Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

  1. General Questions
  2. Program-Specific Questions

General Questions

May I attend the programs part-time?

Our program is flexible with part-time and full-time enrollment available. Student taking six credits per term are enrolled full-time. The PSU College of Graduate Studies accepts applications on a rolling basis, which means that students may submit applications and be accepted at any time throughout the year.

Do you offer online courses?

We offer face-to-face, online, and hybrid courses, which have a combination of online and face-to-face instruction. Students will be expected to attend most of their courses, especially skills-based courses, in a face-to-face setting.

When are classes offered?

Classes are offered in 12-week terms during the Fall, Winter and Spring terms. The Fall, Winter, and Spring courses are scheduled during the evening, typically 5-8:45 p.m., to support working students. In contrast, Summer classes are mostly offered during the day, twice a week in a condensed 5-week July term, but the department does offer at least one evening course and a hybrid and fully online offering most summers.

How much do the programs cost?

See current graduate tutition rates

Are financial aid and scholarships available?

Learn more about financial aid available for graduate school.

A few small graduate scholarships are available each year as are a few opportunities to serve as a graduate assistant or adjunct instructor. Applications are due by April 1st for Fall. Learn more about assistantship applications and scholarship applications. Please forward your resume and letter of interest to Gary Goodnough at ggoodno@plymouth.edu if you wish you be considered for an adjunct faculty position.

How do I obtain an internship site?

Internships are arranged with consideration to where students live geographically and where we have qualified supervision. We have an internship coordinator that helps in finding sites and setting up the necessary agreements. Typically they are not paid, although some students have been able to secure some paid work in connection with their internship.

How and when should I apply?

Our program has rolling admissions, which means that individuals may apply at any time. One of the unique benefits of our program is that we allow prospective students to take up to 12 credits before being admitted to the program. If interested in this option, please let your advisor know and he/she will advise you into appropriate courses. Learn more about specific application requirements.

Program-Specific Questions

Clinical Mental Health Counseling Program

Is the CMHC program accredited?

The MS in Clinical Mental Health Counseling is accredited by the Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Education Programs (CACREP) and meets the robust standards set forth to be recognized as a clinical mental health counselor across the nation. The program includes coursework that fulfills the academic requirements for you to begin acquiring post-master’s supervised hours for licensure as a Clinical Mental Health Counselor in New Hampshire, and mirrors the requirements for most other states.

Who are Clinical Mental Health Counselors?

According to the American Mental Health Counselors Association, “Clinical mental health counseling is a distinct profession with national standards for education, training and clinical practice. Clinical mental health counselors are highly-skilled professionals who provide flexible, consumer-oriented therapy. They combine traditional psychotherapy with a practical, problem-solving approach that creates a dynamic and efficient path for change and problem resolution” (AMHCA Facts About Clinical Mental Health Counselors, para. 1). Clinical mental health counselors work in a variety of settings (e.g., community mental health centers, colleges, hospitals, correctional facilities, private practice, etc.) with diverse individuals (e.g., children, adolescents, adults, older adults, etc.) who may have a array of concerns (e.g., eating disorders, substance abuse, grief and loss, divorce, mood disorders, etc.). With a degree in Clinical Mental Health Counseling, students are afforded many different career opportunities. To learn more about clinical mental health counseling, visit amhca.org/about/facts.aspx

What types of courses would I take in the CMHC program?

Students in the Clinical Mental Health Counseling program take general courses (e.g., Advanced Human Development, Research Design, Social Behavior and Diversity, etc.), advanced clinical mental health counseling courses (e.g., Assessment, Diagnosis, and Treatment Planning; Psychopharmacology; Crisis and Trauma Counseling; Substance Abuse and Co-Occurring Disorders; etc.), and complete their degree with field experiences (i.e., Seminar and Intership in Mental Health Counseling). After they have completed their program, students are well-versed in the theoretical and pragmatic aspects of counseling. See specific courses requirements.

How long does the CMHC program take to complete?

The Clinical Mental Health Counseling program is 63 credits, and the duration of time it takes to complete the program depends on how many credits students take per term. Most students finish the program in around 2.5 years if they take roughly 9 credits (or 3 classes) per term. More specifically, the 2.5 years includes 1.5 years of coursework and 1 year of practicum and internship.

Once I have completed the CMHC program, am I licensed?

Not yet. State licensure requires students to obtain additional post-graduate hours. In New Hampshire, individuals must obtain an additional 3,000 hours of supervised practice before they are license-eligible. Additionally, individuals must complete the National Clinical Mental Health Counselor Exam (NCMHC) and apply for licensure. Requirements for licensure vary across states. If you are planning to live in a state outside of New Hampshire, you are encouraged to speak with your advisor about this, and he/she will help you tailor your program contract to align with applicable state licensure laws.

School Counseling Program

Is the SC program accredited?

The MEd in School Counseling is nationally accredited by the Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Education Programs (CACREP). It is the only school counseling program in New Hampshire to hold this prestigious accreditation. Completion of the program enables students to be recognized as a school counselor in most states.

Who are School Counselors?

School Counselors are valuable members of school communities. They work directly and indirectly with students, teachers, administrators, other school staff, parents, and the wider community to promote student’s academic, career, and personal social growth. School counselors often engage in individual and group counseling with students. Further they are responsible for the design and implementation of a school’s guidance curriculum. Model guidance curriculums are in alignment with the American School Counseling Association (ASCA) national model and can be found at schoolcounselor.org. School counselors act as a support system for students, as well as, the varied adults that they interact with.

To learn more about school counseling in the state of New Hampshire, visit nhsca.camp7.org.

What types of courses would I take in the SC program?

Students in the School Counseling program take general courses (e.g., Advanced Human Development, Research Design, Social Behavior and Diversity, etc.). Additionally, school counseling students will take courses that are specific to their specialization, including: Foundations of School Counseling, Counseling Youth, Critical Issues in Schools, and Counselor in the Classroom. Students will complete their degree with field experiences (i.e., Practicum and Internship). See specific course requirements.

How long does the SC program take to complete?

The School Counseling program is 48 credits, and the duration of time it takes to complete the program depends on how many credits students take per term. Most full time students finish the program in around two years if they take around 9 credits (or 3 classes) per term. The majority of the second year will be spent completing practicum and internship hours in the field (700 in all). Part-time students usually take between three and four years to complete the program.

School Psychology Program

Who are School Psychologists?

School psychologists are highly trained in both psychology and education. They help youth succeed academically, socially, and emotionally by collaborating with educators, parents, and other professionals to create safe, healthy, and supportive learning environments that strengthen connections between home and school for all students. School psychologists work to find the best solution for each student and situation using different strategies to address student needs and to improve school and district-wide support systems. They also work with students individually and in groups, develop programs to train teachers and parents about effective teaching and learning strategies as well as techniques to manage behavior at home and in the classroom. Using evidence-based models, school psychologists work with students with disabilities and special talents, address abuse of drugs and other substances, and prevent and manage crises; provide psychological counseling to help resolve interpersonal or family problems that interfere with school performance; help families and schools manage crises such as death, illness, or community trauma; promote tolerance, understanding, and appreciation of diversity within the school community; and develop programs to make schools safer and more effective learning environments. Because of the dynamic nature of a school psychologist’s professional role, it is necessary that they possess strong interpersonal skills and are able to work well with others.

School psychologists must be certified and/or licensed by the state in which they work. They also may be nationally certified by the National School Psychology Certification Board (NSPCB). For more information on school psychology, visit nhaspweb.org or nasponline.org.

What types of courses would I take in the SP program?

Students in the School Psychology program take general courses (e.g., Advanced Human Development, Research Design, Social Behavior and Diversity, etc.). Additionally, school psychology students will take courses that are specific to their specialization, including: Foundations of School Psychology, Psychopathology: Disorders of Childhood, Adolescence, and Adulthood, Educational Testing, and social, emotional, and behavioral assessment, analysis, and intervention. Students will complete their degree with field experiences (i.e., Practicum and Internship). See specific course requirements.

The program is 69 credits, and the duration of time it takes to complete the program depends on how many credits students take per term. Most full time students finish the program in around two and a half years if they take around 9 credits (or 3 classes) per term. The majority of the second year will be spent completing practicum and internship hours in the field (1,300 in all). Part-time students usually take between three and four years to complete the program.

Once I have completed the SP program, am I certified?

Yes! Upon completion of the School Psychology program, graduates are certified by the New Hampshire Department of Education to practice as school psychologists. Graduates are also eligible to become Nationally Certified School Psychologists by taking and passing the National School Psychology Examination.

Contact Us

Department of Counselor Education and School Psychology

Highland Hall, 2nd floor
Mon-Thu, 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Fri, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.
Or by appointment

Phone: (603) 535-3119
Email: sakilfoyle@plymouth.edu
(Sally Kilfoyle, Administrative Assistant)
Fax: (603) 535-2572

Mailing Address
17 High Street
MSC 11
Plymouth, NH 03264-1595