1 2 3 401

Drop-in curling offered in October

October 1st, 2014 by Heather

    PLYMOUTH — The days are getting shorter, the nights are growing colder, winter is coming, which means get all the curling in while there’s still time. The Plymouth State University Ice Arena will be offering drop-in curling on Monday nights from 8:30 to 10:30 p.m. through Oct. 13, on Oct. 20 from 9 to 11 p.m., and on Saturday, Oct. 4, from 2 to 4 p.m. New players are always welcome, instructors basics and enjoy the game to its fullest. The cost is $10 per person. For more information, contact psu-icearena@ plymouth.edu or call 535-2SK8 (2758).

    Experts discuss eating disorders with professionals

    September 27th, 2014 by Heather

      MEREDITH — In its sixth year, Plymouth State University’s Eating Disorder Institute held the Eating Disorders Conference, where experts on eating disorders from all around the country made presentations focusing on clinical issues, education and advocacy, and diversity and integrative therapies.

      The conference, which took place at Church Landing on Thursday and Friday, was titled “Untangling the Web of Disordered Eating and Weight Disorders: Educate, Engage, Empower.” It provided information focusing on eating and weight disorders, and covered emerging issues.

      The event was organized by Mardie Burckes-Miller, who is a professor of Health Education and the director of the Eating Disorders Institute at PSU. Burckes-Miller explained that the event began in 2003 and is grant funded, with PSU as one of the event’s sponsors. She also said that the Hilda and Preston Davis Foundation assisted with funding.

      Burckes-Miller explained that she has been in the field for more than 30 years and started the Eating Disorder Institute Graduate Program 12 years ago. She said it is the only one in the country included by the International Association of Eating Disorders. This year, she said, there were a number of eating disorder treatment centers that are sponsors, and there were 25 of the “leading eating disorder experts in the country.”

      Burckes-Miller said that they had a clinical track for medical providers, dieticians and therapists. There was a diversity integrative track that involves medicine, yoga and other therapies. Educational advocacy focused on school prevention, insurance, medical aspects of when to call 911 for people who may not be medical providers and can know how to spot disorders, and identifying eating disorders in older women- which Burckes-Miller said often goes unrecognized.

      “Most people walk into a primary care physician or medical practice, and 50 percent of people go unrecognized for eating disorders,” she said. “Many professionals don’t have the training.”

      Burckes-Miller explained that there is only one outpatient treatment facility for eating disorders in the state, located in Bedford, and she said that she has a grant she is doing for the Hilda Preston Foundation for areas north of Plymouth. She said that there are hardly any providers at all in the northern regions of the state, which is why she started the Eating Disorder Institute.

      There are 30 graduate students in the current program from all over the world, she said. Some live in the United States and others have flown in for the graduate program. The grant will cater to the North Country, she said, with groups in Plymouth, Conway, Berlin, Littleton and Colebrook. She said she is trying to have a medical provider, therapist and a dietician who would be trained and would be able to work as a team.

      The conference involved a variety of professionals in the field who gave their insight and expertise on aspects of eating disorder treatment. Attending the conference were mental health counselors, psychologists, dieticians, nurses, school professionals and more.

      It began at 8 a.m. on Thursday with Margaret Nagib speaking about intoxicating cycles of shame, focusing on the missing link in the treatment of co-occurring eating and substance abuse disorders. Douglas Bunnell spoke about the treatment of eating disorders and David Anderson gave a presentation on the integrative medical approach to eating disorders. Kathleen MacDonald then spoke about insurance and eating disorders.

      Later in the morning Karl Anderson and Marcia Hudnall gave presentations on binge eating disorders and the key to effective treatment. Norman Kim spoke about the changing face of eating disorders and Edward Tyson discussed when to call 911 and detecting serious medical issues.

      Katherine Godwin gave a presentation in the afternoon about medical and psychiatric conditions in treatment, while Ted Weltzin discussed eating disorders with males. Marcia Herrin then focused her discussion on insurance coverage.

      Emmett Bishop spoke about acceptance commitment therapy, and Beth McGilley and Margo Maine discussed bridging gaps in eating disorders. Jennifer Burnell discussed eating disorders and trauma.

      On Friday the event was trimmed down a bit, beginning with speaker Dr. James Greenblatt who discussed food addiction, the biology of the appetite and binge eating disorders. Marcia Herrin, Hilary Coons, Edward Tyson and Bob Bordonaro were involved in a rural health panel and Marcia Larken discussed GI issues and eating disorders. Stephanie Haines and Hilly Pirtle focused on school strategies and prevention.

      Marlene Maheu discussed the legal aspects involving eating disorders, notably best practices in telemental health, as well as evidence-based reimbursable models. Kathryn Ackerman focused her discussion on athletes and eating disorders, while Marci Anderson and Sarah Kelly discussed pushing boundaries and the scope of practice. Laura Douglass had a presentation discussing the somatic sense of connection in recovery and Lisa Stockwell talked about motivational interviewing.

      The Eating Disorders Institute Graduate Certificate Program is a 15-credit program for graduate credit for professionals in New Hampshire, as well as host partner Mirasol Recovery Centers in Arizona. The courses provide professionals with research-based tools, techniques and strategies for medical treatment, mental health counseling, education and outreach and nutritional counseling.

      For additional information, log ontohttp://www.plymouth.edu/graduate/academics/degrees/masters/med/health-education/eating-disorders-institute/.

      Exchange program draws Chinese students to Pinkerton

      September 26th, 2014 by Lynn

        By HUNTER McGEE
        Union Leader Correspondent

        DERRY — Fourteen Chinese students traveled to Pinkerton Academy this week to participate in an exchange program that strives to bring the two cultures together through shared experiences.

        The students are from Pinkerton’s sister high school, Tanggu No. 1 School in the town of Tianjin, just southwest of Beijing. Arriving Saturday night, they were warmly greeted by their host families after a marathon flight from their homeland.

        A group of Pinkerton students, who traveled to Tianjin in April, are hosting the students. Every fall, the Chinese students come to visit with Pinkerton students for one week and then travel for an additional week to other sites in the country; and every spring, Pinkerton students travel to China for two weeks, said Pinkerton social studies teacher Joey Lee.

        “By running this program we want our Pinkerton students to recognize that they are not just students of the United States, but citizens of the world,” Lee said. “And when we have our sister school of Tanggu come here, we want them to feel at home and give them the sense of what life is like in New Hampshire; and have them recognize them through various walks of life, that they too are citizens of the world like us.”

        Students traveled to Plymouth State University to experience an American college campus and made a stop at Timberland, where they learned about advertising, marketing and design, said Lee, who accompanied the students.

        There was also time for some fun as the students took part in an ice cream social and Wiffle ball game during the week. Both events were hosted by the student council.

        “The Wiffle ball game is very much a part of Americana, which is what we want the students to experience,” Lee said.

        For Chinese student Kong Xiang Rui, 16, hitting a Wiffle ball was challenging at first, but he was eventually able to make contact. It was a matter of coordinating his swing with the speed of the fluttering ball.

        “It is really difficult,” Yui said. “It is hard to beat the ball with a stick. It is so far away; it is hard.”

        The trip was Rui’s first to the United States. In China, Rui said he mainly learned about America from reading books and watching various television shows. From these experiences, he thought the country’s landscape resembled New York, with its famous skyline and fast pace.

        But his impressions of America changed after arriving in Derry.

        “When I came here I found that it is not all the same, ‘‘ he said. “Just like China, we have some big cities, but we also have countryside,” he said. “So, I know there are some very peaceful places in America.”

        Rui and the other students are scheduled to leave Derry on Saturday morning, eventually returning home with a better understanding of America and its citizens of the world.

        PSU English Professor Liz Ahl awarded Writers’ Colony Fellowship

        September 25th, 2014 by Lynn

          Holderness resident will write about community

          PLYMOUTH — Plymouth State University English Liz Ahl is the recipient of the Moondancer Fellowship at the Writers’ Colony at Dairy Hollow in Eureka Springs, Ark. The yearly fellowship is awarded to a writer whose work deals with the environment or nature. While at the Colony during her two week stay, Ahl will be working on a collection of poems called “Holderness,” named for the town where she lives.

          “My intention with these poems is to evoke a strong sense of place that’s rooted in the overlapping and symbiotic ecosystems of human history and ecology/ biology, or between human time and geologic time,” said Ahl. “Many ‘natural’ features of Holderness – Squam Lake, Rattlesnake Mountain, the Pemigewassett River, and so on – intersect with human activity to create this place where we live. Ice harvests, town meetings, mud season, and other seasonal events co-create, with natural phenomena, the ebb and flow of the years.”

          Ahl is the author of three chapbooks, which are typically collections, usually of poetry, of twenty to forty pages. Her first chapbook, “A Thirst That’s Partly Mine,” won the 2008 Slapering Hol Press chapbook contest. A third chapbook, “Talking About the Weather,” was published in a limited edition in 2012 by Seven Kitchens Press.

          Ahl calls her first chapbook of poems, “A Thirst That’s Partly Mine,” “my first concentrated effort to focus on the natural world as a writer.” The collection, in the words of the publisher, “explores the ways humans perceive and interact with a natural world that can seem both intimately connected to our concerns and yet profoundly unknowable.” Poet Robin Becker describes Ahl as bringing “a naturalist’s close observation” to poems “about our lived experiences in the natural/ physical world.”

          Ahl’s “Talking About The Weather” continued her interest in writing about the natural world, with poems about mud season, plagues of acorns, and splitting wood. Individual poems by Ahl have appeared in numerous literary journals and anthologies. She has worked at Plymouth State since 2002.

          Degree program offers savings to Manchester teachers

          September 25th, 2014 by Lynn

            By TED SIEFER New Hampshire Union Leader

            MANCHESTER — A coalition of colleges and universities is set to offer city school teachers a master’s degree program at a cost of $10,000.

            The program was unveiled at a ceremony Tuesday at Manchester High School West, the site of the district’s new STEAM Ahead Academy. STEAM Ahead will enable students to earn college credit in science and arts-related courses, and a central goal of the master’s program is to prepare teachers to offer such instruction.

            The new teaching degree is a “high quality and affordable program aimed at very specific teacher education needs, while providing broadly applicable skills and knowledge,” University System of New Hampshire Chancellor Todd Leach said in a statement.

            Granite State College and Plymouth State University are partnering with UNH-Manchester on the masters in education degree. Much of the instruction during the 28-month program would take place online, while classroom instruction would occur at West High.

            The kick-off ceremony was attended by Manchester Mayor Ted Gatsas, Superintendent Debra Livingston and former mayor Robert Baines, who is heading up the STEAM Ahead program.

            Gatsas praised the universities for stepping up. “By forming this partnership with these higher education institutions and offering this program at an affordable cost, both the students and teachers are sure to benefit,” Gatsas said.

            Livingston said the program will provide a “much needed pipeline as we continue to hire the best and brightest to lead our schools and district office.”

            The cost of a masters in education degree program at UNH-Manchester typically runs around $25,000. Under contract, teachers in the Manchester district who have masters degrees get $4,000 more than those with bachelors degrees.

            Teachers who participate in the $10,000 masters program would not be obligated to stay in Manchester district schools once they complete their degrees.

            So far, six teachers have expressed an interest in the program, according to a university system spokeswoman.

            tsiefer@unionleader.com

            PSU receives high ranking for employability of alumni

            September 25th, 2014 by Heather

              ETC college rankings based on tuition, job placement and average salary

              PLYMOUTH — Plymouth State University alumni rank in the top 15 percent in a recent national review of more than 1,200 institutions that was conducted by a national non-profit agency, Educate to Career (ETC).

              PSU alumni are better positioned to work in their chosen field and receive better-than-average salaries compared to graduates from competing institutions, according to ETC, which offers data-driven, outcome-focused tools that enable high school students and their parents to make informed, objective university and career planning decisions. Dr. Jim Hundrieser, PSU’s Vice President for Enrollment and Student Affairs, said the ranking illustrates Plymouth State’s value to potential students.

              “As an innovative residential campus, Plymouth State University is continuing to seek ways to engage students to ensure that they are career ready upon graduation,” Hundrieser said. “Employers who hire our alumni tell us PSU graduates are ready to work and make significant contributions within their fields, and the latest alumni survey tells us 99 percent of our recent graduates are either employed or enrolled in graduate school.”

              ETC uses various metrics to determine an institution’s value in preparing graduates for the workforce, including:

              · Percentage of graduates employed in occupations that utilize their field of study,

              · Average salary earned by recent graduates, by school for each major category (adjusted for region, occupation and other variables),

              · Percentage of persons employed within one year of graduation (weighted on an occupational trend basis),

              · Major, weighted against national norms,

              · Number of years to graduate, and

              · Tuition- net cost.

              The ETC College Rankings Index is comprised of four-year colleges and universities, with annual enrollments greater than 1,000 students. The Index analyzes data for over 1,200 colleges, representing 94 percent of all students enrolled in four-year institutions.

              A neutral 501(c)(3) nonprofit, Educate To Career is the leader in providing data, tools and programs in the area of educational attainment to career outcomes.

              PSU English Professor Liz Ahl awarded Writers’ Colony Fellowship

              September 25th, 2014 by Heather

                Holderness resident will write about community

                PLYMOUTH — Plymouth State University English Liz Ahl is the recipient of the Moon- dancer Fellowship at the Writers’ Colony at Dairy Hollow in Eureka Springs, Ark. The yearly fellowship is awarded to a writer whose work deals with the environment or nature. While at the Colony during her two week stay, Ahl will be working on a collection of poems called “Holderness,” named for the town where she lives.

                “My intention with these poems is to evoke a strong sense of place that’s rooted in the overlapping and symbiotic ecosystems of human history and ecology/biology, or between human time and geologic time,” said Ahl. “Many ‘natural’ features of Holderness – Squam Lake, Rattlesnake Mountain, the Pemigewassett River, and so on – intersect with human activity to create this place where we live. Ice harvests, town meetings, mud sea- son, and other seasonal events co-create, with natural phenomena, the ebb and flow of the years.”

                Ahl is the author of three chapbooks, which are typically collections, usually of poetry, of twenty to forty pages. Her first chapbook, “A Thirst That’s Partly Mine,” won the 2008 Slapering Hol Press chapbook contest. A third chapbook, “Talking About the Weather,” was published in a limited edition in 2012 by Seven Kitchens Press.

                Ahl calls her first chapbook of poems, “A Thirst That’s Partly Mine,” “my first concentrated effort to focus on the natural world as a writer.” The collection, in the words of the publisher, “explores the ways humans perceive and interact with a natural world that can seem both intimately connected to our concerns and yet profoundly unknowable.” Poet Robin Becker describes Ahl as bringing “a naturalist’s close observation” to poems “about our lived experiences in the natural/physical world.”

                Ahl’s “Talking About The Weather” continued her interest in writing about the natural world, with poems about mud season, plagues of acorns, and splitting wood. Individual poems by Ahl have appeared in numerous literary journals and anthologies. She has worked at Plymouth State since 2002.

                Celebrating 30 years of PSU Theatre

                September 25th, 2014 by Heather

                  Memorabilia on display Sept. 16-Oct. 31 at the Silver Center

                  PLYMOUTH — Selections from 30 years of theatre memorabilia from the Department of Music, Theatre, and Dance and the archives at Plymouth State University will be displayed at the Silver Center for the Arts in an exhibition curated by PSU Professor Matthew Kizer, the resident scenic and lighting designer.

                  Kizer says he developed the retrospective exhibition at the request of the Director of the Karl Drerup Art Gallery and Exhibitions program, Cynthia Robinson.

                  “I’m the visual guy in the department,” Kizer says, “so this task quickly became mine.”

                  Kizer has designed an illustrated timeline for the rotunda wall in the Silver Center and will employ multiple video screens along with the physical memorabilia such as photographs, posters and playbills. He contacted former directors and designers for archival material, and sorted through department files and the Spinelli Archives at the PSU Lamson Library and Learning Commons, selecting materials representative of the evolution of the academic theatre program over the three decades since its formal inception.

                  Theatre has a long history at Plymouth State going back to the late 1800s, but the academic major was established in 1984 under the initiative of Professor Charles Combs. Professor Roi White in the English Department had previously directed productions with The Plymouth Players student group.

                  Combs says theatre is part of the liberal arts tradition—an art form, and Plymouth State needed to develop a program.

                  “I went to Jim Hobart (chief financial officer) and told him that in addition to repairs to the stage and curtains, we needed a theatre minor. Hobart asked, ‘Why not a major?’ and not long after that the major was created,” he recalled.

                  Combs developed the curriculum, got it approved and moved from the English department to the newly expanded Department of Music and Theatre.

                  He says, “I wanted to be an educator, not a director. Students got it all—education and the art.”

                  He was a one-man department at the time, but had experience in design and technology, as well as performance, theatre literature, history and criticism, and was able to bring in guest directors, choreographers and designers to round out the students’ experience.

                  With the help of Dean William Chmurny, a room full of decaying flats of scenery was rebuilt by theatre designer Dick Jeter as a black box experimental theatre, the first space dedicated solely to theatre in Silver Hall [since 1992, The Silver Center for the Arts].

                  Then student, now theatre technician, Bob Bruemmer remembers hat the main stage was originally in a “gymnatorium,” a multipurpose gymnasium and auditorium shared with the music program and other campus events.

                  “It was a gym with a dividing wall at center, with a stage at one end and pull-out bleacher seats at the other. We would close the wall for smaller shows and open it for larger ones. It wasn’t uncommon to abandon the stage and build the set in front of the proscenium or occasionally do a show in the round,” Bruemmer says. “The black box was in the old Silver and we did a schedule of one main stage and one studio show a semester.”

                  Plymouth State College alumni remember productions on a small stage in Samuel Read Hall residence hall and in Silver Hall. Today, main stage productions take place in the 665-seat Hanaway Theatre, while smaller-scale productions are staged in the intimate 110-seat “black box” studio theatre, both at the Silver Center. These two very different venues provide for a great breadth of experience for performers and audiences alike.

                  Alison Ford, art director at The SLAPI NBC Universal Studios in New York, was associate professor of theatre at Plymouth State from 1988 to 1995.

                  Ford says, “The students and I were evenly matched when I was teaching at Plymouth State. Plymouth was my first teaching job, and many of the students I taught were the first generation in their families to go to college. For both of us, this was a leap of faith. My students and I were breathless with the task of shaping the theatre world and our- selves. We built doll garments in Costume Construction, earned Introdollars in Introduction to Theatre (a Monopoly-money premium redeemable on weekly quizzes), and designed for the shallow stages of Broadway houses in Set Design. During my time at Plymouth the Silver Cultural Arts Center was built on the footprint of Silver Hall. For the faculty, staff, students and community, that was another leap of faith. I think it’s safe now to pronounce that effort a good gamble.”

                  The Silver Center, on Main Street in Plymouth, hosts professional artists, lecturers, poets and productions of the Department of Music, Theatre, and Dance and the Educational Theatre Collaborative at PSU.

                  Matt Kizer is a regular designer for Jean’s Playhouse regional company in Lincoln. He has also designed for the Educational Theatre Collaborative, the Kearsarge Arts Theatre, Auburn University in Alabama, Operafestival Di Roma in Italy, the Barnstormers Theatre, White River Theatre Festival in Vermont and for dance companies, theatres and colleges in New England, Virginia, Ohio and Indiana. He holds a B.A. in theatre and a M.F.A in design.

                  The Silver Center is open Monday-Thursday, 8 a.m.–10 p.m., Friday 8 a.m.–5 p.m., Saturday and Sunday, noon–6 p.m. and during performances. The Silver Center is closed on PSU holidays.

                  Information about the Silver Center is online at silver.plymouth.edu.

                  General information about events at Plymouth State University is online at ThisWeek@ PSU, http://thisweek. blogs.plymouth.edu.

                  PSU receives high ranking for employability of alumni

                  September 25th, 2014 by Lynn

                    PLYMOUTH — Plymouth State University alumni rank in the top 15 percent in a recent national review of more than 1,200 institutions that was conducted by a national non-profit agency, Educate to Career (ETC).

                    PSU alumni are better positioned to work in their chosen field and receive better-than-average salaries compared to graduates from competing institutions, according to ETC, which offers data-driven, outcome-focused tools that enable high school students and their parents to make informed, objective university and career planning decisions. Dr. Jim Hundrieser, PSU’s Vice President for Enrollment and Student Affairs, said the ranking illustrates Plymouth State’s value to potential students.

                    “As an innovative residential campus, Plymouth State University is continuing to seek ways to engage students to ensure that they are career ready upon graduation,” Hundrieser said. “Employers who hire our alumni tell us PSU graduates are ready to work and make significant contributions within their fields, and the latest alumni survey tells us 99 percent of our recent graduates are either employed or enrolled in graduate school.”

                    ETC uses various metrics to determine an institution’s value in preparing graduates for the workforce, including:

                    · Percentage of graduates employed in occupations that utilize their field of study,

                    · Average salary earned by recent graduates, by school for each major category (adjusted for region, occupation and other    variables),

                    · Percentage of persons employed within one year of graduation (weighted on an occupational trend basis),

                    · Major, weighted against national norms,

                    · Number of years to graduate, and

                    · Tuition- net cost.

                    The ETC College Rankings Index is comprised of four-year colleges and universities, with annual enrollments greater than 1,000 students. The Index analyzes data for over 1,200 colleges, representing 94 percent of all students enrolled in four-year institutions.

                    A neutral 501(c)(3) nonprofit, Educate To Career is the leader in providing data, tools and programs in the area of educational attainment to career outcomes.

                     

                    PSU receives high ranking for alumni employment

                    September 23rd, 2014 by Lynn

                      PLYMOUTH — Plymouth State University alumni rank in the top 15 percent in a recent national review of more than 1,200 institutions that was conducted by a national non-profit agency, Educate to Career.

                      PSU alumni are better positioned to work in their chosen field and receive better-than-average salaries compared to graduates from competing institutions, according to ETC, which offers data-driven, outcome-focused tools that enable high school students and their parents to make informed, objective university and career planning decisions.

                      Dr. Jim Hundrieser, PSU’s vice president for enrollment and student affairs, said the ranking illustrates Plymouth State’s value to potential students.

                      “As an innovative residential campus, Plymouth State University is continuing to seek ways to engage students to ensure that they are career ready upon graduation,” Hundrieser said.

                      “Employers who hire our alumni tell us PSU graduates are ready to work and make significant contributions within their fields, and the latest alumni survey tells us 99 percent of our recent graduates are either employed or enrolled in graduate school.”

                      ETC uses various metrics to determine an institution’s value in preparing graduates for the workforce, including:

                      · Percentage of graduates employed in occupations that utilize their field of study,

                      · Average salary earned by recent graduates, by school for each major category (adjusted for region, occupation and other variables),

                      · Percentage of persons employed within one year of graduation (weighted on an occupational trend basis),

                      · Major, weighted against national norms,

                      · Number of years to graduate, and

                      · Tuition- net cost.

                      The ETC College Rankings Index is comprised of four-year colleges and universities, with annual enrollments greater than 1,000 students.

                      The Index analyzes data for over 1,200 colleges, representing 94 percent of all students enrolled in four-year institutions.

                      A neutral 501(c)(3) nonprofit, Educate To Career is the leader in providing data, tools and programs in the area of educational attainment to career outcomes.

                       

                      Featured in Plymouth Magazine

                      Example Image

                      PSU Collaboration Leads to Emmy

                      When Trish Lindberg was a 17-year-old musician, artist, and actor, her mother—a teacher herself—told her she would make a great teacher. Lindberg looked her mother right in the eye and said, “I will never be a teacher!” Mother Knows Best Decades later, Lindberg, now a Carnegie Foundation NH Professor of the Year, a recipient of […]

                      Example Image

                      Teaming Up for Service

                      There’s more to PSU’s student-athletes than excellent grades and athletic prowess. There’s a desire to make a difference in the world. Plymouth State men’s hockey coach Craig Russell ’09 encourages his team to serve as often as possible. Through the nonprofit organization Team IMPACT, which pairs children with life-threatening or chronic illness with local college […]

                      Example Image

                      Faculty Forum: Filiz Otucu on Democracy and the Middle East

                      Filiz Otucu is a professor of political science and specializes in international relations, Middle Eastern politics, and the United Nations. A native of Turkey, she earned her MA at the University of Central Oklahoma, and her PhD from the University of Kentucky. Otucu teaches courses on politics and conflict in the Middle East, terrorism and […]