March 31st, 2013 ~ Easter Sunday

March 31st, 2013 by Sherri

Although there are no Easter Lilies in our greenhouse, the New Guinea Inpatiens are starting to bloom!! This variety is called ‘Divine White’ and absolutely sparkles against the deep green of its foliage. Fertile, moist soil high in organic matter is preferred by New Guinea impatiens, so they are a perfect pick for containers where soil can be amended quite easily. They are more sun-loving than the other impatiens and are accepting of increased sun exposure if their roots are kept moist. Incorporate a slow-release fertilizer into the soil before planting. They should only be planted outside after the danger of frost has passed and the ground has warmed. Space 9 to 15 inches apart. While New Guinea impatiens tolerates sun, it also does fine in shade as well. New Guinea impatiens form compact, succulent subshrubs with branches growing 1 to 2 feet tall by summer’s end. Leaves are long and narrow, green, bronze, or purple. Flowers, growing up to 2 inches in diameter depending on the variety, are white, pink, lavender, purple, orange, and red. They are a great way to make a colorful statement!

New Guinea Impatiens 'Divine White'New Guinea Impatiens 'Divine White'

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