Dr. Robin DeRosa

Teaching Women’s Studies courses is a pleasure. I thoroughly enjoy being a part of the outstanding caliber of work produced by students in this program, students who are among the most engaged and enthusiastic scholars at Plymouth.
– Dr. Robin DeRosa

Mathew Cheney

MATTHEW CHENEY has been an adjunct professor at PSU since the fall of 2008, teaching courses for the English Department and the Women’s Studies Program.  His particular interests include gender and queer theory, and he has written and published extensively on the work of Samuel R. Delany, whose life and writings delve profoundly into questions of gender, race, and sexuality.  Matthew has published fiction and nonfiction with a wide variety of venues, has been the series editor for the Best American Fantasy anthologies, and is a regular columnist for the online magazines Strange Horizons and Gestalt Mash.  He recently completed work on a short film he wrote and directed, “Meat”, which will, with luck, appear soon at film festivals near you.

Featured in Plymouth Magazine

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Beyond Granite: The Museum of the White Mountains Takes on STEM

As American students and workers fall behind their counterparts around the world in the science and technology fields, educators and policy makers have stressed the importance of strengthening our attention to STEM—science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Exhibition curator Sarah Garlick writes about the connections between earth science, adventure, and the process of learning STEM in […]

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Teaming Up for Service

There’s more to PSU’s student-athletes than excellent grades and athletic prowess. There’s a desire to make a difference in the world. Plymouth State men’s hockey coach Craig Russell ’09 encourages his team to serve as often as possible. Through the nonprofit organization Team IMPACT, which pairs children with life-threatening or chronic illness with local college […]

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Wordsworth Meets Twitter: Teaching English in the Digital Age

Let’s face it: not all English majors aspire to a career in academia, so how do we help our students understand the role their English education plays in professional environments?