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Review Timeline

All levels of committee review use the same PSU IRB human subjects research application form. The same criteria for approval are used for each of the three levels of review. The major difference between the three levels of review is the internal process used by the committee to review the application. Applications for human subjects research are accepted on a rolling basis.

Full Board Review

Applications/proposals that require full Committee review may take up to two months to be reviewed depending on when the application is received and the complexity of the proposal.

Important

If your application is received after the next meeting’s agenda has been finalized and the protocols set out for review, (usually done at least one week or more prior to the meeting), your application will not be listed until the following month’s agenda.  This is true for new applications, renewals with or without changes, and any changes made within an approval period.

Exempt/Expedited Review

Federal guidelines allow for some research to be exempt from fill IRB committee review or eligible for expedited review by the committee.  The review should normally take about 2 weeks if all required information and documents are provided and there are no revisions or additional information required.

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