May 7, 2010

May 7th, 2010 by Bridget

In front of the southeast corner of Prospect Hall is a Siebold Viburnum {V. sieboldi} with a very heavy flower set just beginning to open.  This shrub is usually grown in a multi-stem habit but it lends itself very well to be trained as a single stem tree. It has bright green fragrant foliage and clusters of red fruit that turns black.  In the same bed is a Redvein Enkianthus {E.campanulatus} that was raised in the college nursery and has pendulous red bell shaped flowers.  It also has very attractive red fall foliage.  We have some very large Enkianthus in the garden on the north side of Memorial Hall.  Along the south side of High St. below Speare Hall are five ‘Winter Gold’ Crabapples {Malus ‘Winter Gold’} that are covered in white flowers.  This variety gets its name from the large numbers of yellow berries that are effective through fall and early winter.  In front of Mary Lyons Hall is a white flowering Cutleaf Crabapple {Malus toringoides} that has a much finer texture in leaf than other Crabapples because of it’s finely cut foliage.  Just south of the Rounds Hall Clock Tower is a ‘Brioti’ Horsechestnut {Aesculus x carnea ‘Brioti} that has very showy flower spikes of red flowers with yellow throats.

In Plymouth Magazine

Example Image

Ut Prosim: Burton for Certain

Ray Burton ’62 lived all his years in the North Country of New Hampshire. Few elected officials have ever understood the lifestyle and character of their constituents as well as he did or have known so many of them by name. On December 14, 2013, hundreds of Burton’s fellow citizens joined dozens of past and […]

Example Image

Student Spotlight: Mae Williams ’14G A Twenty-first-century Preservationist

When Mae Williams ’14G enrolled in the Master of Arts in Historic Preservation program in the fall of 2012, she was drawn to the strength of a program in which, she says, “The professors are not academics locked away amidst a pile of books, but are actually out in the field on a daily basis, […]