Spring 2014

Tuesday, February 11, 2014 at 7 p.m.
“R2P: Why Libya? Why Not Syria?”
Thomas Weiss, professor at the CUNY Graduate Center and director of the Ralph Bunche Institute for International Studies

The Responsibility to Protect (R2P) is an international security and human rights initiative to prevent and stop genocide, war crimes, ethnic cleansing, and crimes against humanity. Weiss explores how decisions are made regarding whether, when, where, and why to intervene to protect civilians.

Thomas Weiss is presidential professor of political science at the CUNY Graduate Center and director of the Ralph Bunche Institute for International Studies; he is also research professor at the School of Oriental and African Studies at the University of London. A past president of the International Studies Association, former chair of the Academic Council on the UN System, and former editor of Global Governance, Weiss has authored or edited some 45 books and 225 articles and book chapters about multilateral approaches to international peace and security, humanitarian action, and sustainable development.

Thursday, March 27, 2014 at 7 p.m.
“Inequality Matters:  How Wealth Inequality is Wrecking the World and What We Can Do About It”
Chuck Collins, senior scholar at the Institute for Policy Studies in Washington, DC

The gap between rich and poor is the widest it has been in a century, and our national conversation about how to address this challenge is polarized. Collins will discuss the impact of inequality and the path toward an economy that works for everyone.

Chuck Collins is a senior scholar at the Institute for Policy Studies in Washington, DC, where he directs the Program on Inequality and the Common Good, and is well known for his efforts to bridge the national debate on wealth inequality and taxes. He is cofounder of Wealth for the Common Good and the Patriotic Millionaires, two efforts to organize members of the 1 percent to advocate for fair tax policy.

Collins is co-author with Bill Gates Sr. of Wealth and Our Commonwealth: Why America Should Tax Accumulated Fortunes, and co-author of The Moral Measure of the Economy, about Christian ethics and economic life. His most recent book is 99 to 1: How Wealth Inequality is Wrecking the World and What We Can Do About It.

Wednesday, April 2, 2014 at 7 p.m.
“The Promises and Perils of the New Biology”

Thomas F. Lee, author and retired educator and biologist

We are living in an exciting era of modern biotechnology that allows us unprecedented control over life forms. Lee will discuss the rich opportunities and ethical perils this presents.

Thomas Lee retired in 2002 after 35 years as a professor in the Biology Department at Saint Anselm College. His areas of interest include microbiology, marine algal development, and genetic engineering. Lee has published and spoke widely on his research on plant tissue culture, cellular polarity, and airborne microorganisms. Several of his books have received noteworthy attention, and he has been a frequent contributor to the Encyclopedia Americana, authoring articles on genetic engineering and molecular biology.

All Sidore lectures are free and open to the public. Each talk is followed by a reception with light refreshments. Tickets are required and advance reservations are recommended: call (603) 535-ARTS.

All Sidore lectures are free and open to the public, but reservations are recommended. A reception follows each lecture. Lectures are presented in the Smith Recital Hall in the Silver Center for the Arts, unless otherwise noted.

For reservations or to arrange special accommodations, call (603) 535-ARTS.

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