If You Are A Victim

If you think your identity has been stolen, here’s what to do:

  • Contact the fraud departments of any one of the three credit reporting agencies:
    • Equifax: 1-800-525-6285; P.O. Box 740241, Atlanta, GA 30374-0241
    • Experian: 1-888-EXPERIAN (397-3742); P.O. Box 9532, Allen, TX 75013
    • TransUnion: 1-800-680-7289; Fraud Victim Assistance Division, P.O. Box 6790, Fullerton, CA 92834-6790
  • Close the accounts that you know or believe have been tampered with or opened fraudulently.
  • File a report with your local police or the police in the community where the identity theft took place. Get a copy of the report or at the very least, the number of the report, to submit to your creditors and others that may require proof of the crime.
  • File a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission. The FTC maintains a database of identity theft cases used by law enforcement agencies for investigations. Filing a complaint also helps us learn more about identity theft and the problems victims are having so that we can better assist you.

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