From Classroom to Mountain

January, 2006

12-247-head The Adventure Education immersion semester lets these undergrads put classroom theory into action.

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Shared Passion

January, 2006

An American Conductor in Vietnam

by Michele Barney Hutchins

Professor of Music Dan Perkins conducts the Vietnam National Opera and Ballet orchestra in their beautiful new opera house in Hanoi.

Professor of Music Dan Perkins conducts the Vietnam National Opera and Ballet orchestra in their beautiful new opera house in Hanoi.

Music is a universal language that transcends the physical, cultural or historical boundaries that separate the peoples of the world. Through music, people come together and in the process cross those real or perceived boundaries, uniting in understanding, meaning and passion. Read More

Making the Pros

January, 2006

by Linda Levy

(From left)Ichiro Kitano '04 and Jeff Cooper, head athletic trainer for the Philadelphia Phillies with athletic training interns Brian Cammarota and Shawn Fcasni.

(From left)Ichiro Kitano '04 and Jeff Cooper, head athletic trainer for the Philadelphia Phillies with athletic training interns Brian Cammarota and Shawn Fcasni.

Plymouth State has a proud history of producing athletic trainers who work in a variety of settings: colleges and universities, high schools, sports medicine clinics. These four graduates work in professional baseball. Even though they work for different clubs at different levels, their jobs have a lot in common. Read More

The Mystery of the Second Body

January, 2006

A forensic investigation of Jane McCrea’s final resting place

by David R. Starbuck

April 23, 2005—the second "modern" exhumation of Jane McCrea's grave. The exposed coffin, containing the bones, is the new one placed in the grave in 2003.

April 23, 2005—the second "modern" exhumation of Jane McCrea's grave. The exposed coffin, containing the bones, is the new one placed in the grave in 2003.

What is it like to dig up an American icon—in this case the most famous woman to be murdered and scalped during the American Revolution? Over the past three years, I have worked with the remains of Jane McCrea. Her tragic death on July 27, 1777, prompted thousands of outraged Americans throughout the northern colonies to rise up against British authority because Jane had been murdered by Indians who accompanied General John Burgoyne on his march south from Canada. Jane’s death thus contributed to the great American victory later that year at the Battle of Saratoga, known as the “turning point” of the American Revolution. Read More

Tracking the American Horseshoe Crab

January, 2006

by Marcia L. Santore

This American horseshoe crab sports a "pinger" that helps researchers track its activity throughout the year.

This American horseshoe crab sports a "pinger" that helps researchers track its activity throughout the year.

The American horseshoe crab plays important roles in nature, commerce, even medicine. But in recent years their numbers have been declining. Could understanding how they respond to the tides and their own internal “clocks” help reverse that situation? Read More

The Staff of Life

January, 2006

by Kristin Proulx Jarvis

12-249 This fall, Grace Fraser, associate professor of anthropology and sociology, took students on a tour through the world’s nutritional history, from curry and baklava to Thanksgiving turkeys, ceremonial wines and Coca Cola. In a class called Integrated Perspectives on Food Issues, Fraser and her students visited the first tilled rows of early agriculturalists, examined the often unfair politics of food distribution and learned how best to navigate through a modern world of fast food, famines and factory farming. Read More

In the Folk Art Tradition

January, 2006

Jim Lambert ’68

by Donna B. Kelley ’70

12-257 Folk artist Jim Lambert ’68 cuts wood pieces in the mornings, assembles and paints in the afternoons, and leaves evenings to sketch. His materials—and thus his pieces—change with the seasons. He estimates half of his materials are dropped off by neighbors and friends. A box of peach stones and mushrooms left on his doorstep became rooster crops. The nature of the materials dictates the design, but the pieces themselves remain unplanned and spontaneous. Lambert may start with the idea of a sitting cat, for instance, but has no idea what it will look like. Rough hewn, colorful, making use of whatever is around—it is pure traditional folk art sculpture. Read More

From the PSUAA President

January, 2006

12-250As I write this letter, I am reflecting on the changes that have taken place at Plymouth State over the past decade—expanded library, purchase and modification of the D&M building, renovation and expansion of the Boyd Science Center, the beginning of construction of the new residence hall at Langdon Woods, growth of new academic programs (both on campus and regionally), fundraising efforts that exceeded goals, and the move from Plymouth State College to Plymouth State University. All of this and much more is thanks to the leadership of President Donald P. Wharton. In June 2006, President Wharton will be retiring, and on behalf of the PSUAA Board of Directors and the nearly 25,000 alumni, I would like to publicly thank President Wharton for his leadership over the past 12-plus years in making Plymouth State grow to where it is today. Read More

A Moving Tribute: Barry Lavay ’83

January, 2006

12-253Plymouth State alumnus Barry Lavay ’83, professor of kinesiology at California State University, Long Beach, received the Adapted Physical Education Professional Recognition Award from the California Association for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance (CAHPERD) and the State Council of Adapted Physical Education (SCAPE). The annual award recognizes an individual who has made significant contributions in the field of adapted physical education. Lavay was honored for his body of work, including his long-standing excellence in the classroom and extensive publication record. Read More

Class Notes

January, 2006

Compiled by Becky Ciulla ’06, Office of Alumni Relations, Class Notes Intern Read More