Shirley Glines

Women’s Studies courses brought together many passions for me, and eventually led to my now being in an M.Ed. program in order to teach women’s history at the college level.
– Shirley Glines ’00, interdisciplinary studies major, women’s studies minor

Evaluation Rubric

Women’s Studies

50 Possible Points

  • The essay makes a contribution to the field of Women’s Studies
  • The essay directly acknowledges the field of Women’s Studies.
  • The essay raises provocative issues that deal with topics in Women’s Studies.
  • The essay demonstrates an understanding of Women’s Studies.
  • The purpose and topic of the essay relate directly to Women’s Studies.

Focus/Meaning/Purpose

20 Possible Points

  • The essay has a main idea or main point.  All information relates to this main theme.
  • The essay doesn’t leave loose ends or unanswered questions.
  • The essay displays unity, purpose, and tension so the audience wants to read on.
  • The essay introduces a new perspective, but not necessarily a new idea.
  • The meaning draws readers in and makes them care about what happens.
  • There is significant, original subject and purpose, which avoid cliché.

Interest/Information/Immersion

10 Possible Points

  • The essay has specific details, examples, facts, etc. to back up generalizations.
  • The details are carefully selected and appropriate to the focus of the piece.
  • The subject is interesting and evokes a strong emotional or thoughtful response.
  • The tone is clear and appropriate for the topic; the tone and style are consistent.

Language/Form/Mechanics

10 Possible Points

  • The essay is without errors.
  • Words are chosen well, with strong action verbs, specific nouns, and clear language.
  • The essay follows the format guidelines and/or the format for its field: APA, MLA, etc…
  • The author’s name is on the cover page but does not appear anywhere else in the essay.
  • The essay is scholarly, indicating research-based, thesis-based, or analytical work.

Clarity/Organization

5 Possible Points

  • The essay flows easily from paragraph to paragraph, and thought to thought.
  • Logical sequencing makes the essay easy to read and understand.
  • The subject is developed and expanded throughout the text.

Title/Lead/Ending

5 Possible Points

  • The lead grabs readers, draws them in, relates to what follows, and is honest.
  • The ending leaves the reader with something to think about, and follows the piece naturally.
  • The title catches the readers’ attention and makes them want to read the piece.

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