Organizational Approaches to Transformation and Healing

If you value interpersonal relationships, social responsibility, and self-reflection, then the Organizational Approaches to Transformation and Healing (OATH) concentration is for you.

Learn about the integration of holistic approaches to leadership, and cultivate the qualities of a compassionate heart, open mind, and good intention. Through an examination of personal, organizational, and global contexts, you’ll develop into an agent of change in your working environment.

For those not interested in pursing the master’s degree, the 18-credit Organizational Approaches to Transformation and Healing Certificate program may be right for you.

For more information, visit the Counselor Education and School Psychology Department website.

  • Personal and Organizational Wellness Core – 12 credits
  • 3
    Exploration of the evolving and emerging paradigms of holistic health and healing, and how the personal and organizational realms interconnect. In addition to examining the traditional wellness models, discussions will include concepts of mind, transpersonal psychology and energetics. Through an examination of personal and organizational contexts, students will explore ways to transform personal and work environments through mindfulness towards good intention, open mind and compassionate heart.
  • 3
    Mindfulness Meditation Theory and Practice examines the theoretical basis for the use of meditation as a healing tool. In a meditative retreat format, participants learn and practice various types of meditation such as body scan, sitting, walking, eating and music meditation. Extended periods of practice and interspersed with discussion, reflection, presentation and small group work.
  • 3
    Transpersonal Psychology addresses aspects of mind and behavior that transcend individual ego and personal identity. This course considers the dimensions of consciousness, the implications of transpersonal experiences and the connection between psychology and spirituality. Class members gain an understanding of the fundamental assumptions underlying transpersonal theory and skills in applying theory to facilitate growth, health and well-being.
  • 3
    This course will illuminate the potential of research/inquiry to effect transformation in the research, participants, organizations, communities and cultures. Transformation manifests as meaningful and profound changes in one's attitudes and views of oneself as well as one's view of others and the world at large, which in turn catalyze consequential personal and organizational change and evolution. The transformative potential of research can be optimized through purposeful intention, careful design, and the deliberate inclusion of multiple ways of knowing. Through this course, students will explore and learn to use transformation-fostering research/inquiry approaches alone or in combination with traditional research methods as means for effecting personal and/or organizational transformation, health, and sustainability.
  • OATH Component – 12 credits
  • 3
    This course offers a study of a leadership model based on personal authenticity. The fundamental premise of this model is that effective leadership emerges from the synthesis and synergy of body, mind, heart and spirit to weave intention and presence into the organizational environment. Through varied learning methods participants will explore ways to foster culture that links knowledge and resources to promote a climate of transformative trust in the service of individual well being and the organizational mission.
  •  - OR
  • 3
    This course challenges women to consider the cultures, climates and contexts that limit and support their capacities as leaders. Students will explore personal leadership styles, characteristics of effective leaders, and strategies for developing themselves as leaders.
  • 3
    The 21st Century is a time of unprecedented change in which longstanding institutions are failing or deconstructing and the human race is facing enormous challenges. Such a time calls upon individuals and organizations to become activists for change and architects of new social constructions. Within this context, evolution and transformation are foundational processes for meaningful and contributory personal and organizational change. This course guides and assists participants in contextualizing change efforts in an awareness of global interconnectedness and concern for the long-term viability of humanity's partnership with the planet and in developing the habits of mind and heart which will enable them to lead with an open mind, compassionate heart, and good intention. Participants will explore emerging paradigms for leadership and change and use their learning to enhance organizational effectiveness, well being, and sustainability.
  • 3
    This course examines the role of "positive institutions" in creating and supporting the well-being of its members while maintaining its profitability or non-profit mission. Issues of power, privilege, and prejudice as challenges to the formation of ethical and socially just institutions will be explored. Topics include issues of diversity, equity, ethics, and social justice.
  • 3
    This course offers an exploration of the personal, interpersonal and transpersonal elements of work and personal growth. Through varied learning methods, participants will attend to the ways in which occupations transform us and how we transform our work to support personal development. Learning will extend to the ways in which we, as followers and leaders, can cooperate to support these synchronous and reciprocal processes creatively and with intention.
  • Elective Component – 6 credits
  • Choose with advisor
  • Capstone Component – 3 credits
  • 3
    The purpose of the graduate capstone is to apply knowledge learned in previous coursework through an approved project. Capstone projects should focus on the following questions: How will the theories learned throughout the program be integrated into a coherent project or experience? How will this work enhance individual career goals? Who are the stakeholders and how will this work assist them? How does this work serve the professional community? How will this work help move the profession forward? Process: Students should plan for approximately 40 hours of work per credit to be earned. The total number of credits earned must be approved by their advisor and noted on their program contract. Candidates must submit Graduate Capstone Project forms with their registration and Capstone Projects must be approved by candidates' advisors and the Associate Vice President for Graduate Studies. Once completed, candidates are expected to present their final products to their adviser and/or PSU faculty members. Students who anticipate working on their project for more than one term should register for the appropriate number of credits in each term so that they remain registered throughout the course of the project.
  • Total for MA in Personal and Organizational Wellness, OATH Concentration – 33 credits
Course Planning Matrix

Use the Course Planning Matrix to see when OATH/PATH courses will be offered.

Getting started is easy!

Apply today or request more info.

To begin planning your program, contact:

Nancy Puglisi, (603) 535-3116 or e-mail: npuglisi@plymouth.edu

Get started now!

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