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April 27, 2010

April 27th, 2010 by Bridget

At the south end of the garden along the east side of Belknap Hall is our earliest blooming Redbud {Cercis canadensis}.  This native tree has very showy reddish purple buds that open to pink flowers.  In the same bed is a group of ‘Molly Fordham’ Rhododendrons {R. x Molly Fordham’} that have white flowers above small evergreen foliage.  Further north in the same bed is a group of ‘Olga Mezitt’ Rhododendrons {R.x ‘Olga Mezitt’} that have deep pink flowers and small evergreen leaves.  Both of these hybrids as well as the previously mentioned ‘P.J.M.’ Rhododendrons were hybridized at Weston Nursery in Hopkinton, Massachsetts.  On the southeast side of the Russell House is our Flowering Dogwood {Cornus florida} with large white flowers [bracts].  This very desirable tree has a very attractive layered branching structure, bright red fruit as well as great red fall foliage.  At the southeast corner of Prospect Hall we have our first ‘Carol Mackie’ Daphne {D. x burkwoodii ‘Carol Mackie’} blooming with very fragrant pink flowers above its attractive green foliage with cream colored margins.  There is a very large group of these Daphnes along the north side of the HUB Snackbar.   Just to the left of this is a Purpleleaf Sandcherry {Prunus x cistena} that has fragrant pinkish white flowers as well as dark red foliage.  This is the hardiest red leaved flowering shrub available.

April 26, 2010

April 26th, 2010 by Bridget

In front of Highland Hall is our ‘Elizabeth’ Magnolia {M.x acuminata ‘Elizabeth’} with its yellow flowers just beginning to open. This was PSU’s 2009 Arbor Day tree planting and it appears to have come through its first winter in fine form. At the south end of Smith Hall is an ‘Aristocrat’ Bradford Callery Pear {Pyrus calleryana ‘Aristocrat’} in bloom with clusters of white flowers. There is a Bradford Pear blooming at the south end of the upper Boyd Parking lot at Pleasant St as well as along the north side of Memorial Hall. These trees all have glossy green foliage and excellent multi-colored fall foliage that is very long lasting if not cut short by an early hard frost.

April 21st 2010

April 21st, 2010 by Bridget

In Langdon Park the wildflowers are starting a beautiful display.  Trillium {T. erectum} is in bloom in many places along the path by the Baker River with red flowers above its three leafy bracts.  Also called Wake-Robin and Stinking Benjamin because the flowers smell like rotting meat.  In far greater numbers are the large masses of Trout Lily {Erythronium americanum} that are beginning to bloom with yellow flowers held above the mottled green foliage.  Also called Dog Tooth Violet and Yellow Adder’s Tongue. Back on campus, at the northwest corner of Hall Hall is a group of Judd’s Viburnum {V. x juddi} that has clusters of red flower buds that will open to very fragrant white flowers.  Our blooming dates are still well over two weeks ahead of last year.

April 20th 2010

April 20th, 2010 by Bridget

Today we have two groundcovers in bloom.  In front of D&M there is a small planting of Allegheny Spurge {Pachysandra procumbens}, a native deciduous groundcover that has attractive white flowers above bright green foliage.  Under the Korean Mountain Ash {Sorbus alnifolia} at the southwest corner of Speare Hall is a planting of Candytuft {Iberis sempervirens}.  This evergreen groundcover has clusters of showy white flowers and often blooms a second time in very late fall, sometimes the flowers will last into December.  As soon as this flowering is past I will be cutting back the Candytuft to eliminate the legginess.

April 16th 2010

April 16th, 2010 by Bridget

Here is an attempt to bring us up to date on the earliest spring in my time in Plymouth.  At the foot of the Hyde Hall ramp is a ‘Leonard Messel’ Magnolia {M.x loebneri ‘Leonard Messel’} with very showy pink flowers.  The large white Magnolia on the west side of the HUB is a ‘Merrill’ Magnolia {M.x loebneri Merrill’} and is one of the three original Magnolias planted on the south side of Rounds Hall in 1979.  It was moved for the Court Street renovation.  Between the Bagley House and Blair Hall is a white flowered Star Magnolia {M. stellata] that is also one of the original three plants that was moved from Rounds Hall.  The third plant is another ‘Merrill’ Magnolia now growing on the south side of Hyde Hall.  In front of Memorial Hall is a Saucer Magnolia {M. x soulangeana} that has pink and white flowers and they are not quite fully open.  On the west side of Prospect Hall is a group of ‘Cornell Pink’ Korean Rhododendrons {R. mucronulatum ‘Cornell Pink’} that are our first deciduous Rhododendron to bloom each spring.  In the same bed is the evergreen groundcover Lesser Periwinkle {Vinca minor} in bloom with lilac-blue 1″ flowers.  At the northeast corner of the HUB is a large planting of the minor bulb Glory of the Snow {Chionodoxa grandiflora} in bloom with several blue flowers along each stem.  This planting has spread more than any other on campus.  In the same bed are several Mountain Pieris {P. floribunda} a native evergreen shrub with panicles of creamy white flowers.  This plant is a parent of the hybrid ‘Brouer’s Beauty’ Pieris {P. x Brouer’s Beauty’} that is in bloom in front of the north end D&M on Main Street.  Along the walkway south of Hyde Hall is a ‘Robin Hill’ Shadbush in bloom with light pink flowers.  This plant is grown as a single stem tree and also in a multi-stem habit along the north side of the Silver Center.  Above the high retaining wall behind Boyd Hall is a group of Forsythia {F. x intermedia} with their bright yellow flowers.  Our mild winter helped the Forsythia have flowers the full height of the plants rather than just below the snow line as they often do in a more severe winter.  In several locations on campus we have ‘P.J.M.’ Rhododendrons {R. x P.J.M.} in bloom with purple flowers above their small fragrant evergreen foliage.  This hybrid is the most popular Rhododendron in America and was developed at Weston Nurseries in Hopkinton, Ma.  The pictures were taken on the east side of Belknap Hall.

March 23rd 2010

March 23rd, 2010 by Bridget

The Daffodils {Narcissus sp.} have begun to open though they may be slowed by this cooler weather that has arrived.  The picture is taken on High Street in front of Prospect Hall where there are also three Corneliancherry Dogwoods about to open their yellow flowers.  This is our earliest tree to flower each year, the flowers are followed by glossy green leaves and often have excellent deep red fall foliage.

March 8th 2010

March 8th, 2010 by Bridget

Under the ‘Varied Directions’ Larch {Larix decidua ‘Varied Directions’} there are a few flowers of Winter Aconite {Eranthis hyemalis}; a bright yellow cup that will be followed by finely cut foliage.  Both the flowers and foliage are similar and related to our summer blooming   Buttercups {Ranunculus}.  On the south and east sides of Ellen Reed Hall are four Vernal Witchhazels with small strap like flowers in shades of yellow and red.  The flowers open and close depending on temperatures and often last three weeks or more.  Our earliest flowering shrub every year. This is very similar to our Common Witchhazel {Hamamelis virginiana} that is our latest blooming shrub each fall and is a very prolific part of our forest here in Plymouth and throughout the northeast.

March 3rd 2010

March 3rd, 2010 by Bridget

Welcome to our 2010 calendar of blooming plants on the campus of Plymouth State University. We have a very early start this year with our lack of snow cover.  Under the Katsuratree {Cercidiphyllum japonicum} at the entrance to Mary Lyons Hall is a group of Snowdrops {Galanthus nivalis} with small white nodding flowers.  In front of Prospect Hall several groups of Crocus “Yellow Mammoth” as well as Crocus biflorus with flowers in a lighter shade of yellow.

In Plymouth Magazine

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Faculty Forum: Brian Eisenhauer on Shrinking Our Environmental Impact

In his roles as professor, scholar, researcher, mentor, and campus leader, Brian Eisenhauer is at the center of Plymouth State’s sustainability and climate neutrality efforts. Under his leadership, Plymouth State has been consistently recognized as a leader in environmental sustainability and is regularly included in The Princeton Review’s Guide to Green Colleges, a compilation of […]

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Faculty Forum: Filiz Otucu on Democracy and the Middle East

Filiz Otucu is a professor of political science and specializes in international relations, Middle Eastern politics, and the United Nations. A native of Turkey, she earned her MA at the University of Central Oklahoma, and her PhD from the University of Kentucky. Otucu teaches courses on politics and conflict in the Middle East, terrorism and […]

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Teaming Up for Service

There’s more to PSU’s student-athletes than excellent grades and athletic prowess. There’s a desire to make a difference in the world. Plymouth State men’s hockey coach Craig Russell ’09 encourages his team to serve as often as possible. Through the nonprofit organization Team IMPACT, which pairs children with life-threatening or chronic illness with local college […]