March 26th, 2013

March 26th, 2013 by Sherri

Also making an appearance on campus is Galanthus nivalis, the snowdrop or common snowdrop. You can see it spread amongst some still dormant ground cover, north east of the east entrance to Mary Lyon Hall, in front of Holmes House, or in the large flower best nestled between the Silver Center and the Eco House. The Galanthus nivalis is the best-known and most widespread of the 20 species in its genus. Snowdrops are among the first bulbs to bloom in spring and can form impressive carpets of white in areas where they are native or have been naturalized. It is known by many titles… including other British traditional common names such as “February fairmaids”, “dingle-dangle”, “Candlemas bells”, “Mary’s tapersand even “snow piercers”. Looking to incorporate the snowdrop into your flowerbeds or naturalize them around your home landscaping? Here are some basics on the this fantastic lil’ bulb:

  • Height: Less than 6 in.
  • Spread: Less than 6 in.
  • Hardiness Zones: 3 4 5 6 7 8
  • Growth Pace: Moderate Grower
  • Light: Full Sun Only;Full Sun to Part Shade;Part Shade Only
  • Moisture: Medium Moisture
  • Maintenance: Low

Snow Drops (Galanthus nivalis)Snow Drops (Galanthus nivalis)

Snow Drops (Galanthus nivalis)

 

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