Mindful Eating

There are many stressors for young adults heading off to college: How will I find my classes? Will I like my roommate? How do I prevent the Freshman 15?

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The contents of this Web site and the resources linked to it are intended for educational and informational purposes only. Nothing you read on this Web site is meant to diagnose, substitute for, or otherwise replace actual face-to-face professional counseling.

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What is a psychological emergency?

Some examples of psychological emergencies include suicide attempts or threats, rape, sexual assault, or any other trauma, dangerous, erratic or psychiatric behavior, volatile behavior in proximity to a weapon.

What should you do in a psychological emergency?

If you have concerns about immediate or impending violence towards self or others, contact University Policy at (603) 535-2330 or dial 911.  In case of medical emergencies, obtain medical help immediately by calling 911 or University Police at (603) 535-2330.  If you have questions about how to respond to a psychological emergency, please call us or University Police.  We might intervene immediately in collaboration with other campus resources (e.g., University Police, Health Services, Residential Life), or we might set up an appointment with you to discuss the problem.

When the Counseling Center is not open, please call one of the following if you have a psychological emergency:

  • Genesis Behavioral Health at (603) 524-1100
  • Dial 911, or University Police at (603) 535-2330
  • Speare Hospital Emergency Room at (603) 536-1120 (or go directly there if you have a medical emergency).

How to help someone in a crisis

  • Speak privately to the student or friend, and out of earshot from other people.
  • Remain calm and nonjudgmental with your own thoughts.
  • Be sensitive to the individual but direct in your conversation. It is okay to ask the person if s/he has had thoughts of self-harm ( if you suspect this ). Such a question doesn’t necessarily trigger new ideas of self-harm, but may be a relief for the person to talk about the stress.
  • Acknowledge the importance of what the student is sharing with you. Most likely, there is a lot of pain that the student has kept inside.
  • Refer the student for help. Suggest that you will initiate the phone call to us, or walk with him/her to the Counseling Center (across from Hyde Hall). Make a plan to do either of these that day.
  • Provide encouragement and check up with the person frequently. Caring friends are an important life-line during stressful times. Your concern for the individual is a valuable part of the process toward well-being.
  • Take care of yourself, as well. Helping a friend in crisis is stressful. Tend to your well-being and talk to a trusted individual about your anxieties in this process.

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