Curriculum and Instruction

  • Curriculum and Instruction Component – 24 credits
  • 3
    This course addresses qualitative research methodologies with a particular emphasis on constructing grounded theory. Candidates will engage in the process, design, and critique of qualitative inquiry and research. Organizational and community issues will be explored and discovered through the analysis of patterns of beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors within interpersonal and intercultural contexts. The course includes theory and practice related to initiating an inquiry; gathering, recording and analyzing data; and evaluating a study. (Prerequisites: Eligibility for CAGS level coursework, and a graduate level course in research design).
  • 3
    This course provides an overview of the development and current status of higher education in the United States. Participants will review the historical evolution of higher education and the institutions' roles in American society. Higher education systems will be highlighted through both internal and external perspectives. Twenty-first century opportunities and challenges will be examined.
  • 3
    This course focuses on some of the most persistent legal and ethical issues that confront colleges and universities today. Information and activities associated with this course are designed to assist current and prospective college and university faculty and administrators to recognize the legal parameters around which decisions are made. A variety of topics will be addressed including, but not limited to: matters of academic freedom, intellectual property, and tenure; the authority of schools to discipline students for academic and/or behavioral misconduct; student privacy laws; sexual harassment; legal issues versus policy issues; and legislative, judicial, and executive actions impacting higher education.
  • 3
    In today's fast-paced, complex, and interdependent world it is more important than ever to work toward a common goal in learning organizations. This course embraces a systems view of learning at the organizational level. Students will compare, contrast, and critique theories and models of organizational learning, knowledge creation, and organizational capacity building and apply them to their own organizational settings. Course assignments will provide students with the opportunity to think systemically and develop a comprehensive understanding of the core competencies required to create and build cultures of learning with a shared vision. Special attention is focused on planning and implementing system-wide networks within a collaborative framework.
  • 3
    This course aspires to develop in students the needed concepts and technology skills for successful college teaching. It begins with a comprehensive theoretical and pedagogical foundation for helping instructors make critical decisions about the use of technology within the college curriculum. This practical and much needed resource discusses the relationship between knowledge, learning, teaching, and the nature of media; and demonstrates how this information should inform the use of technology in a teaching environment. This course guides students to formulate a teaching style that capitalizes on their individual personality and talent, integrates new technologies and methodologies in higher educational classrooms, and fulfills the needs of having a diverse instructional delivery for today's learning environments.
  • 3
    Educators in higher education teach populations of students with diverse backgrounds and different levels of preparation. In addition, faculty may be experts in their fields, but may not be experts with regard to how people learn. This course provides an overview of developmental, learning and instructional theories to consider when creating learning experiences for the post-secondary learner.
  • 3
    The educational system worldwide has undergone significant changes over the past decade. The classroom is no longer bound by four walls and students can interact with experts in any field via advances in technology. Explore innovations in curriculum, instruction, and assessment.
  • 3
    The course challenges students to reconsider the classroom teaching environment, their teaching styles and explore their capacities as teachers. Students will study new teaching methods, characteristics of effective teachers, and new teaching processes leading to more integrative and experiential learning. This course examines various teaching methods within the classroom and develops professional learning communities within schools. Each student will design/redesign, initiate and complete individual lesson plans or unit plans utilizing new teaching methodologies.
    • Elective Courses – 3-6 credits

To fulfill this specialization component, choose electives with your advisor that are relevant to your program of study.

  • Capstone Experience – 3-6 credits
  • 3-6
    An internship or practicum provides an important opportunity to develop the skills and dispositions necessary for successful teaching in higher education at the university, college or community college level. A mentored field experience provides a chance apply the knowledge and skills acquired through coursework throughout the degree program in a practical on-the-job environment in the field of higher education. Candidates will have the opportunity to develop their professional roles in the areas of teaching, scholarship, and service, under the guidance of faculty who are successful role models in higher education.
  • Minimum Total for CAGS in Higher Education, Curriculum and Instruction Concentration – 33 credits

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