As the farmers left, the hotels came…

The Deserted Copp Homestead Guy L. Shorey Collection, White Mountain Observatory

The Deserted Copp Homestead Guy L. Shorey Collection, White Mountain Observatory

As New England farmers left the area for Midwest farmlands, the White Mountains grew increasingly popular. Fabyans, the Lafayette House, the Flume House, and many other increasingly comfortable hotels sprang up throughout the region.

Tourists clutching their guidebooks traveled by railroads to the Whites beginning in the early 1850s and more followed. Popular among urbanized New Englanders and New Yorkers, the tourist industry promoted the Whites as a place for quiet rejuvenation and contemplation.

Deserted Farmhouse Larrabee Collection, Photographs, Special Collections, New Hampshire Historical Society, Concord, NH

Deserted Farmhouse Larrabee Collection, Photographs, Special Collections, New Hampshire Historical Society, Concord, NH

10th New Hampshire Turnpike c. 1860. Note the stumps and rough condition adjacent to the roadway. Half of a stereo view, George Eastman House, WhiteMountainHistory.org

10th New Hampshire Turnpike c. 1860. Note the stumps and10th New Hampshire Turnpike c. 1860. Note the stumps and rough condition adjacent to the roadway. Half of a stereo view, George Eastman House, WhiteMountainHistory.org.

“A Guide to Pleasant Places Among the Mountains, Lakes and Valleys of New Hampshire” Issued by the Passenger Department of the Concord and Montreal Railroad, 1890 Plymouth Historical Society

“A Guide to Pleasant Places Among the Mountains, Lakes and Valleys of New Hampshire” Issued by the Passenger Department of the Concord and Montreal Railroad, 1890 Plymouth Historical Society

1889 Schedule for the Concord Railroad Plymouth Historical Society

1889 Schedule for the Concord Railroad Plymouth Historical Society