August 2, 2010

August 2nd, 2010 by Bridget

At the east entrance to Smith Hall is a multi-stem Amur Maple {Acer ginnala} whose fruit is turning pink.  The fruit will eventually be silver during the winter months and the leaves will be red and orange before they drop.  At the lower [downhill] entrance to Prospect Hall is a Siebold Viburnum {V. sieboldi} with fruit turning orange and eventually red and then black.  This plant had one of its heaviest blooms in memory and now has a large amount of fruit.  It usually is grown as a multi-stem shrub but lends itself to be trained as a small single-stem tree.


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Faculty Forum: Filiz Otucu on Democracy and the Middle East

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