Finance Coding String (aka FOAPAL)

Finance Coding String

FOAPAL – This is an acronym that identifies the Banner FINANCE coding string to which financial activity is recorded and report on.

Fund– Identifies the type of financial resources (unrestricted, restricted, designated, gift, etc…) that is being received, spent, or set aside for future and that which is reported on the balance sheet.

  • General Fund– Fund supported primarily by state appropriation and student tuition and fees. Includes academic departments, physical plant and general administration.
    • Educational and General Fund (E&G) – The fund that accounts for the undergraduate educational program, central administration and general university revenues and expenditures.   Fund number “6U0000”.
    • College of Graduate Studies (CoGS) Fund – The fund that accounts for the graduate education program and its related administration and services.   Fund number “6U1000″
    • Student Technology Fee Fund – The fund that accounts for the technology fee paid by students and is used for student related technology services and equipment.  Fund number “6U3000”.
  • Auxiliary Fund – Self-supporting activities for the benefit of students, faculty, staff and the public.  Examples include dining services and ice arena.
  • Contract and Grant Fund – Funds whose use is specified by a donor or agency.  Includes scholarships, research grants, and contracts.
  • Plant Funds – Funds used for capital projects.  Includes building construction and renovation projects and/or capital equipment purchases.
  • Designated and other Restricted Fund – Funds allocated for specific purposes by Trustees, donor, or PSU.  Includes Student Activity Fee, gifts and special scholarships.

Organization (Org) – Identifies the department/entity/group that is receiving or spending the resources.  Examples include the Math Department, Art Gallery, and Center for the Environment.

Account – Classifies the financial activity to ensure proper reporting on financial statements.   The first digit represents the type of account (Asset, Liability, Revenue, Expense, etc…) and the subsequent digits provide the detailed nature of the transaction.  For example, all 7xxxxx accounts represent expense activity but 710100 specifically identify the expense as “Out-of-state Travel”.

Program –  This is always coded as “020” per instruction by the USNH Finance Office

Activity –    Represents a specific activity/event within an Organization.  This is an optional field is used only if the Organizational unit feels it is important to segregate and track the financial activity of a specific activity/event within its Org separate from everything else.

Location –   This field is left blank per instruction by the USNH Finance Office

Account Code Selection Matters:

Effective 10/01/2012, PSU would like to ask all departments to post revenues and expenses to detailed account codes whenever possible. The goal is to provide the PSU Budget and Accounting Office with the most accurate and detailed account information for data analysis purposes.

Use FTVACCT to query for a specific account code.   Account Code Query Guide

 

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