faculty Sponsor: Shannon Rogers
  • Jessica Wilhelm – A Spatial Analysis of the Impacts of Road Salt on Trace Metal Concentrations in New Hampshire Rivers, Faculty Sponsors: Mark Green, Kathleen Bush
  • Jennifer Bell – Embryophyte Community Structure And Water Chemistry Relationships Across A Condition Gradient In Red Maple – Sphagnum Basin Swamps: A Working Proposal, Faculty Sponsor: Joe Boyer
  • Benjamin Bolaski – Linkages between the North Atlantic Oscillation and watershed response from northwest Iceland lake sediments, Student Researchers & Other Collaborators: Lisa A Doner, Isla S Casteneda, Bradford Hubeny, Nadine Orejola; Faculty Sponsor: Lisa Doner

Shared Waters Create a Shared Future for the Squam Lakes Watershed

April 4th, 2014 by June

In 1991, the NH Office of State Planning completed a Squam Lakes Watershed Plan. In the twenty-three years since the plan was adopted, a lot has changed in the region, but yet this plan has not been updated. View the summary of the 1991 Squam Watershed Plan here.

This winter, several graduate students at Plymouth State University enrolled in a land use planning class that focuses on teaching local planning concepts through an applied project. The class worked with the Squam Lakes Association (SLA) to learn about local town planning, identify current land use issues and priorities in area towns and the watershed, and determine how a new watershed plan might be cooperatively developed. In late January, we held a public meeting at the SLA to discuss past, present, and future land use issues in area towns and the Squam Lakes Watershed.

The results of the course and the public meeting can be read in “Shared Waters Create a Shared Future for the Squam Lakes Watershed,” a report from the Plymouth State University graduate students who participated in a land use planning class this winter. Also, a poster summarizing the public participation method used at the January public meeting was presented at the March 21, 2014 NH Water & Watershed Conference.

NH Resident’s Use & Value of Water

March 19th, 2014 by June

New Watershed Survey by Plymouth State and UNH Investigators Shows New Hampshire Residents Willing to Pay Higher Fees to Improve Water Quality

PLYMOUTH, N.H.– A new survey shows many Granite Staters and residents of the Piscataqua Watershed are concerned about the level of pollution in our water resources and would be willing to pay higher fees to ensure water quality is improved. The report from researchers at Plymouth State University’s Center for the Environment and the Piscataqua Region Estuaries Partnership (PREP) at the University of New Hampshire, “New Hampshire’s Citizens Value and Use Water in Many Ways: A Preliminary Report of the New Hampshire and Piscataqua Region Water and Watershed Survey,” was compiled from more than 600 responses from randomly sampled New Hampshire residents throughout the State and Maine residents living in the Piscataqua Region.  Respondents answered questions about water resource use and value.

Big Squam Lake, N.H. from Mt. Morgan. Photo credit: Jonathon Loos

The survey, led by Shannon Rogers, Assistant Professor at PSU, and Jill Farrell, Community Impact Manager from PREP, indicate that 90 percent of New Hampshire respondents are concerned with the level of pollution in local streams, rivers, lakes, and bays; 80 percent understand the connection between clean water resources and economic stability of their community and 70 percent agree that they would be willing to pay higher water and sewer fees to improve the cleanliness of the lakes, rivers, streams, and bays in their community.

Contact Us

Contact Us

January 9th, 2013 by Michael

Center for the Environment

Plymouth State University
Russell House
MSC #63, 17 High Street
Plymouth, NH 03264
psu-cfe@plymouth.edu

phone (603) 535-3179
fax (603) 535-3004