Plymouth U. faculty showcases artwork

February 25th, 2014 by Heather

    Plymouth U. faculty showcases artwork

    LACONIA — Several PSU art instructors discussed their current exhibit, “Faculty Selections: Plymouth State University,” during a reception at the Belknap Mill on Feb. 21.

    The collaboration between the Mill and the University provided an opportunity for the faculty to expand awareness to a new audience as well as giving students a chance to assist in a gallery show.

    Exhibit coordinator Kathi J. Smith, a teacher lecturer in Professional Presentation Practices, said it gave her students, who do matting and framing, an opportunity to help with the set-up of a gallery space as well as to appreciate the work of their instructors.

    “I was approached by [Belknap Mill Executive Director] Denise and Frank Sharlow about bringing our faculty exhibit to Laconia. We do an annual show in the Karl Drerup Gallery in Plymouth in June, and thought this would be a great opportunity to expand to another area,” she said.

    Her own contribution was a realistic sketch, “Dumpster,” which provided a contrast to some of the more abstract pieces in the exhibit which featured works in several media, including oils, acrylics, watercolors, ceramics, printmaking, graphite drawings, and sculpture.

    While diverse, many of the works expressed an appreciation of New Hampshire’s lakes and mountains, reflecting a sense of celebration and experimentation.

    Annette Woodson Mitchell, who coordinates the university’s drawing program, entered a colorful mixed-media work using acrylic paint, Sumi ink, and foam print on Arches Cover, a printmaking paper.

    She said the complex pattern incorporates movement and was inspired by the landscape she so loves, as well as her love of color.

    Philip C. Inwood, an adjunct professor teaching art history, exhibited two panels from a multi-panel series of graphite and pencil on paper which he said were inspired by the mountains.

    The first panel clearly shows the shape of distant mountains, while the intense, almost manic pencil and eraser work on the other panel nearly obscures the mountains while hinting of objects in the foreground that are difficult to make out. “It’s often like that,” he said. “As you get closer, the detail becomes so complex that you lose sight of the more distant hills you saw from a distance.” He added that the work was experimental; he did not set out with something specific in mind but, rather, discovered it as he proceeded.

    That is a sentiment others expressed at the show, as well.

    Rather than planning on a result, art often is a process of discovery.

    Cynthia Cutting Robinson, director of exhibitions, showed a large, mixed-media sculpture, “Flow,” which took the river as its theme. The painted waves and ripples form the background of a threedimensional piece utilizing wood taken from the riverside, with burlap providing a textured bank.

    Jong-Yoon Kim exhibited colorful “Fun With Paper” sculptures that utilize light and shadow to dramatic effect.

    Kimberly Anderson Ritchie offered “Unearth,” a monotype with gauche and copper pigmentan. Elizabeth D’Amico’s “Retirement” is an acrylic monotype with collage.

    Jay Moskowictz exhibited three small oil paint monoprints, “Primary Studies,” that use paint and scraps of newspaper to showcase works in red, yellow, and blue.

    The exhibit is continuing in the Mill’s Riverside Room.

    Featured in Plymouth Magazine

    Example Image

    Student Spotlight: Mae Williams ’14G A Twenty-first-century Preservationist

    When Mae Williams ’14G enrolled in the Master of Arts in Historic Preservation program in the fall of 2012, she was drawn to the strength of a program in which, she says, “The professors are not academics locked away amidst a pile of books, but are actually out in the field on a daily basis, […]

    Example Image

    Ut Prosim: Burton for Certain

    Ray Burton ’62 lived all his years in the North Country of New Hampshire. Few elected officials have ever understood the lifestyle and character of their constituents as well as he did or have known so many of them by name. On December 14, 2013, hundreds of Burton’s fellow citizens joined dozens of past and […]

    Example Image

    Arts: Digital Repository Puts PSU’s History and Culture at Your Fingertips

    Where can you get a close look at a photo of Babe Ruth standing in front of the Draper and Maynard Building, peruse a 1905 copy of Plymouth Normal School’s literary magazine The Prospect, and examine an aerial view of Plymouth State’s campus in 1960? Thanks to PSU’s digital repository, these historical treasures—along with 15,000 […]