Silas H. Pearl

April 9th, 2010 by Bridget

1871—1873

pearlSilas H. Pearl served as the first principal of Plymouth Normal School when it opened its doors to 80 students in 1871.  He also served as chief recruiter, public ambassador and the senior of only two faculty members.

Born in Albany, Vermont, Pearl married Lydia E. White of Craftsbury and they had two daughters.

“Mr. Pearl earned $2,000 per year and his assistant got whatever was left from the school fund at the end of the year.  The one teacher earned $133.33 for the fall term.” (Bagley, p. 11).

Pearl is buried in Holderness, N.H., and a medallion in the tradition of  his dedication and service to Plymouth State has been created in his name to recognize lifetime service to PSU.  His motto is reputed to have been, “Better to wear out than to rust out.”  His unfailing sense of duty and the rigors of his responsibilities took a physical toll on him and he died in 1873.

from One Hundred Years of Service: Plymouth State College 1871-1971. Norton R. Bagley; and advancement publications

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