Curriculum and Instruction

  • Prerequisite Coursework
  • A graduate-level research design course
  • An advanced graduate-level qualitative methodologies course
  • Curriculum and Instruction Component
  • 3
    This course provides an overview of the development and current status of higher education in the United States. Participants will review the historical evolution of higher education and the institutions' roles in American society. Higher education systems will be highlighted through both internal and external perspectives. Twenty-first century opportunities and challenges will be examined.
  • 3
    This course focuses on some of the most persistent legal and ethical issues that confront colleges and universities today. Information and activities associated with this course are designed to assist current and prospective college and university faculty and administrators to recognize the legal parameters around which decisions are made. A variety of topics will be addressed including, but not limited to: matters of academic freedom, intellectual property, and tenure; the authority of schools to discipline students for academic and/or behavioral misconduct; student privacy laws; sexual harassment; legal issues versus policy issues; and legislative, judicial, and executive actions impacting higher education.
  • 3
    This course aspires to develop in students the needed concepts and technology skills for successful college teaching. It begins with a comprehensive theoretical and pedagogical foundation for helping instructors make critical decisions about the use of technology within the college curriculum. This practical and much needed resource discusses the relationship between knowledge, learning, teaching, and the nature of media; and demonstrates how this information should inform the use of technology in a teaching environment. This course guides students to formulate a teaching style that capitalizes on their individual personality and talent, integrates new technologies and methodologies in higher educational classrooms, and fulfills the needs of having a diverse instructional delivery for today's learning environments.
  • 3
    Educators in higher education teach populations of students with diverse backgrounds and different levels of preparation. In addition, faculty may be experts in their fields, but may not be experts with regard to how people learn. This course provides an overview of developmental, learning and instructional theories to consider when creating learning experiences for the post-secondary learner.
  • 3

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  • 3
    To be an advocate of the arts must mean in some degree to have given thought to the very nature of the arts and their function in human development and culture. This course attempts through reading, discussion, writing, and forms of "doing art" to broadly circumscribe the nature of the arts and their function within the human experience. The readings will help facilitate seminar discussions designed to explore a variety of views about how the arts, once identified and defined within human experience and culture, contribute to human flourishing by opening up a more encompassing range of choices and possibilities. To be an advocate for the arts in this sense is to realize the intimate connections that the arts evoke, as well as to encourage the expansion of social vision through public forms of conduct and communication.
  • 3-6
    An internship or practicum provides an important opportunity to develop the skills and dispositions necessary for successful teaching in higher education at the university, college or community college level. A mentored field experience provides a chance apply the knowledge and skills acquired through coursework throughout the degree program in a practical on-the-job environment in the field of higher education. Candidates will have the opportunity to develop their professional roles in the areas of teaching, scholarship, and service, under the guidance of faculty who are successful role models in higher education.
  • Plus choose 1-2 elective courses from the list below:

  • 3
    An in-depth study of a particular topic, contemporary issue, or concern. The course will be taught by a specialist within the field being studied, or as an alternative methodology, a faculty member will coordinate a series of guest speakers who will address the topic. Since topics vary, the course may be repeated with permission of the instructor.
  • 3
    In today's fast-paced, complex, and interdependent world it is more important than ever to work toward a common goal in learning organizations. This course embraces a systems view of learning at the organizational level. Students will compare, contrast, and critique theories and models of organizational learning, knowledge creation, and organizational capacity building and apply them to their own organizational settings. Course assignments will provide students with the opportunity to think systemically and develop a comprehensive understanding of the core competencies required to create and build cultures of learning with a shared vision. Special attention is focused on planning and implementing system-wide networks within a collaborative framework.
  • 3
    Higher Education Administration and Organizational Management explores leadership and management concepts in higher education environments. The focus will be on factors influencing strategic level decision-making such as governance models, organizational structures, human resources, change management, and finances. Topics such as organizational behavior, leadership, communication, culture, and ethics will also be examined in support of student development of a personal management style.
  • 3
    This course is designed for higher education administrators and educators or those who aspire to positions in higher education. The economic, social, cultural, demographic and political forces that impact American Higher Education will be explored.
  • 3
    Transformative Research is an advanced course in research and evaluation methods appropriate for advanced graduate students. The intersection of applied social research and program evaluation will be explored, as well as researcher identity, developing a research focus, a transformative research and evaluation model, and qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods. Students will partner with a school or agency to develop a research project focused on the needs of the partner. The Transformative Approach to formulating research questions and developing original research will be emphasized, in alignment with our program?s hallmarks and the goal of preparing transformational leaders who can conduct, as described by Mertens (2009), culturally responsive research that places central importance on the lives and experiences of diverse communities, that seeks out those who are silent, involves those who are marginalized, and results in actions that further human rights and social justice. Prerequisite: A graduate level course in Research Design. Also offered as EP 7055.
    • Doctoral Core Component – 24 credits
    • 3
      Leaders play an important role in constructing, guiding, and improving learning in organizations. This course explores research-based discoveries and insights about the brain, learning, and development from multiple disciplines. Topics will include current developmental concepts as they are connected to understanding people, organizations, and policy settings. (Prerequisites: Member of the PSU EdD cohort).
    • 3
      This course engages students in understanding and using the theory and practice of program assessment and evaluation, including the effective communication of results. Students work directly with an agency or program to design an evaluation proposal. Various methodologies and approaches are investigated. Students discuss how to use data to inform decisions and to plan and assess programs. (Prerequisites: a research design course and a qualitative research course; member of the PSU EdD cohort).
    • 3
      This course focuses on ethical leadership and advocacy with an emphasis on personal and professional standards. Students apply ethical decision-making models to dilemmas drawn from professional contexts. The psychological and moral development needed to effectively advocate for social justice is considered. Students will demonstrate understanding of effective advocacy at the individual, community and socio-political levels. (Pre-requisite: Completion of EP 8000 and 8010 and member of the PSU EdD cohort).
    • 3
      Leaders often find themselves making decisions, facilitating programs, and mediating conflicts that emanate from the many ways in which humans differ, including ethnicity, race, religion, sexual orientation, and cultural beliefs. In this course, attention will be given to central topics and critical issues that address global leadership competencies in working with diverse populations. Students will critically examine the complexity of culture, the building of community, and the promotion of social justice from individual, community, and global perspectives. Furthermore, students will consider and evaluate both reactive and proactive roles for leaders in educational, social, and political settings. (Prerequisites: Completion of EP 8000 and 8010 and member of the PSU EdD cohort).
    • 3
      Leaders are expected to develop policies and implement practices that maximize the financial, environmental, material, technological, and human resources of their organization. Through the investigation of case studies, site visitations, and research, students will explore exemplary practices and potential approaches for the best use of an organization's resources. Topics will include: budgetary practices with high accountability factors, energy programs, recycling resources, employing technology while containing costs, and innovative personnel practices. (Prerequisites: Completion of EP 8020 and 8030 and member of the PSU EdD cohort).
    • 3
      Leaders are expected to facilitate the creation of a vision that drives their organization forward. Through readings, responses to interactive lectures, and participation in experiential exercises and group discussions, students will explore opportunities for restructuring organizations to create dynamic workplaces and synergistic organizations. Students will also examine present and emerging paradigms in the areas of behavioral science, psychology, and neuroscience so they may ascertain the impact of these belief systems on individuals and organizations. (Prerequisite: Completion of EP 8020 and 8030 and member of the PSU EdD cohort).
    • 3
      In this course, candidates are expected to craft a high quality comprehensive and compelling prospectus for their dissertation research proposal that is tailored to their interests and discipline. The seminar topics focus on helping students design a research study and write a dissertation proposal. (Prerequisites: Successful completion of these doctoral core courses: EP 8000, EP 8010, EP 8020, EP 8030, EP 8040, and EP 8050).
    • 3
      EP 8820 Externship
      The externship represents an important stage in the preparation of doctoral candidates. The externship provides an opportunity to explore and research topics of interest related to the dissertation at domestic and international locations outside the University. Externship placements allow candidates to gain new perspectives, sample different career paths, gather practical experience related to the dissertation and network with leaders in education and related fields. Candidates work with their instructor to establish the focus and site of the externship placement. Candidates develop and present their research project at the conclusion of the externship to faculty and peers. Students should be aware that a background check might be a requirement of certain externship sites. (Prerequisites: Successful completion of EP 8040, and permission of the instructor).
    • Dissertation – 9 credits
    • 3
      Dissertation courses serve as the culminating experience in the Doctor of Education program, building on research conducted throughout the coursework and resulting in extensive research and writing on a topic appropriate to a candidate's program, under direction of a Dissertation Chair and Committee. Candidates' projects demonstrate comprehensive understandings of the knowledge and practices of their selected field of study. Dissertation Block I is concerned with the completion of the Review of Literature chapter for the Dissertation. The dissertation research involves writing the proposal; writing the literature review and methods sections; collecting data and analyzing findings, and writing up the results and conclusions/discussions. (Prerequisites: Doctoral candidacy and completion of all coursework for doctoral degree).
    • 3
      These courses serve as culminating experiences in the Doctor of Education program, building on research conducted throughout the coursework and resulting in extensive research and writing on a topic appropriate to a candidate's program, under direction of a Dissertation Chair and Committee. Candidates' projects demonstrate comprehensive understandings of the knowledge and practices of their selected field of study. These doctoral seminars are organized into a sequence to support the writing of the dissertation and Dissertation Block II is concerned with completing the full Dissertation Proposal, which includes all of Chapters 1, 2 and 3 of the Dissertation. (Prerequisites: Doctoral candidacy and completion of all coursework for doctoral degree).
    • 3
      These courses serve as culminating experiences in the Doctor of Education program, building on research conducted throughout the coursework and resulting in extensive research and writing on a topic appropriate to a candidate's program, under direction of a Dissertation Chair and Committee. Candidates' projects demonstrate comprehensive understandings of the knowledge and practices of their selected field of study. These doctoral seminars are organized into a sequence to support the writing of the dissertation and this final block includes the completion of the entire Dissertation, including the public defense. (Prerequisites: Doctoral candidacy and completion of all coursework for doctoral degree).
    • Total for EdD in Higher Education, Curriculum and Instruction Concentration – 60 credits

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