Sidore Lecture Series presents Mark Howard and David Ruoff on “Ethical and Moral Issues in the Defense of Genocide Cases”

October 24th, 2013 by Lynn

    PLYMOUTH — The Saul O Sidore Lecture Series at Plymouth State University will present former prosecutors Mark Howard and David Ruoff speaking on “Ethical and Moral Issues in the Defense of Genocide Cases: Who Doesn’t Deserve a Lawyer?” at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 5, in the Smith Recital Hall at the Silver Center for the Arts.

    Howard and Ruoff will discuss the principle behind the right to counsel, even when it is known that the defendant is guilty; and the role of attorneys as teachers in geopolitics.

    Mark Howard

    Mark Howard’s career in law spans more than 25 years, during which time he has worked for private law practices and served publicly, first as an attorney general in the New Hampshire Department of Justice where he prosecuted homicide cases, and later as an Assistant United States Attorney for the District of New Hampshire. He has prosecuted hundreds of violent crimes, drug offenses, firearms offenses and white-collar crimes. Howard has been with Howard and Ruoff since he founded the firm in 2009. His practice consists primarily of federal and state criminal defense, complex civil litigation and federal appellate practice at the First Circuit Court of Appeals.

    David Ruoff

    David Ruoff has been practicing law for nearly 20 years, the majority of them dedicated to public service. He launched his career as staff attorney for the New Hampshire Public Defender, and subsequently joined the Rockingham County Attorney’s Office, where he prosecuted numerous high-profile cases. Following a six-year stint with the state attorney general’s office, where he prosecuted homicides, environmental, and public integrity crimes, he entered into private law practice. His practice is focused primarily on state and federal criminal defense, as well as civil litigation.

    The Saul O Sidore Lecture Series was established at PSU in 1979 to bring a variety of speakers to the university each year to address the critical political, social and cultural issues and events of our time. The series is named for humanitarian and New Hampshire businessman Saul O Sidore.

    The theme for this year’s Sidore Lecture Series is “Whatever Happened to Ethics.” The Sidore Series suggests that, “from hunger and the financial crisis in the U.S. and abroad to global warming, there is an ethical component to our failure in dealing with these issues.” Series speakers will discuss the ethical and moral expressions of the problems of today, and potential solutions.

    All Sidore Lectures are free and open to the public, but reservations are recommended. A reception follows each lecture. Tickets are available at the Silver Center Box Office, 535-2787 or (800) 779-3869.

    General information about events at PSU is available at ThisWeek@PSU, http://thisweek.blogs.plymouth.edu.

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