Publication Year

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New museum exhibit features hiking trail clubs

March 30th, 2015 by Heather

    PLYMOUTH — In the early 1900s, Americans were discovering the beauty and grandeur of New Hampshire’s White Mountains, and hiking the scenic ridges became increasingly popular.

    Trail clubs began forming, with members creating hiking trails and overnight camping structures, beginning a proud legacy of enjoying and protecting New Hampshire’s most precious natural resource.

    The renowned hiking trails of New Hampshire’s White Mountains and the trail clubs that created and maintain them are featured in the newest exhibit beginning March 31 at Plymouth State University’s Museum of the White Mountains.

    ‘Trail Clubs: Connecting People with the Mountains,’ highlights the history and important role trail clubs have played in the White Mountains region.

    MWM founding director Catherine Amidon said the exhibit enhances visitors’ knowledge and appreciation of trail clubs and the members who comprise them.

    “Look at your White Mountain National Forest map and you’ll find a seamless trail system,” said Amidon. “Those trails were cut and are now maintained by groups like the Appalachian Mountain Club, Cohos Trail Association, Dartmouth Outing Club, Squam Lakes Association and more. This exhibition brings together those clubs and groups that enjoy and help to maintain the White Mountain National Forest.”

    The exhibit includes a full-scale, handcrafted log shelter erected in exhibit space for visitors to view. Other unique images and artifacts of trail clubs and trail making are also on display.

    The exhibit is curated by Steve Smith, author and hiking enthusiast, Mike Dickerman, author and book publisher and Ben Amsden, Director of the PSU’s Center for Rural Partnerships.

    “The exhibit is a great opportunity to see and appreciate the many ways in which trail clubs have contributed to the stewardship of the White Mountains,” said Smith.

    ‘Trail Clubs: Connecting People with the Mountains,’ is on exhibit through March 6, 2016.

     

    Retiring PSU President Sara Jayne Steen delivers final State of University address

    March 27th, 2015 by Heather

      PLYMOUTH — Asserting that “Plymouth State University is vibrant and energetically moving forward,” President Sara Jayne Steen delivered a favorable report in her annual State of the University address on Wednesday. Citing continued success in experiential learning opportunities, an impressive recruitment and marketing effort, the culmination of a major fundraising campaign and campus capital improvements, Steen’s message highlighted the university’s achievements before faculty, staff, alumni and friends.

      Steen announced earlier this year that she will be stepping away from the presidency in June, after leading the university since 2006. She thanked the faculty, staff, students, alumni and friends for all that has been accomplished in her tenure.

      “I am honored to have served you for nine years as president,” Steen said. “I have no doubt about the positive value of public higher education. I have seen what this campus and its people are made of, and I will always love PSU.”

      “I am grateful to the campus for your support and participation,” Steen said at the top of her address. “You contribute your ideas, expertise and talent to keep the university both excellent in quality and financially solid. Because of your work, the state of the university is strong.”

      Steen emphasized PSU’s goal of preparing students for productive, meaningful careers through experiential learning, a principle Plymouth State has embraced with continued success.

      “PSU’s culture of service with engagement is key to the experiential learning environment,” Steen said. “We at PSU are fortunate to have rich, productive partnerships with our host communities of Plymouth and Holderness, and throughout the Lakes Region and North Country and across New Hampshire. They invite partners to engage with us in educating students at the same time that those students serve area schools, non-profits, businesses, and agencies.”

      In the past year, the institution has expanded its recruitment and marketing efforts. Steen noted those efforts have been successful.

      “PSU has received an all-time high number of inquiries and applications for next fall,” Steen said. “PSU is positioning itself for the future.”

      That future, stated Steen, includes the ALLWell North academic and athletic complex, slated to open this fall. The facility will be the largest academic building on campus, providing new space for classes and research, and for programs in health and human performance, community wellness, athletics and recreation.

      The university recently reopened the venerable Samuel Read Hall Building after a $4-million renovation. Hall Building is now home to the departments of counselor education and school psychology and of nursing. The Center for the Environment and Center for Rural Partnerships are also located in the facility. The modernization allows PSU to expand capacity in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math programs, including health disciplines, in Governor Hassan’s proclaimed year of STEM.

      Steen added that the university’s greatest challenges moving forward are reinforcing its financial footing and ongoing student recruitment.

      “We must continue to work on enrollment, on diversifying revenues, on continuing to manage resources prudently and effectively and on reallocating as necessary to pay for strategic investments.”

      This year also marks the conclusion of Steen’s “Imagine a Way” fundraising campaign, which she launched in 2007 with a goal of raising $20 million in support. Her motivation, she said, was her own educational opportunity and success.

      “Like many of you, I am a product of public higher education, as is my husband, and we live a better life than we once could have imagined,” she said. “We hope that for our students. The future does begin with imagination, as we, in my mother’s words, imagine a way.”

      Bringing it back to New Hampshire

      March 27th, 2015 by Heather

        MEREDITH — Inter-Lakes High School students heard from local professionals on Wednesday about their jobs and how they got to where they are today.

        The event, called “Bringing it Back to New Hampshire,” was put on by the Career Partnership Program, which is a collaboration between the Greater Meredith Program and Inter-Lakes High School. It helps students get internships and job shadows with local businesses.

        Speaking to the auditorium full of students were Dwight Cram, a senior systems architect at Electronics for Imaging in Meredith; Gina McGuire, a teacher, nurse and fitness instructor; and Dana Perreault, who spoke about his experience as a probation officer, security officer and bounty hunter.

        It has been an interesting road leading up to his time at EFI, said Cram, saying he started off struggling in college but buckled down, studied, and received a computer science degree. He grew up in a small town in Maine, went to the University of Maine and then moved to Nashua to work for Lockheed Martin. There, he worked on the space shuttle, tanks, flight systems and more.

        “I got to see more cool technology in New Hampshire than I have anywhere else,” Cram said. “That was pretty awesome.”

        He later worked with iridium phones in the Department of Defense, before falling into a job at EFI about 12 years ago. At EFI, they create large format, super-wide printers. He has worked in a variety of facets there, but said every single day he is using his math and science skills.

        Cram said it can be a lot of work and sometimes high stress, but the pay is very rewarding. Cram told the students that computer science is huge field lately, and there will be more jobs in the industry in the future.

        Perreault is a juvenile probation officer for Belknap County. He was raised for most of his life in New Hampshire, graduating from Concord High School. He said he knew right off the bat that he wanted to go into law enforcement, but also knew he needed a degree depending on where he wanted to live. He went to college in West Virginia, where he said he struggled, and then moved back to New Hampshire, where he received a criminal justice degree at Concord Technical Institute.

        “The teachers down there really inspired me,” he said. “They said, ‘Get your associate’s degree in something, get your bachelor’s degree in something else, in case you change your mind.’”

        He said he followed the advice by getting an associate’s degree in criminal justice, followed by a bachelor’s degree in psychology. Perreault worked as Concord Hospital and Concord Technical Institute as a security officer. He also did loss prevention work at Shaw’s Supermarket and then worked as a tracker for the probation office.

        Perreault was also a bounty hunter, which he said was intense because they had the authority to carry guns and knock down doors for people jumping large bails. He was also involved in repossession work.

        “It’s pretty intense when you are going after a criminal that is known to carry a .357 and you are going into a house with just you and your partner,” said Perreault.

        He then had the opportunity to become a probation officer. He said it is a lot of work and that it took multiple degrees and schooling. He has worked in the Laconia area for the past four years and said it is an incredibly rewarding job to have.

        He recommended to the students that they seek jobs in New Hampshire, saying that after traveling around the country, he believes that the people in the Granite State are “more blunt and real.”

        McGuire started off her presentation by having two thirds of the room stand up. He told them that they represented the number of people who will be employed in health care over the next 10 years, saying it is the fastest growing career in the world.

        She began as a registered nurse and is now teaching nursing at the Huot Technical Center. She is also a registered nurse and a fitness instructor at Fitness Edge in Meredith. She said she works in the “best career in the world” because it is about taking care of the human body.

        “Right now, we are in the most amazing thing we will ever own in our lives, and that is the human body,” said McGuire.

        McGuire said she became interested in the health care field when she was young and witnessed her father die of a heart attack while shoveling snow. She wished that she had known what to do for him, and since then she devoted her career to it. She also told the students that the pay is nice, with some registered nurses making more than $30 per hour.

        McGuire said she has been an athlete her entire life and always likes to think about how she can make herself perform better.

        “Becoming a nurse was a no-brainer to me,” said McGuire.

        McGuire also noted that technical colleges in New Hampshire will transfer credits in a 2+2 program to Keene or Plymouth State University for the same tuition. She recommended doing it to avoid leaving school with debt. She also recommended they keep on learning throughout life.

        For more information about the Career Partnership Program, log onto http://interlakes.org/guidance/63-career-partnerships.html.

        Do you have a TIGER in you?

        March 26th, 2015 by Heather

          PSU TIGER auditions for 2015-2016 touring season April 29-May 2

          PLYMOUTH — Theatre Integrating Guidance, Education and Responsibility (TIGER), a Plymouth State University professional touring educational theatre company, will hold auditions at PSU April 29–May 2 for one female and two male performers to join the troupe for the 2015–2016 season.

          This is a part-time paid position, Wednesdays-Fridays, touring from Plymouth throughout New England each week, September through May. TIGER performers need to have strong acting, singing and dancing/movement skills, and a love of children.

          TIGER is an Emmy Award-winning professional educational theatre company that since 2002 has been helping children, schools, parents, and communities deal proactively and positively with social issues and concerns facing children in schools today. TIGER uses the power of the arts to illustrate for children why they need to make positive choices in social situations.

          To schedule an audition, contact TIGER Tour Manager Pam Irish at 535-2647 or by email to pmirish@plymouth.edu. To learn more about the company, logon to Plymouth.edu/tiger.

          Plymouth State takes on nationwide Tobacco-Free Challenge

          March 26th, 2015 by Heather

            PLYMOUTH — Secondhand smoke is responsible for an estimated 49,400 heart and lung cancer deaths each year nationwide. In New Hampshire alone, tobacco use continues to be the leading cause of preventable death with 1,900 lives lost each year, resulting in $729 million spent annually on smoking– related health care costs.

            On Thursday, March 26, from 9 a.m.–1 p.m., Plymouth State University will join campuses nationwide in a one-day challenge to be a tobacco-free campus. Healthy PSU Program Manager Denise Normandin noted 99 percent of all regular tobacco users start by the age of 26, and nearly 14 percent of New Hampshire high school students smoke cigarettes, so the University wants to reach as many students as possible with the tobacco-free message.

            “This is an opportunity for us to engage with students, faculty and staff in a meaningful and interactive way. Some of the activities planned include blending a nutritious smoothie by pedal bike, taking a tobacco-free selfie and entering to win wellness related prizes,” Normandin explains.

            Nationwide, student support for a long-term tobacco-free policy is high. A study conducted in Oregon in 2007 found that two-thirds of college students preferred to attend a smoke-free college campus and three-quarters, including a majority of smokers, would approve of colleges that prohibited smoking on campus.

            Grant funding from the state of New Hampshire Tobacco Prevention and Control Program (TPCP) is assisting in developing policy, identifying enforcement infrastructure and augmenting cessation efforts with the goal of creating tobacco-free environments on all affiliated campuses.

            “One-on-one counseling is the most effective approach to quitting tobacco, but we also do group presentations,” Normandin said.

            “Students and employees understand the harmful effects of secondhand smoke, but quitting tobacco is hard,” said Normandin. “If you know someone who is looking to quit, support them today and throughout the process. Your encouragement could help them kick the habit for good.”

            To date, approximately 1,514 campuses nationwide have a smoke- or tobacco-free policy in place. This is in sharp contrast to 420 campuses in 2010. Colleges and universities across New Hampshire continue their work to prevent college youth from using tobacco products, eliminating exposure to secondhand smoke and helping those already addicted to the nicotine in tobacco products to quit. Some have implemented smoke- or tobacco-free policies; others have approved policies, but have not yet enforced them; and numerous others are continuing or beginning discussions about becoming smoke- or tobacco-free campuses.

            This project is a collaborative effort between the University System of New Hampshire and the Community College System of New Hampshire. USNH serves 30,000 students through four colleges: Granite State College, Keene State College, Plymouth State University and the University of New Hampshire; CCSNH serves more than 11,000 students with seven campus locations.

            A gateway to tobacco cessation services offered to New Hampshire residents is the New Hampshire Tobacco Helpline at 1-800-QUIT-NOW.

            New exhibit at PSU’s Museum of the White Mountains features hiking trail clubs

            March 26th, 2015 by Heather

              PLYMOUTH — In the early 1900s, Americans were discovering the beauty and grandeur of New Hampshire’s White Mountains, and hiking the scenic ridges became increasingly popular. Trail clubs began forming, with members creating hiking trails and overnight camping structures, beginning a proud legacy of enjoying and protecting New Hampshire’s most precious natural resource.

              The renowned hiking trails of New Hampshire’s White Mountains and the trail clubs that created and maintain them are featured in the newest exhibit beginning March 31 at Plymouth State University’s Museum of the White Mountains. “Trail Clubs: Connecting People with the Mountains” highlights the history and important role trail clubs have played in the White Mountains region. MWM founding director Catherine Amidon said the exhibit enhances visitors’ knowledge and appreciation of trail clubs and the members who comprise them.

              “Look at your White Mountain National Forest map and you’ll find a seamless trail system,” said Amidon. “Those trails were cut and are now maintained by groups like the Appalachian Mountain Club, Cohos Trail Association, Dartmouth Outing Club, Squam Lakes Association, and more. This exhibition brings together those clubs and groups that enjoy and help to maintain the White Mountain National Forest.”

              The exhibit includes a full-scale, handcrafted log shelter erected in exhibit space for visitors to view. Following the exhibition, the shelter will be dismantled, transported, and rebuilt by the Cohos Trail Association in northern New Hampshire. Other unique images and artifacts of trail clubs and trail making are also on display. The exhibit is curated by Steve Smith, author and hiking enthusiast, Mike Dickerman, author and book publisher and Ben

              Amsden, Director of the PSU’s Center for Rural Partnerships. Dickerman and Smith co-produced the authoritative reference book, White Mountain Guide: AMC’s Comprehensive Guide to Hiking Trails in the White Mountain National Forest.

              According to Chris Thayer, the AMC’s director of North Country programs and outreach, the White Mountains trail systems are revered by hikers worldwide.

              “New Hampshire has long been a top destination for outstanding outdoor experiences. Our rich hiking history, extensive trail networks, and iconic mountains all contribute to that well-deserved reputation,” Thayer said. “Since the 19th Century, trail clubs have been instrumental in creating the footpaths we all enjoy today and, as shown in the museum’s new exhibit, they remain partners in the ongoing stewardship of these public assets for the benefit of future generations.”

              The trail clubs are also credited with helping create national awareness about the importance of preserving public lands. For decades, timber barons had callously clear-cut thousands of acres of trees, creating environmental disasters like floods and forest fires. The trail clubs appealed to political leaders, claiming forest protection was critical at the national level; soon after, the White Mountain National Forest was created.

              “The exhibit is a great opportunity to see and appreciate the many ways in which trail clubs have contributed to the stewardship of the White Mountains,” said Smith.

              To expand the exhibit’s reach, the MWM has made additional online materials available, including a catalogue, videos and standards-based educational material developed by the Appalachian Trail Conservancy.

              The exhibition was made possible by the generosity of these donors: 2014-15 Museum of the White Mountains members; John Nininger and the Wooden House Co., Ltd, Newbury, Vt.; Ed Rolfe, Wilderness Map Company, Littleton; and Michael Mooney.

              “Trail Clubs: Connecting People with the Mountains,” is on exhibit through March 6, 2016.

              PARENT FORWARD: Don’t just read, do something!

              March 22nd, 2015 by Heather

                If parents want to raise readers in a digital age it is not enough to have books in the house or simply read those books. Parents are going to have to take it one step further. They’re going to have to do something.

                Parent Jason Boog, author of “Born Reading: Bringing Up Bookworms in a Digital Age” (Simon & Schuster), recently released a labor of love for parents. I know, I know, you might be thinking “one more book about raising kids who love to read is one too many,” but in this case, more is good.

                I do caution all parents; it is not going to make bringing up children any easier. Let’s face it: Parenting is one of the, if not the hardest job out there. That goes without question.

                An editorial review from the School Library Journal summarizes “Born Reading,” reiterating that if parents want to “ensure maximum nurturing and brain development” they are going to have to do more than just read. In other words, we are going to have to get up and go further in a real-time, real-life way.

                The chance to do well in school is the chance of a lifetime. I don’t care who you are or where you come from, there isn’t one parent out there who hopes for their child to do poorly in school. In fact, a child struggling to keep up in school is one of a parent’s biggest worries.

                So, lucky for us, Boog combs the brains of childhood-development experts, shares advice from librarians, and gives parents and educators helpful tips from authors and children’s book publishers, while highlighting reading recommendations.

                And you guessed it — parents must start early.

                In fact, the book states in the opening chapter “hospitals should be handing out interactive reading pamphlets along with diapers as new parents head home.”

                Why not? We are talking about the health and welfare of our children. Although I worry that another parenting book is just preaching to the choir, I hope I’m wrong. Instead, I challenge all parents, grandparents, caregivers and teachers who care about our kids to read it.

                The book brings to light how difficult it is to raise a good reader, especially in a digital age. Instead of succumbing to digital overdose, Boog suggests parents take charge and choose those apps that encourage a safe environment for children to create and learn. Hence, I’m looking forward to exploring Toontastic and Lego apps with my grandsons. The ever-faster expanding world of digital media and the integral and inevitable role it has to play in our child’s education should make you want to at least check it out. Otherwise, our kids risk being left in the dust as technology speeds off into the future.

                If there were ever a reason for cracking the books with our kids and providing a decent digital landscape for our children to thrive in, this is it.

                If you follow Boog’s playlist, which is a sensible and worthy one, your child will have a good chance at staying in the game. I don’t have to tell parents that the academic world in which we grew up, one where memorization and spitting out information on a test, no longer applies. We have the information at our fingertips; what is really crucial is how we use that information. Now it is raising a reader who is able to ask questions and think about why the world works the way it does and what that might mean for a kid as a learner living in that same world.

                When you read a book to your child, like “Goodnight Moon” for example, you might ask your child why there might be a lamp in a bedroom, or when the moon shines, or how a rocking chair works. If it is a favorite story, engage your child and invite him to tell you why. How does he feel when he hears the story? You might go outside together to look at the moon. You might talk about how far away the moon is from Earth, or read a moon poem, or find nonfiction stories about the moon.

                If you want to encourage your child’s curiosity you have to engage in a dialogue that will allow your child to have an opinion. After all, don’t you?

                “Any time a child spends on an electronic device should be as interactive as possible,” Boog says. But what exactly does that mean? We know the tried and true stuff like asking lots of questions and opening books together, but we are supposed to go further.

                Go further! Get up and do something about it!

                In other words if your child is interested in Dora then go out and get books that feature Dora and let your child read along with you. Ask your child to share her favorite stories with you in the car or at breakfast. Role play. Have your child take the role of parent or the teacher. Ask her to point out her favorite parts of the story. Let her retell the story to you. Ask her how she feels when Dora is facing a certain challenge.

                Collin, my grandson, loves calling me into his “office” for “conferences,” and this is one way we read together. We also create books together. He draws pictures and he is writing his own text and sharing the stories that he is interested in telling.

                When Robert brings me a book he wants to read we sit down to do it. When he draws a picture inspired by the story I’m not afraid to ask him to tell me more about it. These are some of the ways you can engage your young readers. And parents can’t begin this interplay too early. Start reading as soon as your baby arrives. It’s a tough world out there. If you want to give your kid a technological leg up, read early, read often, and engage your child beyond the book and into his real world.

                Boog promises in one hour a parent can be shown how to get the reading ball rolling. My challenge to you is to tell me that I’m absolutely crazy to love this book.

                Bonnie J. Toomey teaches at Plymouth State University, writes about families in the 21st century. You can follow Parent Forward on Twitter at https://twitter.com/bonniejtoomey. Read more at www.parentforward.blogspot.com.

                American poet Mark Wunderlich is guest reader for April 2 Eagle Pond Authors’ Series

                March 19th, 2015 by Heather

                  PLYMOUTH — Mark Wunderlich, winner of the 2015 University of Northern Texas’ Rilke Prize for his third poetry collection, The Earth Avails, will read at Plymouth State University at 7 p.m. Thursday, April 2, as a guest of the Eagle Pond Authors’ Series.

                  The Rilke Prize recognizes a book that demonstrates exceptional artistry and vision, written by a mid-career poet and published in the preceding year.

                  Publishers Weekly said of The Earth Avails,“Wunderlich became known for warm, urbane poems. Here he switches his stylistic allegiance to plain-spokenness, to the speech of the hills and plains, striking a hard-to-match tone of gentle humility, expanding his poetic powers.”

                  Wunderlich’s first book The Anchorage received the Lambda Literary Award. Mark Doty (a previous Eagle Pond Series reader) called Wunderlich’s second book, Voluntary Servitude, “ … a bold, memorable accomplishment.”

                  Wunderlich grew up in a rural setting near Fountain City, Wisc. He attended Concordia College’s Institute for German Studies, before transferring to the University of Wisconsin to study English and German literature. After moving to New York City, he earned a master of fine arts degree from Columbia University. His credits include the Wallace Stegner Fellowship, the Writers at Work Fellowship, the Amy Lowell Traveling Fellowship, a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship and two fellowships from the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, Mass. He has also received grants from the Massachusetts Cultural Council, the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference in Vermont and the MacDowell Colony in Peterborough.

                  Wunderlich has taught at Stanford University and Barnard College, and in the graduate writing programs at Sarah Lawrence College, San Francisco State University, Ohio University and Columbia University. He is professor of literature at Bennington College and director of Poetry at Bennington, a series of on-campus readings, lectures and short residencies by prominent poets.

                  Before an advanced poetry workshop at The Loft Literary Center, writer Lindsey Giaquinto asked Wunderlich how poets “compress so much emotional complexity into the space of a poem.”

                  Wunderlich responded, “ I don’t really see what I am doing as compression, but rather a kind of linguistic archeology. Every word we use has been used countless times, and the poet’s job is to uncover those uses and meanings and add new life to the language. I’m not compressing so much as revealing.”

                  Free tickets for the Eagle Pond Authors Series are available at the Silver Center Box Office 535-2787 or (800) 779-3869, and are highly recommended. The series is presented with generous support from the Follett Higher Education Group (PSU Bookstore).

                  Now in its 17th year, the Eagle Pond Authors’ Series is a tribute to Donald Hall, one of the nation’s most beloved poets and authors. Hall remains the heart and soul of this series and is instrumental in bringing nationally and internationally revered poets to the PSU campus.

                  Hall will be on hand to introduce Wunderlich, and both will stay after the reading for an author’s reception and book signing.

                  Information about the Eagle Pond Authors’ Series is online at silver.plymouth.edu.

                  General information about events at Plymouth State University is online at ThisWeek@PSU, http://thisweek.blogs.plymouth.edu.

                  Scarborough honored at brief town meeting in Plymouth

                  March 19th, 2015 by Heather

                    PLYMOUTH — Half of last Wednesday’s 50-minute town meeting was dedicated to honoring outgoing six year select board veteran Valerie Scarborough.

                    To a standing ovation, board Member Mike Conklin presented her with a plaque. P.S.U. President Jayne Steen rose and told the crowd, “P.S.U. is expressing their appreciation on behalf of the town and university.”

                    Deb Reynolds asked the crowd for a “sense of the meeting,” and that Scarborough’s name be noted in Plymouth’s history books “in appreciation for everything she’s done.” Put forward as a motion and voted on, her suggestion was passed unanimously by the voting citizens in attendance.

                    Afterward, 81voters quickly accepted all 17 articles with little discussion and no nays heard, Town Clerk Karen Freitas reported the following day. The articles asked voters to add to existing reserve funds, approve cost items in a collective bargaining agreement, make the second payment in a three-year plan to buy three police cruisers, and appropriate $220,000 (with $160,000 from an existing fund account and $60,000 through taxation) for a new ambulance. Voters also assented to a total of $99,556 in appropriation for 16 local community agencies.

                    According to Freitas, “There was not a single nay heard all evening. It was very quiet. We’re so even-keeled now because, I think, of everything being so well laid out. There were no ‘hot-button’ topics this year, and there were no races. We have had excellent revenues and well-laid out budgets for such a long time now.”

                    Last year’s adopted budget was $8,153,419; this year, it’s $8,009,209, down by $144,210.

                    The 50 minutes was the shortest meeting Freitas can recall; the longest going to one in the morning “quite a long time ago; mostly, they stay around two hours.”

                    With the shorter meetings, though, voter attendance has also dropped in the past few years: 125 in 2012, 89 in ‘13, 83 in ‘14 and 81 in ‘15.

                    Clark changing jobs at Plymouth State

                    March 19th, 2015 by Heather

                      PLYMOUTH — Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Julie Bernier has announced that changes are coming to the Plymouth State University Athletics Department, beginning in the summer of 2015.

                      Bernier said that PSU Director of Athletics John P. Clark will officially step down from his current position this summer and move into a role as founding manager of the Active Living, Learning and Wellness (ALLWell) North facility. Clark has been an administrator at his alma mater for more than four decades, including two stints as Athletic Director that cover nearly 20 years.

                      “I am excited to be changing jobs,” said Clark. “I will be stepping down as director of athletics at the end of the school year and will continue to work at Plymouth State in this part-time position. It means a lot to me to be able to see this incredible new facility open and be fully operational. I will then retire from Plymouth State in 2016.”

                      Bernier also announced that Associate Athletic Director and Senior Woman Administrator Kim Bownes will serve as Interim Director of Athletics for the 2015-16 school year. Bownes has been on the PSU Athletics staff for nearly 30 years, including 21 years as varsity men’s and women’s alpine ski coach and the past seven years in her current administrative position.

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