A Higher Woodpile

October, 2005

11-207On August 25—a week before classes began at Plymouth State this fall—I called an all-campus meetings so that I could talk to faculty and staff about a decision that Carol and I had come to after well over a year of thoughtful consideration. That decision, which I announced to the campus, was that I would retire as president of Plymouth State University at the end of this coming academic year; that is, on June 30, 2006. We will then make our home in Landaff, N.H. Read More

From The Editor

October, 2005

We’ve been making some changes at Plymouth Magazine. The first one you may have noticed is that this Fall 2005 issue is not the Annual Report, and you received it a few weeks earlier than the former Annual Report issue would have been expected. Plymouth Magazine will now be publishing three regular magazine issues each year: Fall, Winter and Spring. The Annual Report is being redesigned as a separate publication that we expect to send near the end of the calendar year. These changes should result in more PSU stories coming your way in our three issues, as well as expanded annual report information covering various aspects of the previous academic year. Read More

To DZ Sisters

October, 2005

Our first Delta Zeta Alumni Reunion has come and gone, but new memories have been created and new friendships have been formed. There were over 50 sisters on campus during Alumni Weekend—thank you to everyone who attended and made our event such a success. For those of you who were unable to attend, we hope to see you at our next reunion in the summer of 2007! Read More

Some More History

October, 2005

Enjoyed reading your excellent publication. In reference to your comment about African students at PSC question from Sam Smith, Plymouth Magazine Spring 2005]—when I was dean of instruction and director of graduate studies (1958-63), there was a Nigerian graduate student whom I counseled. Read More

Mastering the Sciences

October, 2005

PSU offers four new master’s degrees in science

metPlymouth State University Graduate Studies has expanded its offerings with four new master’s degrees in science: an M.A.T. degree in science and M.S. degrees in science education, applied meteorology and environmental science and policy. Approved in June by the University System of New Hampshire Board of Trustees, the first students were able to enroll for the fall semester. Read More

First Class All the Way!

October, 2005

FirstClassThis summer, future first-year students who attended PSU orientation sessions not only toured the campus, met fellow classmates and learned what to expect from roommates, dining hall meal plans and life away from home—they also got a first taste of academics at the University through a faculty-led seminar called “First Class.” Read More

PSU Hosts Conference on Aging for New Hampshire

October, 2005

agingPlymouth State University hosted 125 social workers, mental health and substance abuse professionals, policy makers and local consumers for the New Hampshire Conference on Rural Mental Health, Substance Abuse and Aging in June. The daylong conference was an Independent Aging Agenda event recognized by the 2005 White House Conference on Aging, one of many similar conferences held around the country designed to look at contemporary challenges faced by an aging population. Read More

Spacetacular Saturday!

October, 2005

balloonMeteorology Professor James Koermer, Assistant Professor Lourdes Aviles, Information Technologist Brendon Hoch and senior meteorology major Richard Giard joined the festivities at the Christa McAuliffe Planetarium in Concord, N.H., for “Spacetacular Saturday” on May 7, 2005. Read More

Faculty/Staff Accomplishments

October, 2005

Liz Ahl (English) served on the pedagogy steering committee for the annual Associate Writing Programs Conference, in Vancouver, B.C. She helped edit the annual “Pedagogy Papers,” co-facilitated the pedagogy forums at the conference and presented her own paper on creative writing workshop technique. Read More

The Insoluble Persists,Rondo Ostinato, and God’s World

October, 2005

pubs2Three compositions by Jonathan C. Santore, associate professor of music and chair of the department of music, theatre and dance (MTD), were published in 2005—all have strong connections to PSU. The Insoluble Persists, for trombone and piano, was written for former and current MTD faculty James and Constance Chesebrough. Rondo Ostinato, for brass quintet, was written for MTD alumna Elisa Curren, who went on to complete an M.M. in trumpet performance at Illinois State University. Both were published by Gold Branch Music. God’s World, on a text by Edna St. Vincent Millay, was published by Walton Music. This piece was written for the New Hampshire Master Chorale, which is conducted by PSU Professor Dan Perkins and for which Santore is composer in residence.