J.E. Henry riding a ‘jigger’ car or ‘track cycle’ in Lincoln, NH, c.1906 Photographs, Special Collections, New Hampshire Historical Society, Concord, NH

J.E. Henry riding a ‘jigger’ car or ‘track cycle’ in Lincoln, NH, c.1906 Photographs, Special Collections, New Hampshire Historical Society, Concord, NH

I never see the tree yit that didn’t mean a damned sight more to me goin’ under the saw than it did standin’ on a mountain.

Quote from one of J.E. Henry’s sons. C. Francis Belcher, Logging Railroads of the White Mountains (Boston: AMC, 1980), 131.

Skidway at No.12, Lincoln Horse teams brought the logs to the roadway while the scaler measured the logs as they waited. The logs could then be loaded onto cars and brought out by train. Camp No. 12 of J.E. Henry & Sons is to the right. September 1903. Forest History Society

Skidway at No.12, Lincoln Horse teams brought the logs to the roadway while the scaler measured the logs as they waited. The logs could then be loaded onto cars and brought out by train. Camp No. 12 of J.E. Henry & Sons is to the right. September 1903. Forest History Society

Mill Log Pond Forest History Society

Mill Log Pond Forest History Society

J.E Henry & Sons, East Branch and Lincoln Camp 8 Rick Russack, WhiteMountainHistory.org

J.E Henry & Sons, East Branch and Lincoln Camp 8 Rick Russack, WhiteMountainHistory.org

J.E. Henry & Sons log teams at a log landing on the East Branch & Lincoln Railroad, 1895 Photographs, Special Collections, New Hampshire Historical Society, Concord, NH

J.E. Henry & Sons log teams at a log landing on the East Branch & Lincoln Railroad, 1895 Photographs, Special Collections, New Hampshire Historical Society, Concord, NH

Livermore Falls Pulp Mill, Campton J.E. Henry converted an existing mill to a pulp mill, allowing him to use every last limb of the trees he felled. He eventually cut out the middle man and used it to make paper himself in Lincoln. Rick Russack, WhiteMountainHistory.org

Livermore Falls Pulp Mill, Campton J.E. Henry converted an existing mill to a pulp mill, allowing him to use every last limb of the trees he felled. He eventually cut out the middle man and used it to make paper himself in Lincoln. Rick Russack, WhiteMountainHistory.org