MEd in Heritage Studies

Heritage Studies explores the intricate relationships and subjects of identity, memory, intangibility/tangibility, dissonance and place. It is a multidisciplinary program in understanding the construction of heritage within the social sciences. Using place-based methods, our accomplished faculty including folklorists and archivists will explore a number of heritage landscapes to uncover the meanings of what is a living heritage.

In this flexible master’s degree program, students may design a program of study based on their personal or professional interests, using local, national, and global cultures as inspiration. The program consists of three core education courses, two Heritage Studies courses, an elective component, and an internship or practicum. Students in this degree program could expect to complete coursework within two years.

Graduates of this program work in a variety of settings including museums, public and private schools, tourist destinations, and libraries and historical societies. Some teach, while others conduct research and manage heritage materials and sites.

  • Master’s Core Component – 9 credits
  • 3
    Seeks to examine the manner in which the behavior, feelings, or thoughts of one individual are influenced by the behavior or characteristics of others. Topics to be considered include social perception, attitudes, gender, social cognition, conflict, social influence, intercultural awareness, prejudice, discrimination, aggression, and group behavior. Fall, spring, and summer.
  • - OR -
  • 3
    This course will provide an in-depth study of the social/cultural basis of behavior and examine the role of mythology as a vehicle for intrapersonal and interpersonal understanding. The major theoretical, empirical, and applied lines of work in the following topics in contemporary social psychology will be explored, including social cognition, interpersonal perception, attitudes, stereotyping and prejudice, the self, and interpersonal and group relations. Mythology will be employed as a mechanism for cross-cultural comparison and as a unifying construct to enhance multicultural understanding.
  • 3
    A study of the historical, philosophical, and social-philosophic foundations of education. Emphasis is placed upon the ideas of the classical, medieval, Enlightenment, and post-Enlightenment periods that have influenced types of American educational systems relative to their mission and purpose. Analysis of how these systems have defined ethics and the characteristics of the virtuous person.
  • 3
    Knowledge and understanding of the commonly accepted research designs. Study of research instruments and statistics used in educational research. Wide reading in various types of research design. Critical analysis of research design.
  • Professional Component – 6 credits
  • 3
    Heritage Studies Foundations is designed for those interested in bringing heritage studies to areas such as schools, museums, and historical societies. Relevant concepts and techniques used in history, geography, English, anthropology, and sociology will be presented so participants may create models for class exercises, build museum exhibits, and incorporate heritage studies methodology into their work. Participants will learn methods of social science interpretation and inference about historical events, structures, artifacts, settlement patterns, and various ideologies of the past. Multi-disciplinary techniques will be used in interpretations of nearby history and in the development of materials that may be used in educating the general public and students in the classroom.
  • 3
    In this course the European origins and international conventions of the world heritage movement are examined. Several international sites are studied in depth through slides and discussion. Sites in the United States are also considered as are issues of natural versus cultural sites and cultural resource management. Two field trips are required.
    • Elective Component – 15 credits

With the help of an advisor, choose 15 credits from: heritage studies, anthropology, geography, history, political science, and sociology.

  • 3
    This course traces the history of native cultures in North America with an accent on the northeastern region for teachers and other educators. Various Indian cultures will be described in traditional anthropological categories such as language, kinship, religion, politics and subsistence. Cultural change, relativism, ethnocentrism and social conflict are some of the topics used to understand their culture from the past into the present.
  • 3
    Specialized topics chosen for graduate seminar by individual faculty. Scheduled as needed.
  • 1-3
    Independent study provides students with the opportunity to round out their background in anthropology through reading and research that supplements previous coursework in the field. A research paper, periodic conferences and an oral examination may be required. Consent of a faculty supervisor, the Department Chair and the Associate Vice President of the College of Graduate Studies is required.
  • 3
    An in-depth study of a particular topic, contemporary issue or concern. Taught by a specialist within the field being studied or as an alternative methodology. Since topics may vary, the course may be repeated with permission of the instructor.
  • 2-9
    Depending on the investigative circumstances, provides an opportunity to acquire field experience--survey, mapping, excavation, material analysis--at land or underwater sites from either the prehistoric or historical periods. Summer and Winter only.
  • 2-9
    Depending on the investigative circumstances, provides an opportunity to acquire field experience - survey, mapping, excavation, material analysis - at land or underwater sites from either the prehistoric or historical periods.
  • 2-9
    Provides an opportunity to acquire experience in prehistoric archaeological interpretation. Students will perform an analysis of prehistoric archaeological materials and will produce an interpretive report based upon their studies. This course will be held in the New Hampshire Division of Historical Resources laboratory in Concord, N.H. Students must provide their own transportation to and from Concord. Repeatable for credit. Winterim.
  • 3
    A methodological study of selected topics such as the geography of tourism, landforms, education, economic activity and geographic information systems.
  • 1-3
    Provides students with the opportunity to round out their background in the social sciences through reading and research, supplementing previous course work in the field. A research paper, periodic conferences and an oral examination may be required. Consent of a faculty supervisor, department chair and the Associate Vice President is required.
  • 3
    Studying New Hampshire and New England history allows students to learn more about a particular region and to see how past events and movements at the local level interacted with or were influenced by various events and cultural changes on the national and international levels. Topics covered will create an awareness of the place of New Hampshire and New England in the various events that make up United States History.
  • 4
    This purpose of this course is twofold: to introduce students to a variety of locations and historic sites throughout New England; and to allow students to analyze the historical significance of each site and use the knowledge gained to produce papers and projects useful to the student's career while furthering their research and writing skills. Many historical sites are within easy travel distance and convey the nature of change since the earliest settlement in the region. This will allow students the opportunity to explore and interpret the layered historical landscape.
  • 3
    Specialized topics chosen for graduate seminar by individual faculty. Unscheduled.
  • 1-3
    Provides students with the opportunity to round out their background in the social sciences through reading and research, supplementing previous course work in the field. A research paper, periodic conferences and an oral examination may be required. Consent of a faculty supervisor, department chair and the Associate Vice President is required.
  • 3
    Various approaches to the study of politics, particularly functional, geographical or theoretical problems and issue areas will be selected from time to time. These will serve as the topics to provide intellectual focus for advanced application of the political science method to the study of man. Unscheduled.
  • 1-3
    Provides students with the opportunity to round out their background in the social sciences through reading and research, supplementing previous course work in the field. A research paper, periodic conferences and an oral examination may be required. Consent of a faculty supervisor, department chair and the Associate Vice President is required.
  • 3
    Specialized topic chosen for Graduate Seminar by individual faculty. Scheduled as needed.
  • 1-3
    Independent study provides students with the opportunity to round out their background in sociology through reading and research that supplements previous coursework in the field. A research paper, periodic conferences and an oral examination may be required. Consent of a faculty supervisor, the Department Chair and the Associate Vice President of the College of Graduate Studies is required.
  • Capstone Experience – 3-4 credits
  • 3-4
    Advanced students and teachers in Heritage Studies with at least 15 graduate credits can start their internship placement. Individual placement with an organization/institution must be arranged through the director of Heritage Studies the term before starting work. The type of work will be determined by the interest of the individual and the needs of the organization. Creation of outreach programs, field trips, tours, displays, exhibits, workshops, theme interpretations or research utilizing resources of the organization/institution to educate the public on any topic in Heritage Studies. Prerequisite: 15 graduate credits or more in Heritage Studies.
  • Total for MEd in Heritage Studies – 33 credits

Completing your degree at Plymouth State is more convenient than ever because we offer courses on- and off-campus in Plymouth, Concord, and Waterville Valley. Evening and weekend class times, intensive institutes, and online classes allow you to take courses while working full time.

With rolling admission, you may start your program during any term. In fact, you may take up to 12 credits before even being admitted to Plymouth State. Financial aid is available to qualified students.

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