MEd in Curriculum and Instruction

The Master of Education (MEd) in Curriculum and Instruction offers students the opportunity to explore new and emerging research-based practices in teaching and learning. Those wishing to improve their teaching skills and content knowledge are encouraged to pursue this option. Designed with the flexibility to meet the individual needs and interests of the adult learner, this option allows students to pursue various specialization areas to meet their professional goals.

Students may pursue the MEd in Curriculum and Instruction with no concentration (see the program of study on this page below) or with one of the following concentrations:

Note: Students may also pursue the MEd in Curriculum and Instruction through partnership agreements with Maricopa Community Colleges and Pima Community College in Arizona. Learn more.

For more information, visit the Educational Leadership, Learning and Curriculum Department website.

Program of Study

  • Master’s Core Component – 15 credits
  • 3
    Seeks to examine the manner in which the behavior, feelings, or thoughts of one individual are influenced by the behavior or characteristics of others. Topics to be considered include social perception, attitudes, gender, social cognition, conflict, social influence, intercultural awareness, prejudice, discrimination, aggression, and group behavior. Fall, spring, and summer.
  • - OR -
  • 3
    This course will provide an in-depth study of the social/cultural basis of behavior and examine the role of mythology as a vehicle for intrapersonal and interpersonal understanding. The major theoretical, empirical, and applied lines of work in the following topics in contemporary social psychology will be explored, including social cognition, interpersonal perception, attitudes, stereotyping and prejudice, the self, and interpersonal and group relations. Mythology will be employed as a mechanism for cross-cultural comparison and as a unifying construct to enhance multicultural understanding.
  • 3
    A study of the historical, philosophical, and social-philosophic foundations of education. Emphasis is placed upon the ideas of the classical, medieval, Enlightenment, and post-Enlightenment periods that have influenced types of American educational systems relative to their mission and purpose. Analysis of how these systems have defined ethics and the characteristics of the virtuous person.
  • 3
    Knowledge and understanding of the commonly accepted research designs. Study of research instruments and statistics used in educational research. Wide reading in various types of research design. Critical analysis of research design.
  • 3
    An overview of current theories concerning the brain, development, and learning. Analysis of developmental concepts from birth through adolescence and adulthood. Discussion of language acquisition, thinking and learning styles, multiple intelligence, and creativity. Topics include teaching, learning, and assessment issues related to cultural diversity, technology, and learning differences.
  • 3
    The emphasis throughout this course is on the practical application of appraisal techniques in education. Critical concepts related to assessment and the integration of assessment into teaching and learning include: the role of assessment in teaching, how validity is determined, factors influencing reliability, avoiding stereotypes, understanding and using numerical data, using standardized assessment to improve instruction, and ideas and strategies for mining and reporting assessment data.
  • - OR -
  • 3
    This course will focus on assessing curricula and assessment practices which correlate with state and national standards. Students will be introduced to a range of curriculum models. Various strategies and the administration of performance-based assessment will be studied. This course is designed for students in the Elementary and Secondary Teacher Certification programs.
    • Specialization Component – 15 credits

Electives to be determined with advisor.

  • Capstone Experience – 3 credits
  • 3
    The purpose of the graduate capstone is to apply knowledge learned in previous coursework through an approved project. Capstone projects should focus on the following questions: How will the theories learned throughout the program be integrated into a coherent project or experience? How will this work enhance individual career goals? Who are the stakeholders and how will this work assist them? How does this work serve the professional community? How will this work help move the profession forward? Process: Students should plan for approximately 40 hours of work per credit to be earned. The total number of credits earned must be approved by their advisor and noted on their program contract. Candidates must submit Graduate Capstone Project forms with their registration and Capstone Projects must be approved by candidates' advisors and the Associate Vice President for Graduate Studies. Once completed, candidates are expected to present their final products to their adviser and/or PSU faculty members. Students who anticipate working on their project for more than one term should register for the appropriate number of credits in each term so that they remain registered throughout the course of the project.
  • Total for MEd in Curriculum and Instruction – 33 credits

Getting started is easy!

Apply today or request more info.

 

Get started now!

Experience a great career at Plymouth State University

Current Students

Register for classes, check grades, apply for financial aid, find campus events, and more!
Visit myPlymouth

Make a gift to Plymouth State University