Curriculum Administrator, K-12

The Curriculum Administrator program is designed to develop outstanding instructional leaders who will encourage the improvement of learning opportunities and academic achievement for all students. The objectives of the various courses required in the program are based on the NH state standards for the certification endorsement and adhere to the guidelines set by ISLLC for programs in educational leadership.

The program of study addresses the role of the curriculum administrator as a leader of a professional learning community who is charged with the responsibilities of planning, implementing, and evaluating educational programs that are relevant and responsive to the needs of learners. Courses will address the competencies required of the curriculum administrator as collaborative leader, decision-maker, consultant, and specialist in advising administrators, teachers, the community, and other professional personnel on the research and best practices in curriculum development, instruction, and assessment of student learning.

Candidates for the Curriculum Administrator program must have at least three years of experience as a K–12 educator and hold at least a master’s degree in curriculum and instruction, or in education, with additional coursework in the areas of curriculum, instruction, and assessment.

Candidates will participate in coursework and field experiences and construct a portfolio based on the standards for certification to demonstrate their skills, competencies, and knowledge before completing the program for certification endorsement.

  • Prerequisite Coursework (from master’s or post-master’s)
  • 3
    AD 5700 School Law
    Federal and state laws that apply to school systems, educational programs, and personnel will be discussed. Also covered will be the legal prerogatives available to the administrator and local boards of education. Consideration of constitutional, statutory, and case-law foundations of education systems, and the school administrator's role will be discussed. Prerequisite: AD 5010.
  • - OR -
  • 3
    This three-credit course will give participants a greater understanding of both federal and New Hampshire special education law. Time will be spent on Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. This course is designed and intended for teachers and special education administrators. You do not need to be a law student to succeed in this class. There is a heavy emphasis in this course on theory to practice, "practical news you can use" the next day in your profession. Students will review the most current cases and trends in special education law, analyze cases, and learn how to research both statutory and case law.
  • 3

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  • - OR -
  • 3
    This instructional technology course is designed to provide technology educators, School Media Specialists, K-12 educators, and administrators with an understanding of ways current and emerging technologies can be used to facilitate teaching, learning, and managing instruction. Discussions will focus on issues, trends, and current uses of technology in K-12 education. Sessions will focus upon gaining experience integrating digital technology within the Common Core Standards, evaluating web 2.0 tools, exploring video resources, and designing technology enhanced lessons utilizing digital storytelling for K-12 curriculum integration.
  • 3
    An overview of current theories concerning the brain, development, and learning. Analysis of developmental concepts from birth through adolescence and adulthood. Discussion of language acquisition, thinking and learning styles, multiple intelligence, and creativity. Topics include teaching, learning, and assessment issues related to cultural diversity, technology, and learning differences.
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  • 3
    Focuses on a life-span approach to human development and looks at the constancy and change in behavior throughout life, from conception to death. Students will study human development in the context of a multidisciplinary approach and the larger ecological context of developmental events in human behavior. This course will have four major concerns: to identify and describe the changes that occur across the life span; to explain these changes in the context of maturation, early learning, and societal factors impacting development; to review research and theoretical frameworks that have affected our way of thinking and, to study the interdependence and interrelatedness of all aspects of development. There is a 16-hour service learning/pre-practicum field experience as part of this course.
  • 3
    Focuses on providing students interested in elementary or secondary teaching with prerequisite skills necessary for successful student teaching. Students will demonstrate competence in: knowledge of curriculum, lesson and interdisciplinary unit planning, organizing and delivering instruction, adjusting instruction for diverse learning styles, individual needs and cultures, evaluating outcomes of instruction and use of a variety of classroom management strategies. Seminars will address issues related to teaching and emphasize student reflection and evaluation of their teaching. All students will be required to complete directed observation, participation and teaching in an assigned school. Discussions of ethical practices and professionalism will permeate the course. Prerequisite: ED 5270.
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  • 3
    This course is designed to assist candidates in acquiring the skills, knowledge and competencies necessary for curriculum development as it relates to special education and the general education curricula. Each participant will have the opportunity to examine models of curriculum-based assessment designed to generate better educational programs for students with disabilities. Each student will demonstrate an understanding of the instructional process with emphasis on students with disabilities. Keys to this understanding will include management considerations, instructional practices and evaluative and collaborative activities.
  • 3
    The emphasis throughout this course is on the practical application of appraisal techniques in education. Critical concepts related to assessment and the integration of assessment into teaching and learning include: the role of assessment in teaching, how validity is determined, factors influencing reliability, avoiding stereotypes, understanding and using numerical data, using standardized assessment to improve instruction, and ideas and strategies for mining and reporting assessment data.
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  • 3
    This course will focus on assessing curricula and assessment practices which correlate with state and national standards. Students will be introduced to a range of curriculum models. Various strategies and the administration of performance-based assessment will be studied. This course is designed for students in the Elementary and Secondary Teacher Certification programs.

Program of Study

  • Educational Leadership Component – 27 credits
  • 3
    Major functions concerning the supervision of staff in a school setting including the selection, orientation, and development of staff members will be covered. Theories and techniques for promoting a positive school climate will be explored and applied. Alternative approaches to assessing and enhancing a staff's instructional competence will be examined. Prerequisite: AD 5010.
  • 3
    Leading the participatory process for developing curricula in schools will be addressed. The relationship of philosophy, a school's identity, and mission to curricula is emphasized. Included are strategies for developing, assessing, and revising curricula as well as a review of recent research and trends. The course is intended for experienced educators who currently fill or aspire to the roles of school principal, team leader, or department chair. Prerequisite: AD 5010; to be taken concurrently with or after ED 5060.
  • 3
    ED 5XXX Elective in Curriculum, Instruction, or Assessment
  • 3
    In this course, students will explore major concepts related to developing partnerships and communities of learners. Course topics include the change process, forms of school and community governance, school culture, the concept of collaboration, and agencies and organizations involved in community programs and initiatives. Special attention is focused on planning and implementing system-wide and building-level networks. Students will develop and evaluate a framework for collaboration and demonstrate systems thinking. Typically the first course completed in the CAGS program.
  • 3
    This course focuses on the development of a self-renewing capability inherent in professionals and organizations. Students will discuss the notion of transformation in the context of knowledge base, self-reflection, and the socio-professional processes in educational change. Students will explore the integration of ecological perspectives within a changing society and the demand for greater tolerance of human behavior in the context of learning. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the need to keep student learning and development as the central core of educational change. Prerequisites: EP 7020 and EP 7040.
  • 3
    The purpose of this course is to develop effective collaborative planners. This course presents the major stages in the process of developing a strategic plan, including forming a mission statement, crafting and implementing the plan, and evaluating plan performance. It provides a theoretical and practical overview of the skills, strategies, and resources required through each stage of the systemic planning process. (Prerequisite: EP 7020).
  • 3
    This course addresses qualitative research methodologies with a particular emphasis on constructing grounded theory. Candidates will engage in the process, design, and critique of qualitative inquiry and research. Organizational and community issues will be explored and discovered through the analysis of patterns of beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors within interpersonal and intercultural contexts. The course includes theory and practice related to initiating an inquiry; gathering, recording and analyzing data; and evaluating a study. (Prerequisites: Eligibility for CAGS level coursework, and a graduate level course in research design).
  • 3
    This course presents a discussion of ways institutions and their communities must deal with the legal and political environment in which they exist. Topics include current legal issues and how the stakeholders in society can use the law as a tool for social change. Institutions must advocate for positive change through the development of thoughtful legal policies and practices.
  • 3
    Contemporary social, economical, political, and educational issues are the core of the course. They are identified in a forum that provides opportunities for the students to research current methodology together to address problems that relate to the specific roles of the course participants in their work inside or outside of the educational field. Working collaboratively, course candidates explore short-range and long range problem-solving strategies directed toward increasing their awareness of community perception and expectations, techniques for facilitating institutional change, and responding to the nature and culture of internal and external political systems and environments as they apply to their work sites.
  • Capstone Experience  – 6 credits
  • 6
    This course is designed as the culminating field experience for enrolled advanced graduate students seeking New Hampshire Department of Education (NHDOE) Certification as a K-12 Curriculum Administrator. The Practicum is a performance-based analysis of the role of the K-12 Curriculum Administrator in practice with emphasis on changes in society and schools as well as with reference to job responsibilities of the position - the art and science of school system leadership. Students enrolling in the practicum are expected to spend time interacting with a practicing curriculum administrator and completing a practicum project to fulfill requirements meeting state certification. Practicum readings and activities are designed to provide experiences relevant to building a required certification portfolio that demonstrates formal knowledge of executive leadership and management, dispositions (using that knowledge to reflect on experiences), and performances (school-based applications) as described in the Interstate School Leaders Licensure Consortium (ISLLC) Standards for School Leaders and New Hampshire Education Standards for Curriculum Administrator. Pre-requisites: Completion of required Curriculum Administrator coursework and permission of instructor.
  • Total for CAGS in Educational Leadership, K-12 Curriculum Administrator Concentration – 33 credits

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