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June 6, 2011

June 6th, 2011 by Michael

In front of the Facilities Services building is a Yellowwood {Cladrastis kentuckea} in full bloom with long pendulous panicles of white flowers up to 14″ long. Bright green foliage and smooth gray bark are also attractive features of this excellent tree native to our Smoky Mountains National Park and sporadically elsewhere in the southern and south-central states. We also have blooming Yellowwood trees in front of Prospect and Pemi Hall. Between the HUB and the President’s residence are mature Black Locust {Robinia psuedoacacia } trees that have also have pendulous white flowers, similar to the Yellowwood, though the panicles are not as long, the flowers are very fragrant. Many of the Black Locust on campus has been removed because they were experiencing significant dieback and posed a safety risk because of their height. The pictures included here were taken on Highland Street just a few blocks west of campus. This tree is the hottest burning fuel wood commonly found in New Hampshire. On the south side of Ellen Reed Hall is a ‘Varied Directions’ European Larch {Larix decidua ‘Varied Directions’} and underneath this attractive dwarf deciduous conifer is a beautiful planting of ‘Weihenstephaner Gold’ Sedum {S. floriferum ‘Weihenstephaner Gold’} that is covered in yellow flowers above its succulent green foliage. After a lengthy bloom, the seed can be pruned off and some rebloom will occur. An excellent ground cover that highlights the Larch. Behind the Lamson Library is a ‘Winter King’ Hawthorn {Crataegus viridis ‘Winter King’} that has clusters of white flowers. This tree will have fabulous red fruit that will last, with bright red color, well into winter and is the primary reason we grow it.

June 3, 2011

June 3rd, 2011 by Michael

At the northeast corner of Hyde Hall is a White Fringetree {Chionanthus virginicus} that has white fleecy flowers along with bright green foliage. Rarely there is a dark blue fruit in summer. Along the west side of the HUB are several hybrid Mountain Laurels {Kalmia latifolia} that have colorful buds before opening to flowers in shades of red, pink, and white. The buds are just beginning to show color and as the flowers open I will update the pictures. Along the west side of the parking lot at the north end of the Silver Center, covering a concrete retaining wall is a fabulous planting of Climbing Hydrangea {H. anomala petiolaris} that has lustrous green foliage with large flat clusters of white flowers. When the leaves drop in the fall, attractive cinnamon colored stems are revealed. This vine climbs by clinging to vertical surface and can cover large areas once established.

June 1, 2011

June 1st, 2011 by Michael

At the left of the Bagley House on Merrill St. is a bed of Exbury Azaleas {Rhododendron x ‘Exbury’} with an orange flowered ‘Gibraltar’ on the left and a yellow flowered ‘Percil’ on the right. Very showy flowers from years of hybridizing efforts in England. In front of Mary Lyons Hall are several trees that have groundcover plantings of Bigroot Geranium {G. macrorrhizum} that are blooming with magenta flowers. This plant eliminates almost all weed control around the trunks of these trees and is very attractive throughout the growing season. Along the north side of the Snack bar at the HUB is a group of ‘Nova Zembla’ Rhododendrons {R. catawbiense ‘Nova Zembla’} in bloom with large clusters of deep red flowers above its evergreen foliage. This is one of our most dependable broadleaf evergreen shrubs and is having a very good blooming season. Outside the northeast corner of Speare Annex are a few Highbush Blueberry plants in bloom. This excellent edible ornamental has cream colored bell-shaped flowers yielding delicious fruit mid-summer, as well as excellent summer foliage and first rate red fall foliage.

May 31, 2011

May 31st, 2011 by Michael

In front of the Kelley House [aka Human Resources] is a Dwarf Korean Lilac {Syringa meyeri ‘Palibin’} in bloom with fragrant purple flower spikes covering most of the shrub. This plant is a great choice for a medium sized, very dependable flowering Lilac. Right next to the aforementioned Lilac is a ‘Blue Muffin’ Viburnum {V. dentatum ‘Blue Muffin’} that has clusters of white flower. The flowers will yield blue fruit mid-summer and the foliage will turn bright red in the fall. This is also an excellent moderate sized shrub. Along the east side of Russell House is a very attractive ‘Shasta’ Doublefile Viburnum {V.plicatum tomentosum ‘Shasta’} that was introduced by our National Arboretum. The name comes from the way the flowers sit above the foliage. In front of the Bagley House is a Carolina Allspice {Calycanthus floridus} that has deep reddish brown flowers that appear dried. The flowers have a strong fruity fragrance and the fragrance varies from plant to plant. Across the street from this plant is our European Tricolor Beech {Fagus sylvatica ‘Tricolor’} that has variegated leaves mostly green with pink edges. This is planted in high shade from mature trees to prevent scorching on the pink portions of the leaves.

May 27, 2011

May 27th, 2011 by Michael

In front of the southeast corner of Prospect Hall is a Siebold Viburnum {V. sieboldi} in bloom with large clusters of cream colored flowers. The foliage is the most lustrous of any plant we grow as well as extremely aromatic, often said to be similar to green peepers. Usually grown as a multi-stem shrub, it lends itself to be trained as a small tree, as it is here and at the west entrance of Speare Hall. In front of the Bagley House is a Korean Mountain Ash {Sorbus alnifolia} that has large clusters of white flowers nicely contrasting with the bright green foliage. In the fall there will be coral colored fruit that will last well into winter making a striking display when there is snow on the ground.

May 26, 2011

May 26th, 2011 by Michael

In front of the Kelley House, aka Human Resources, is a ‘Red Bells’ Enkianthus {E. campanulatus ‘Red Bells’} that has pendulous bell shaped flowers tinged in red over cream that hang below the leaves. These plants also have red fall foliage and a very graceful habit throughout the year. This selection has more red in the flowers than the species which is planted in the large garden on the north side of Memorial Hall. On the east side of the HUB is a planting of the broadleaf evergreen Drooping Leucothoe {L. fontanesiana} that has cream colored flowers hanging below its leaves. This shrub does very well as long as it sees very little winter sun, which is why it is planted in this much protected area. In the garden at the north end of the Silver Center by the Roundabout is an Umbrella Magnolia {M.tripetala} with very large cream colored flowers {up tp 10″ across} above its even larger leaves {up to 24″ long”}. This is the hardiest of the three large leaf Magnolia species; it is more of a novelty and not suited to most residential scale gardens. In the same garden are several ‘Rosy Lights’ Azaleas {Rhododendron x ‘Rosy Lights’} in bloom with fragrant deep pink flowers. In front of the Draper & Maynard Building on Main St is a large planting of ‘Brilliant’ Red Chokeberries {Aronia arbutifolia ‘Brilliantissima’} that have clusters of small white flowers with red anthers. This spreading shrub also has bright green summer foliage, truly brilliant red fall foliage as well as very attractive red fruit in clusters. This is an excellent shrub with multiple seasons of interest. In the bed on the left as you drive to the parking in the rear of Boyd Hall are a few Koreanspice Viburnums {V.carlesi} with fully round clusters of very waxy fragrant white flowers. The fragrance rivals Lilacs as among the strongest of shrubs that grow here.

May 25, 2011

May 25th, 2011 by Michael

In front of Boyd Hall is a large group of ‘Cunningham’s White’ Rhododendron {R.catawbiense ‘Cunningham’s White’} that has white flowers above a mounded compact habit. This very well respect variety is coming into its own at Boyd and hopefully will outgrow the Horsetail {Equisetum sp.} that is rampant throughout this bed. In the large garden at the corner of the Silver Center by the Roundabout are several ‘White Lights’ Azaleas {Rhododendron x ‘White Lights’} that have fragrant white flowers. These plants are part of a series of Azalea that were hybridized in Minnesota and are available in several colors. Along the walkway from Holmes House to the east side of Rounds Hall is a ‘Brioti’ Horsechestnut that has very showy 10″ flower spikes of pink flowers with yellow throats. The flowers are very sturdy, often lasting 3 weeks.

May 24, 2011

May 24th, 2011 by Michael

At the rear of the Russell House is our oldest Flowering Dogwood {Cornus florida} with large white bracts. This is one of the best ornamental trees and we are on the fringe of its hardiness zone. Most years the bracts, these look like petals, are injured by the cold. The leaf buds are hardier and are not bothered by our colder temps. Still worth growing, this tree has a very nice layered branch structure, and wonderful red fall foliage and often some red fruit. Along the stone wall on the east side of Belknap Hall is a Carolina Silverbell with small white bell shaped flowers along its branches. This tree also is at the edge of its hardiness zone and after being planted over 30 years ago, it is only recently that it does not die back to the ground. In front of the Frost House is our weeping ‘Louisa’ Crabapple {Malus ‘Louisa’} that has pink flowers that will be followed by yellow fruit. I think this tree has the best weeping form of any of the weeping Crabapples and was named by the late Polly Hill of Martha’s Vineyard. In front of the HUB are several ‘Madonna’ Crabapples {Malus ‘Madonna’} that have fragrant double white flowers that last a little longer than the usual single flowers of Crabapples. These trees have a very dense branching habit. On the south side of Speare Hall are three ‘Adirondack’ Crabapples {Malus ‘Adirondack’} that have a unique vase shape and are covered with white flowers. This tree was introduced by our National Arboretum and is considered completely disease resistant. On the east side of Speare Hall is a large Lantanaphyllum Viburnum {V.x rhytidophylloides} that has cream colored flower clusters above its heavily textured foliage. Clusters of red fruit follow in August that will turn black all too quickly.

May 20, 2011

May 20th, 2011 by Michael

Across campus our collection of Crabapples {Malus sp.} are all approaching full bloom perfectly timed to celebrate Saturday’s commencement. In Arold Field is a group of four ‘Royalty’ Crabapples {Malus ‘Royalty} with deep red flowers above the purple foliage. This is an open pollinated Rosybloom seedling. On High St. above Smith Hall is a ‘Tina’ Crabapple {Malus sargentii ‘Tina’} with red buds that have opened to white flowers. This species is the smallest of Crabapples and is an excellent choice for smaller landscapes. Along Rt. 175 A as well as near the Athletic Center are several Siberian Crabapples {Malus baccata} that are our largest Crabapple and are covered in white flowers. This is one of the hardiest Crabapples and most prolific species with over 150 named varieties. At the top of the stairs leading from Lamson Library to Pemi Hall is a ‘Red Jade’ Crabapple {Malus ‘Red Jade’} that was the first Crabapple with a weepng form. It has white flowers and red fruit. The tree below this is a ‘Winter Gold’ Crabapple {Malus ‘Winter Gold’} that has carmine buds that open to white flowers, this year this is one of the heaviest bloomers on campus. Its lemon yellow fruit is outstanding and is the primary reason we have several of these on campus.

May 17, 2011

May 17th, 2011 by Michael

At the east end of the Athletic Center is an ‘Indian Summer’ Crabapple {Malus ‘Indian Summer’} coming into full bloom with reddish pink flowers that will yield attractive bright red fruit. At the southeast corner of Prospect Hall is our first ‘Carol Mackie’ Daphne {Daphne x burkwoodi ‘Carol mackie’} to bloom with very fragrant pink flowers just above the small green foliage with cream colored margins. We have a large planting of this Daphne along the north side of the HUB that come into bloom a few days later. In the bed next to Prospect Hall’s loading dock is a Purpleleaf Sand Cherry {Prunus x cistena} with small pinkish white flowers above the developing new dark red foliage. The foliage holds its deep red color throughout the growing season though it does have a rather ungainly habit.

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