Ernerst L. Silver

April 9th, 2010 by Bridget

1911—1946

silverDr. Silver was educated at Pinkerton Academy in Derry, N.H. and at Dartmouth College.  In 1924 he was awarded an honorary Doctor of Pedagogy degree by Dartmouth in honor of his service to education.  He served as superintendent of schools in Rochester and Portsmouth New Hampshire and as principal of Pinkerton Academy before coming to PNS as principal.

Dr. Silver held the second longest tenure of any Plymouth President, serving for 35 years, as principal, director and president of the institution.  PNS became Plymouth Teachers College in 1939 in recognition of its increasing stature.

The Commissioner of Education said of Silver, “He possesses in a large degree those rare gifts of tact and educational ability, well versed in the best ideas of modern education.” (Speare, p.15)

After retirement Silver joined legislature; introduced bills to grant Master’s degrees at PTC. The first graduate program was introduced in 1948.

In 1958 the campus voted to name the then music and physical education facility in his honor.

from One Hundred Years of Service: Plymouth State College 1871-1971. Norton R. Bagley; and advancement publications

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