MEd in School Psychology

The Master of Education (MEd) in School Psychology is a 69-credit program designed for individuals who desire certification in school psychology at the state and national level. Those candidates who already possess a master’s degree in a related field will want to explore the post-master’s CAGS or professional certification program. Candidates are expected to possess strong interpersonal skills.

For more information, visit the Counselor Education and School Psychology Department website.

  • Foundation Component – 27 credits
  • 3
    Recognizing that social behavior occurs within an intercultural context, Counselor Education, Couples and Family Therapy, and School Psychology students will develop the basic knowledge foundations necessary to understand and influence social behavior in a diverse society. Texts, readings and learning modules have been chosen and/or designed to facilitate the student's ability to understand the nature of social behavior cross culturally.
  • 3
    Focuses on a life-span approach to human development and looks at the constancy and change in behavior throughout life, from conception to death. Students will study human development in the context of a multidisciplinary approach and the larger ecological context of developmental events in human behavior. This course will have four major concerns: to identify and describe the changes that occur across the life span; to explain these changes in the context of maturation, early learning, and societal factors impacting development; to review research and theoretical frameworks that have affected our way of thinking and, to study the interdependence and interrelatedness of all aspects of development. There is a 16-hour service learning/pre-practicum field experience as part of this course.
  • 3
    This course is designed to familiarize students with a variety of research principles, ethical and legal considerations, research design, methodologies of research, data analyses, and principles of program evaluation. In addition, students will be able to critically evaluate research literature, understand basics of writing a literature review, and principles outlined in the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association. As a result, students will be prepared to understand available research, act on that knowledge in being discriminate evaluators of research and in being able to design research projects.
  • 3
    Psychopharmacology and the Biological Basis of Mental Health course will explore the biological influences on mental illness. This will include an examination of the physiological basis of behavior, perception, emotion and self-regulation; the current theory and research on the relationship between biological events in the central nervous system and behavior; and psychopharmacological interventions.
  • 3
    This course is designed to be a comparative and critical in-depth analysis of personality and counseling theories, including interrelationships, philosophical foundations, and practical application. Individual, familial, and systemic models are presented along with dynamics and issues that reflect cross theoretical perspectives. Students will be required to compare and contrast counseling theories and strategies, consider appropriate application of these strategies in diverse populations, and develop a personal model for providing help and facilitating behavioral change.
  • 3
    This course is designed to help students understand the foundational models and associated techniques of relational therapy and counseling youth. Basic principles, concepts, and assumptions inherent in each of the foundational models will be explored as well as the implications for practice. Issues that affect contemporary families and youth and the associated empirically validated treatment will be explored. Required course for MS students in the clinical mental health counseling and couples and family therapy tracks. Prerequisites CO 5010 or SY 6010 and CO 5260, or permission of the instructor.
  • - OR -
  • 3
    Focuses on developing competency in a variety of areas surrounding parenting education including the following: understanding of parental issues and concerns within diverse family systems, understanding the dimensions of parenting from birth to adolescence, family, literacy, and knowledge of multicultural perspectives in parenting. This course addresses U.N. resolutions A/52/13 A Culture of Peace and A/53/243 A Program of Action for a Culture of Peace.
  • 3
    Course provides a clear, balanced presentation of the psychology of abnormal behavior including current theoretical models, research, clinical experiences, therapies and controversies. Enables student to understand psychological/psychiatric disorders as discrete clinical conditions and to be able to apply differential diagnoses. Fall. Prerequisite: CO5010 or SY6010 or permission of instructor.
  • 3
    An overview of current theories concerning the brain, development, and learning. Analysis of developmental concepts from birth through adolescence and adulthood. Discussion of language acquisition, thinking and learning styles, multiple intelligence, and creativity. Topics include teaching, learning, and assessment issues related to cultural diversity, technology, and learning differences.
  • 3
    This introductory course will cover the following areas: definition of LD, reading problems, language deficits both oral and written, mathematics underachievement, social skills deficits, attention and behavioral problems, academic achievement, and comorbidity with other disabilities, prevalence, environmental factors, standardized, criterion referenced, informal reading, curriculum-based measurement, and testing. Educational approaches such as explicit instruction, content enhancement, and placement alternatives will be explored. Current issues and future trends in the field of LD will be discussed.
  • - OR -
  • 3
    This course is designed to provide the student with advanced diagnostic skills in learning disabilities. Participants are expected to have some prior knowledge of standardized assessment practices, learning challenges of children, teaching methods and curriculum in general and special education. A profile of specific learning disability characteristics will be presented with corresponding assessment methods including formal assessment, responsiveness to intervention models, diagnostic prescriptive teaching and remedial programs. This course will present the above topics paying special attention to focusing on placing them within the context of the NCATE/CEC standards below. Specific evaluation methods to include standardized assessment (Woodcock-Johnson Psychoeducational Battery-III, Wechsler Individual Achievement Test II, Responsiveness to Intervention, Curriculum Based Measurement, Visual Aural Digit Span Test, Jordan Left-Right Reversal Test, Test of Written Language-3, CTOPP, etc.)
  • Professional Component – 42 credits
  • 3
    The course is designed to help students develop basic counseling skills. Through role play, practice interviews, and tape transcriptions, students will have the opportunity to learn and practice basic counseling skills. The relationships among theory, case conceptualizations, and counseling interventions will be examined. Ethical and culturally responsive practices will be emphasized. Prerequisites: CO 5010 or SY 6010.
  • 3
    This course is designed to help students develop basic approaches, techniques, and advocacy for counseling children and adolescents. The course emphasizes student conceptualization of common issues, pathology, and behavior that occur in youth and the application of therapeutic skills and techniques to utilize when intervening. The course also emphasizes the therapeutic involvement of significant others with children in a variety of systems. Required course for students in the school counseling, marriage and family therapy, and school psychology programs. Prerequisite: CO 5010 or SY 6010, CO 5260, CO 5050, CO 5020, or permission of the instructor.
  • 3
    Analysis of models and dynamics involved in planning, teaching, and evaluating environments for special needs students. An overview of special education, characteristics of individuals with disabilities, individualized educational plans, functional behavior assessment, practical teaching strategies, and the New Hampshire Special Education Process and Policies. An observation component of 15 hours will be required of all students not presently in a school or teaching situation.
  • 3
    This survey course will introduce students to the role and function of the school psychologist. Historical events will be reviewed with an emphasis on future directions of the profession. Prevention and intervention as a part of a data based problem-solving model to address learning, behavior, and social/emotional issues in school age children will be introduced. Legal issues and professional ethics will be discussed. Students will become familiar with the educational environment and the role of the school psychologist within the educational system. The Mahara e-portfolio will be introduced. Students will address New Hampshire state standards for school psychology with the National Association of School Psychologist Domains of Practice (2010). There is a 25-hour pre-practicum to the course.
  • 3
    This course is designed to provide students with a clear, balanced presentation of the behavioral technology including theoretical paradigms, assessment methods, intervention planning and techniques, and the application of behavioral methodologies designed to increase prosocial effective behaviors and decrease and/or eliminate socially ineffective behaviors within the school setting. Prerequisite SY 6010.
  • 3
    To provide a clear, balanced presentation of the learner's social/emotional characteristics. The student will be introduced to the areas of assessment of behavior by interview, observation and norm-referenced techniques. Functional behavior assessment will also be addressed. Objective and projective techniques will be introduced and the student will have the opportunity to learn about the history and practical administration of these instruments. Prerequisite SY 6010 and admittance to the School Psychology program.
  • 3
    Students will learn about the history and theories of intelligence testing. They will develop the skill to administer two norm-referenced intelligence tests (Child and Adult Editions of Wechsler Scales), interpret the results, and write and present cogent results of their findings as it relates to the child adolescent and their learning. This course prepares school psychology candidates for the internship where they will gain proficiency in assessing cognitive ability. Prerequisite SY 6010 and admittance to the School Psychology Program.
  • 3
    This course prepares the school psychology student to become proficient in educational assessment, instructional interventions, and consultation. School psychology candidates will acquire skills in academic assessment, consultation, and prevention and intervention strategies. Students will learn to administer and interpret normative and criterion measures; prepare comprehensive case studies, which include the assessment, interpretation, intervention, and program monitoring of school-age children; conduct an evaluation of published curricula and utilize curriculum-based measurement techniques. Students will also become knowledgeable about ethical standards and principles related to assessment. Prerequisite: SY 6010 and admittance to the School Psychology program.
  • 3
    This three-credit practicum involves 50 clock hours at a field site under the supervision of a certified school psychologist. It is intended for candidates to practice their skills in assessment, consultation, counseling, prevention, and intervention. An on-campus seminar will focus on advanced topics in school psychology practice and provide candidates an opportunity to demonstrate their skills, review cases, and share their experiences from their field placement. (Candidates should arrange their practicum placement prior to the beginning of the course to ensure a full semester experience.)
  • 3
    Practicum II: Integration and Case Studies involves 50 hours at a field site under the supervision of a certified school psychologist. It is intended for candidates to develop a comprehensive and holistic perspective that combines early intervention, prevention, counseling, assessment, consultation, community resources, and systems interventions as they relate to individual case studies. Candidates will follow two or more children encompassing the entire special education process from the pre-referral stage to placement progress monitoring, and documenting the entire sequence including the extent to which those children have demonstrated specific measurable outcomes. An on-campus seminar will be given for candidates to discuss their experiences during the steps of their case studies and to supplement their practicum experience with related readings and discussion. This practicum will accommodate both models of special education identification (traditional assessment and response to intervention). Candidates will also present videos of their consultation skills and demonstrate knowledge of the ability to plan, coordinate and implement a psychological services delivery model within a school setting that includes assessment, pre-referral problem solving, crisis intervention, mental health intervention, functional skill training, collaboration, consultation, referral and counseling. Candidates should arrange their practicum placement six months prior to the beginning of the course to ensure a full semester experience.
  • 12
    As the culminating component in the school psychology program, this field experience will be done in a public school setting under the supervision of a certified school psychologist. Students will also attend a seminar on campus to discuss their experiences, present psychological evaluations and interventions, and engage in mutual problem solving relative to dilemmas and issues encountered in the field experience. Prerequisites include completion of all required courses and permission of the internship instructor. Students are required to take the Praxis II exam.

Students with degrees in non-related areas complete the full program minus equivalent transfer courses. Students with related master’s degrees take only the courses needed for the conversion.

  • Total for MEd School Psychology – 69 credits

Note: Students who complete the program may wish to apply for national certification, which is granted by the National School Psychology Certification Board and is called NCSP for the Nationally Certified School Psychologist. The University’s school psychology graduate program has been approved by the New Hampshire Department of Education.

Course Planning Matrix

Use the Course Planning Matrix to see when School Psychology courses will be offered.

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