PSU Student Ensembles Perform in December

November 25th, 2008 by Adam


PLYMOUTH, N.H. — PSU student ensemble performances make December special.All performances are at the Silver Center for the Arts.

The University Chamber Players will present a free concert at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 3, in the Smith Recital Hall. The program will consist of performances by the Trumpet Ensemble, Flute Choir, Clarinet Choir and Woodwind Quintet, as well as piano ensembles. Tickets are $5, all seats.

A free piano concert follows Dec. 5 at 7 p.m. The students will perform concerto movements by Mozart, Saint-Saëns, Haydn, Rowley, Edwards and Peskanov. Those performing are piano majors and minors Colin McIver, Ashley Rose, Alyssa Costa, Mac Slivka, Julie Formidoni, Allison Jangel, Lauren Parent, Krystal Morin and Marni Balint. Orchestral accompaniments will be performed on a second piano by department Collaborative Pianists Allan DiBiase and Constance Chesebrough, and several piano majors. Professor Carleen Graff, coordinator of piano activities, will perform a movement of a fairly unknown concerto by Pierné.

Dancers take to the stage Dec. 5 and 6 at 7 p.m. as the Contemporary Dance Ensemble performs works by faculty and student choreographers in various styles including tap, jazz, modern and contemporary. Student work was selected through an adjudication process.

The PSU dancers and choreographers premiering their original works in the concert are Noelle Fraser, Lindsay Jarvis, Kristen Kesner and Erin McDonough. The evening includes original musical compositions by Professors Jonathan Santore and Rik Pfenninger as the Dance Division continues to promote collaboration among artists of all genres. Tickets for the dance recital are $10 for adults, $7 for seniors and youth, and free to PSU students with I.D.

The 100 voices of the PSU Chorale and Chamber Singers will present an afternoon of holiday music with the New England Brass Ensemble December 7. The concert begins at 3 p.m. in Hanaway Theatre.

Dan Perkins, PSU Stevens-Bristow professor of music will conduct and PSU alumnus Robert St. Cyr will join the concert as guest organist as the musicians perform a repertoire that includes the inspiring “Welcome All Wonders” by J.A.C. Redford, a composition for choir, brass, organ and percussion. The audience will be invited to join the ensembles to sing several familiar holiday carols.

Another program highlight will be repertoire from The Chamber Singers’ upcoming tour of the Southwest U.S. that includes songs by Johannes Brahms and original settings of Native American texts, composed by Professor Santore.

Tickets for this concert are $12–$8 for adults, $10–$6 for seniors, $8¬–4 for youth and $5 for PSU students with I.D.

Tickets for all programs are available at the Silver Center Box Office, (603) 535-ARTS or (800) 779-3869.

For general information about PSU events, log on to ThisWeek@PSU.

In the News

Example Image

Ice Theatre of New York comes to Plymouth

PLYMOUTH — Douglas Webster is an artistic director for Ice Theatre of New York, which is known as one of the premier ice dancing companies in the country. On Sunday, Webster will be bringing his work to the Granite State- as a bit of a homecoming, as he was born in nearby North Conway. “Bringing Ice Theatre […]

Example Image

Saul O Sidore Lecture Series at PSU presents Thomas Patterson

PLYMOUTH — The Saul O Sidore Lecture Series at Plymouth State University will present Harvard professor Thomas Patterson speaking on “News and Democracy: Why Are Citizens So Misinformed?” at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 21, in the Smith Recital Hall at the Silver Center for the Arts on Main Street in Plymouth. Patterson will discuss the […]

Example Image

Andrew B. Palumbo: NH students should not have to take the SAT or ACT

“SHOULD I TAKE the SAT or the ACT?” It’s a question I’ve been asked countless times throughout my career in college admissions. Unfortunately, it’s the wrong question. College applicants would be better served by asking, “Why should I take the SAT or the ACT?” These students are not at fault for asking the wrong question. […]