Maya Blanchette

The program helps you think about alternative perspective.
– Maya Blanchette ’05, political science major/women’s studies minor

Evaluation Rubric

Women’s Studies

50 Possible Points

  • The essay makes a contribution to the field of Women’s Studies
  • The essay directly acknowledges the field of Women’s Studies.
  • The essay raises provocative issues that deal with topics in Women’s Studies.
  • The essay demonstrates an understanding of Women’s Studies.
  • The purpose and topic of the essay relate directly to Women’s Studies.

Focus/Meaning/Purpose

20 Possible Points

  • The essay has a main idea or main point.  All information relates to this main theme.
  • The essay doesn’t leave loose ends or unanswered questions.
  • The essay displays unity, purpose, and tension so the audience wants to read on.
  • The essay introduces a new perspective, but not necessarily a new idea.
  • The meaning draws readers in and makes them care about what happens.
  • There is significant, original subject and purpose, which avoid cliché.

Interest/Information/Immersion

10 Possible Points

  • The essay has specific details, examples, facts, etc. to back up generalizations.
  • The details are carefully selected and appropriate to the focus of the piece.
  • The subject is interesting and evokes a strong emotional or thoughtful response.
  • The tone is clear and appropriate for the topic; the tone and style are consistent.

Language/Form/Mechanics

10 Possible Points

  • The essay is without errors.
  • Words are chosen well, with strong action verbs, specific nouns, and clear language.
  • The essay follows the format guidelines and/or the format for its field: APA, MLA, etc…
  • The author’s name is on the cover page but does not appear anywhere else in the essay.
  • The essay is scholarly, indicating research-based, thesis-based, or analytical work.

Clarity/Organization

5 Possible Points

  • The essay flows easily from paragraph to paragraph, and thought to thought.
  • Logical sequencing makes the essay easy to read and understand.
  • The subject is developed and expanded throughout the text.

Title/Lead/Ending

5 Possible Points

  • The lead grabs readers, draws them in, relates to what follows, and is honest.
  • The ending leaves the reader with something to think about, and follows the piece naturally.
  • The title catches the readers’ attention and makes them want to read the piece.

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