James P. Koermer

James P. Koermer

Professor Emeritus of Meteorology

BS, University of Maryland; MS, PhD, University of Utah
Email: koermer@plymouth.edu

About Professor Koermer

Dr. James P. Koermer received his B.S. in mathematics from the University of Maryland, pursued undergraduate coursework in meteorology at the University of Texas, and went on for his M.S. and Ph.D. in meteorology from the University of Utah. His areas of expertise include dynamic meteorology, mesometeorology, numerical weather prediction and computer applications. Dr. Koermer is a UNIDATA site representative for WXP, LDM and IEIS.

Dr. Koermer began his career as weather officer for the U.S. Air Force, retiring after 20 years as a lieutenant colonel. His work for the Air Force included positions as airfield weather forecaster (Ft. Benning, Ga.); assistant staff weather officer for the 82nd Airborne Division (Ft. Bragg, N.C.); chief forecaster for the U.S. Army Europe, Tactical Forecast Unit in Heidelberg, Germany; assistant chief/chief of the Numerical Models & Statistical Application Division of the Air Weather Service (Scott AFB, Ill.); chief of the technical and software development branches of the Air Force Global Weather Central (Offutt AFB, Neb.) and program manager for atmospheric sciences at the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (Bolling AFB, Washington, D.C.)

Prior to joining the Plymouth State faculty in 1988, Dr. Koermer served as adjunct assistant professor at Saint Louis (Mo.) University and then at Creighton University (Omaha, Neb.). He served as chair of the Natural Science Department at Plymouth State from 1997-1999 and is currently director of the Judd Gregg Meteorology Institute at PSU.

Contact Us

Department of Atmospheric Science & Chemistry

Department Chair:
Susan Swope

Boyd Hall
Phone: 603-535-2325
Email: marsi@plymouth.edu (Marsi Wisniewski, Administrative Assistant)
Fax: 603-535-2723

Mailing Address
17 High Street
MSC #48
Plymouth, NH 03264

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