Speakers Highlight Aspects of White Mountain Painting Exhibition

February 15th, 2011 by Adam

painting
Edward Hill, Horseback Rider at Echo Lake. Oil on canvas, 1879. Private collection. John Hession photo.

Plymouth, N.H. – Plymouth State University’s Karl Drerup Art Gallery and White Mountains Institute present “As Time Passes Over the Land,” paintings of the White Mountains, February 8–April 9 at the Drerup Gallery. The exhibition is a co-production of the gallery and the Museum of the White Mountains at PSU, which is scheduled to open in 2012. The exhibition includes 29 works by 20 artists.

Gallery events associated with the exhibition include:

Rebecca Noel, White Mountains Tourism in the 1850s: Beauty, Status, and Health

Tuesday, February 22, 4 p.m., Hartman Union 109 [note change of location]

Thanks to railroad extensions, travel to the White Mountains became far easier for tourists from New York and Boston starting in the early 1850s. At first, travelers were drawn by the rugged beauty of the mountains, publicized for two decades by writers and painters. As grand hotels dotted the mountains, however, the pricey version of the White Mountains tour soon became a status symbol for upwardly rising city dwellers. Medical tourism also became a fixture in the Adirondacks and Rockies by the 1870s, but southern New England’s high incidence of tuberculosis lured ill urbanites to New Hampshire’s mountains even earlier.This talk explores 1850’s tourism from these three perspectives.

Film: Pen and Brush, by Andrea Melville.

Wednesday, March 9, 7 p.m., Hyde Hall Room 220

Pen and Brush, a documentary film about the 19th- and 20th-century writers and artists who worked in the White Mountains. Producer Andrea Melville will introduce the film.

This hour-long documentary features White Mountain painters such as Champney, Cole, Gerry and Shapleigh as well as period writers Thoreau, Whittier and Hawthorne who visited and wrote about the area. The program will also feature the little-known female artists and writers of the period.

Richard Hunnewell, Nature into Landscape: Changing Perceptions of the American Wilderness

Tuesday, March 15, 4 p.m., Karl Drerup Art Gallery

Framed by the unfolding panorama of 19th century landscape in the northeastern United States, this talk focuses on defining aspects of landscape painting’s emergence and development, contextualized against the background of the history and culture of the White Mountains.

Gallery events are presented free of charge.

Exhibition information is online at plymouth.edu/gallery/collection/as-time-passes-over-the-land.

Gallery hours are Monday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–4 p.m., Wednesdays 10 a.m.–8 p.m. and by appointment. The gallery is closed during University holidays and vacations, including March 19–27, 2011.

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