April 16th 2010

April 16th, 2010 by Bridget

Here is an attempt to bring us up to date on the earliest spring in my time in Plymouth.  At the foot of the Hyde Hall ramp is a ‘Leonard Messel’ Magnolia {M.x loebneri ‘Leonard Messel’} with very showy pink flowers.  The large white Magnolia on the west side of the HUB is a ‘Merrill’ Magnolia {M.x loebneri Merrill’} and is one of the three original Magnolias planted on the south side of Rounds Hall in 1979.  It was moved for the Court Street renovation.  Between the Bagley House and Blair Hall is a white flowered Star Magnolia {M. stellata] that is also one of the original three plants that was moved from Rounds Hall.  The third plant is another ‘Merrill’ Magnolia now growing on the south side of Hyde Hall.  In front of Memorial Hall is a Saucer Magnolia {M. x soulangeana} that has pink and white flowers and they are not quite fully open.  On the west side of Prospect Hall is a group of ‘Cornell Pink’ Korean Rhododendrons {R. mucronulatum ‘Cornell Pink’} that are our first deciduous Rhododendron to bloom each spring.  In the same bed is the evergreen groundcover Lesser Periwinkle {Vinca minor} in bloom with lilac-blue 1″ flowers.  At the northeast corner of the HUB is a large planting of the minor bulb Glory of the Snow {Chionodoxa grandiflora} in bloom with several blue flowers along each stem.  This planting has spread more than any other on campus.  In the same bed are several Mountain Pieris {P. floribunda} a native evergreen shrub with panicles of creamy white flowers.  This plant is a parent of the hybrid ‘Brouer’s Beauty’ Pieris {P. x Brouer’s Beauty’} that is in bloom in front of the north end D&M on Main Street.  Along the walkway south of Hyde Hall is a ‘Robin Hill’ Shadbush in bloom with light pink flowers.  This plant is grown as a single stem tree and also in a multi-stem habit along the north side of the Silver Center.  Above the high retaining wall behind Boyd Hall is a group of Forsythia {F. x intermedia} with their bright yellow flowers.  Our mild winter helped the Forsythia have flowers the full height of the plants rather than just below the snow line as they often do in a more severe winter.  In several locations on campus we have ‘P.J.M.’ Rhododendrons {R. x P.J.M.} in bloom with purple flowers above their small fragrant evergreen foliage.  This hybrid is the most popular Rhododendron in America and was developed at Weston Nurseries in Hopkinton, Ma.  The pictures were taken on the east side of Belknap Hall.

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