TESOL Education (non-certification)

The Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) Education non-certification program, like the K–12 certification option, is grounded in linguistics, language acquisition, TESOL methodology, multi-cultural learning, language assessment and literacy, as well as technology and foundations of teaching and curriculum design. The program enables students to focus additional time, depending on their area of interest, on adult education, technology, assessment, literacy, special needs, classroom practices or classroom-based research.

Interested in gaining TESOL Education K-12 certification? Please refer to that specific program of study.

Not sure which TESOL program is right for you? Frequently Asked Questions.

Course Planning Matrix

Use the Course Planning Matrix to see when TESOL courses will be offered.

Program of Study

  • Learner and Learning Component – 6 credits
  • 3
    This course examines the importance of cultural perspectives in language education for non-native speakers. Emphasis is placed on understanding the role of acculturation on academic success, and programmatic alternatives and pedagogy for English language learners in a pluralistic society. The course explores the impact of cultural backgrounds of language-minority students and their families, and their adjustment to a new society, on language acquisition and academic achievement.
  • 3
    The course focuses on the nature and process of learning in adulthood, especially in formal learning situations in business, industry, adult basic education, and adult higher education. Also emphasizes the concept of learning how to learn and the ways in which adults function in independent learning situations. We will examine theory, research, and practice from several different discipline perspectives to answer the question: "How do adults learn?"
  • - OR -
  • 3
    An overview of current theories concerning the brain, development, and learning. Analysis of developmental concepts from birth through adolescence and adulthood. Discussion of language acquisition, thinking and learning styles, multiple intelligence, and creativity. Topics include teaching, learning, and assessment issues related to cultural diversity, technology, and learning differences.
  • Content Component – 6 credits
  • 3
    This course will examine the nature of first and second language acquisition and development. Topics include first language acquisition, second language acquisition by children and adults, bilingualism, and their applications to language teaching. The course provides an overview of current theories of language acquisition.
  • 3
    Provides prospective language teachers with an introduction to the study of language. Principal topics include sociolinguistic theories, language variation, and pragmatics; and the classroom implications of phonology, morphology, semantics and syntax.
  • Instructional Practice Component – 12 credits
  • 3
    An introduction to the teaching profession and the realities of teaching in today's schools. A series of seminars includes such topics as the history and structure of education, societal issues, the role of the teacher, instructional planning, legal rights and responsibilities of students and teachers, learning styles and effective teaching. A school observation/participation experience of a minimum of 30 hours is required.
  • - OR -
  • 3
    This course builds on adult learning theory and examines the role of the instructor as the facilitator of learning. Major focus is on incorporating strategies for encouraging active learning, collaboration, self-directed learning, and self assessment by learners into a variety of learning situations. Class participants will be involved in demonstrating teaching methodologies and receiving feedback from group members.
  • 3
    Participants learn the foundations of communicative language teaching to non-native speakers in multicultural and homogenous classrooms. Topics include content-based instruction, teaching of the four skills, curriculum development, and lesson planning and execution. Participants acquire and practice the skills needed to teach language to students of all ages and abilities.
  • 3
    Participants in this course examine the theories and practice of second language reading and writing acquisition. Topics include developing literate behaviors, decoding, guided reading, shared reading and writing, and the writing process. The focus of the course is to develop participants' proficiency in teaching reading and writing to students of different ages and ability levels through phonics, whole language, and integrated approaches.
  • 3
    Participants in this course explore different approaches for creating, evaluating, and scoring both formal and informal language assessment measures for students of different ages and ability levels. Topics include authentic communicative assessment measures; portfolio assessment, standardized testing, test biases and testing different skills. This course foregrounds authentic and useful classroom language assessment measures.
  • - OR -
  • 3
    The emphasis throughout this course is on the practical application of appraisal techniques in education. Critical concepts related to assessment and the integration of assessment into teaching and learning include: the role of assessment in teaching, how validity is determined, factors influencing reliability, avoiding stereotypes, understanding and using numerical data, using standardized assessment to improve instruction, and ideas and strategies for mining and reporting assessment data.
    • Elective Component – 9 credits
    • Choose one of the following
    • 3
      The evolution of the World Wide Web from what is being called Web 1.0 to Web 2.0 has brought about a new way of teaching and learning in this digital age. The use of Web 2.0 tools such as blogs, wikis, podcasting, videocasting, and a host of other free tools are allowing educators to connect to knowledge and each other like never before. Learners will gain hands-on experiences with Web 2.0 tools and explore the learning theory that supports their use a networked classroom environment.
    • 3
      This instructional technology course is designed to provide technology educators, School Media Specialists, K-12 educators, and administrators with an understanding of ways current and emerging technologies can be used to facilitate teaching, learning, and managing instruction. Discussions will focus on issues, trends, and current uses of technology in K-12 education. Sessions will focus upon gaining experience integrating digital technology within the Common Core Standards, evaluating web 2.0 tools, exploring video resources, and designing technology enhanced lessons utilizing digital storytelling for K-12 curriculum integration.
    • 3
      This collaborative, project based online course will provide K-12 educators with a framework, information and resources necessary to explore, create and share multimedia content globally; to use multimedia to communicate and participate in authentic, interactive, networked learning communities, to inspire and motivate student learning. Exploring a variety of online resources and tools, students will collaborate in an online, constructivist environment to create a multimedia based authentic project. Educators will share how they integrate multimedia across the curriculum, using the National Education Technology Standards (NETS) for Students as a foundation with a focus on media literacy.
    • 3
      The Web-Enhanced Classroom is a six week course that uses technology to enhance traditional face-to-face (f2f) instruction. Online material is viewed as an extension of the classroom, and traditional lectures or classroom activities are linked with enhancements such as virtual tours, WebQuests, real-time information, maps, pictures, streaming video, audio clips, and open source course components. Web-extended classrooms allow learning to happen in an interesting and exciting way. This course provides teachers with the opportunity to develop a complete unit of study for a web-extended classroom and view other units created by peers. The unit of study is developed using the internet and includes information about open source portal components, while the educator learns how to efficiently and effectively search the web for resources. The topic for the unit of study is of the educator's choice; some resources will be provided through virtual tours of websites.
    • 3
      Educators need to integrate technology into their curriculum to transform student learning and meet the goals of the 21st Century. To succeed in today's information-driven academic environment, students need to know how to find, use, manage, evaluate and convey information efficiently and effectively. This includes not only knowledge of technology, but the ability to use critical-thinking skills to solve problems within a technological environment. Teachers wrap 21st Century Literacy skills into lesson content using a variety of strategies. This course helps educators plan and assess effective technology teaching methods, incorporate technology into any discipline, and develop key accountability and assessment strategies. In this six week course, educators wear both a "student hat" and a "teacher hat" as they use digital technology and communication tools to solve an information problem. Educators experience how to use technology as a tool to research, organize, evaluate and communicate information as well as develop a fundamental understanding of the ethical/legal issues surrounding the access and use of information. This valuable, first-hand experience demonstrates the essential technology skills students need to succeed in the 21st Century.
    • 3
      This course provides an in-depth look of the use of technology with diverse learners. An overview of two federal laws (IDEA and NCLB) and the examination of the research of learning technologies will be presented. Students will be engaged in hands-on experience with desktop software, online resources and specialized software designed to support diverse learners. Opportunities will be provided for students to develop classroom activities and curriculum planning guidelines for integrating technology tools into the content areas to accommodate a range of student learning differences.
    • Choose two of the following (or any class listed above not already taken)
    • 3
      This course will focus on assessing curricula and assessment practices which correlate with state and national standards. Students will be introduced to a range of curriculum models. Various strategies and the administration of performance-based assessment will be studied. This course is designed for students in the Elementary and Secondary Teacher Certification programs.
    • 3
      This introductory course will cover the following areas: definition of LD, reading problems, language deficits both oral and written, mathematics underachievement, social skills deficits, attention and behavioral problems, academic achievement, and comorbidity with other disabilities, prevalence, environmental factors, standardized, criterion referenced, informal reading, curriculum-based measurement, and testing. Educational approaches such as explicit instruction, content enhancement, and placement alternatives will be explored. Current issues and future trends in the field of LD will be discussed.
    • 3
      Focuses on providing students interested in elementary or secondary teaching with prerequisite skills necessary for successful student teaching. Students will demonstrate competence in: knowledge of curriculum, lesson and interdisciplinary unit planning, organizing and delivering instruction, adjusting instruction for diverse learning styles, individual needs and cultures, evaluating outcomes of instruction and use of a variety of classroom management strategies. Seminars will address issues related to teaching and emphasize student reflection and evaluation of their teaching. All students will be required to complete directed observation, participation and teaching in an assigned school. Discussions of ethical practices and professionalism will permeate the course. Prerequisite: ED 5270.
    • 3
      To provide literacy instructors with practical suggestions, approaches, and tools to engage all K-12 students, including adolescents themselves, in focusing on improving student reading, writing, thinking, and listening. A three tiered model will examine the areas of student motivation, integrating literacy and learning, and sustaining literacy development. The final product will be the formation of a differentiated instructional plan in the content area demonstrating the use of strategies presented in the course. Participants will be using their own existing school curricula or be planning to use the strategies with future students. A district wide presentation can be developed from the culmination of all student's artifacts.
    • 3
      Research in Reading and Writing is an investigation into the significant research theory and principles on the development of reading and writing, the teaching of reading and writing, the assessment of reading and writing, and the implications of this knowledge that enrich our understandings and refine our practices. From historical perspectives to current trends and issues, we will explore the transformation of the reading and writing landscape. In doing so, we will discover what research in reading and writing is; how it is used; the value of reading and writing research; how it is applied to improve practice, understanding, and reflective thought; and its role in determining best institutional practices.
    • 3
      In this course students will study the foundations of language/literacy processes and instruction. Topics include the psychological, cultural, and linguistic theoretical foundations; current practices, research, and historical developments; reading and writing language development related to their acquisition as well as cultural and linguistic diversity; major components of reading curriculum; major components of writing instruction; reading and writing instructional strategies and curriculum materials. The course will be in an interactive seminar/workshop format with an online component.
    • 3
      This course is designed to provide a background in qualitative classroom-based research. Students design a research project in which they find and frame a research question that they will investigate through interview, observations, participant observations and/or analysis of artifacts. They will write up and present the results of this limited study.
    • 3
      This course is designed especially for mainstream teachers who want to know more about how to better meet the needs of English language learners (ELLs) in their classroom. It provides an in-depth examination of widely-used, evidence-based techniques for teaching non-native speakers of English within the mainstream classroom. In addition to an overview of current theories for teaching English language learners, the course foregrounds strategies and practical hands-on ways for engaging, teaching and assessing ELLs within the K-12 mainstream classroom. Participants gain a theoretical grounding as well as practice with scaffolding content for language learners, and developing individualized learner strategies. This course includes instruction in using CALLA, the Cognitive Academic Language Learning Approach, and SIOP (Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol), with ELLs.
    • 3

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    • Professional Responsibility Component – 3 credits
    • 3
      This practicum serves as field experience for ESOL certification candidates and for students taking a self-designed M.Ed. with a concentration in TESOL but without K-12 certification. A candidate seeking ESOL teacher certification must do the practicum in a New Hampshire public school; a candidate not seeking ESOL teacher certification can do the practicum in any approved setting. Commitment includes regular meetings with the course instructor and the development of a professional portfolio that fulfills all NH required teacher competencies. Supervision will be done jointly by the cooperating institution and Plymouth State University faculty. Permission of instructor is required.
    • Total for MEd in Language Education, TESOL Education (non-certification) – 36 credits

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