Media Outlet

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Marietta woman chosen as 2015 ACE Fellow

May 8th, 2015 by Heather

    Plymouth State University History Professor Marcia Schmidt Blaine, daughter of Suzanne Schmidt of Marietta and the late Frederick K. Schmidt, has been named an American Council on Education Fellow for the 2015-16 academic year.

    Blaine is one of 47 individuals selected for the prestigious leadership development program that prepares senior leaders to serve American colleges and universities.

    As an ACE Fellow, Blaine will focus on an issue of concern to Plymouth State University while spending the next academic year working with a college or university president and other senior officers at a host institution.

    The program combines retreats, interactive learning opportunities, campus visits and placement at another higher education institution to condense years of on-thejob experience and skills development into a single semester or year.

    Read more: The Marietta Daily Journal – Marietta woman chosen as 2015 ACE Fellow

    PSU awards 2015 Maslakowski Education award to Rose Colby

    May 8th, 2015 by Heather

      The 2015 Plymouth State University’s Dennise Maslakowski Education Award was given to Rose Colby of Epping who was chosen because of her commitment to quality, competency-based education.

      The award was created in 2008 in memory of the late Dennise Maslakowski, PSU’s former Associate Vice President for the College of Graduate Studies. “To receive this honor means a great deal because it bears Dennise’s name and it represents how deeply she valued my role in shaping the leaders of tomorrow through the education leadership program at PSU,” said Colby. “Dennise was a visionary and a tireless educator. I was incredibly moved at the news of this award.”

      Colby is currently a Competency-Based Learning and Assessment Specialist assisting schools in designing high quality competency, assessment, and grading reform systems in many states. She is a competency education specialist with the N.H. Department of Education and a member of the Advisory Board and contributor to Competency Works, the national clearinghouse and resource for innovative practices in competency education. N.H. Education Commissioner Virginia Barry praised Colby’s selection as the Maslakowski Award recipient.

      “Rose Colby’s experience over the last three decades as a NH science teacher, middle school principal, educational consultant, adjunct instructor, and transformative educational leader has made her an invaluable asset to the State of New Hampshire, and, over the last five years, to the nation,” stated Barry. “Her expertise has contributed to the enormous growth and development of new and promising K-12 competency-based learning environments across New Hampshire as well as many other states. Ever an exemplary educator, she has accomplished much by building a substantial cohort of exceptionally prepared educational leaders in schools and districts that will serve us for many years to come.”

      “I do not know any other person more dedicated to improving the educational experience for all students than Rose,” writes Esther Asbell, SAU 16’s Assistant Superintendent and Chair of New England League of Middle Schools. “She listens with intent and responds with care when working with educators. She truly has a passion for learning and for sharing that passion. I cannot think of anyone more deserving of receiving the scholarship as Rose, who has dedicated her life’s work to constantly improve the education provided to each child.”

      “What sets PSU’s education programs apart from other institutions is the faculty’s relationships with our students,” Colby said. “The Educational Leadership program is known for its ‘value added’ content; most of the faculty are practitioners in the field and bring a wealth of wisdom and experience into their interactions with students. My students know that they can contact me at any time and many of them do, especially as they consider their first administrative position. I consider it a great honor to have these mentoring relationships long after the students have completed their programs.”

      Colby earned a bachelor’s in Biology from Emmanuel College and both a master’s in Biology and an Advanced Graduate Studies Certification in School Administration from Rivier College. She is the past president of two influential Granite State educational associations, the N.H. Association of School Principals and the N.H. Science Teachers Association.

       

      PSU campus dining servathon

      May 7th, 2015 by Heather

        PLYMOUTH — Every April, Sodexo participates in their biggest Stop Hunger campaign; the Servathon. Sodexo employees from all over around the world team up to fight hunger and strengthen their local communities. Sodexo explains that “Participating in Servathon can be simple. You can dedicate a few minutes, a few hours or an entire day. Every action counts towards the success of Servathon and the fight against hunger. Select an activity and help stop hunger in your community.” At Plymouth State University, our Campus Dining Services participated in Servathon by volunteering with “Meals for Many” at the local Congregational Church.

        Meals for Many is a program that provides dinner for anyone in need every Thursday night at five o’clock. All of the food is prepared by the Director of the Meals for Many program in Plymouth. The food is then set up and served by volunteers from the Plymouth Community. I myself had the opportunity to volunteer at Meals for Many this past week. There were approximately ten volunteers from the community on this particular evening, to include Plymouth State University and Sodexo employees. We were able to provide dinner for approximately 40 people in our community.

        After dinner was served, my supervisor and I sat down and met with a few ladies from the community. We spoke about what I was studying in school and how I ended up volunteering at the Servathon. Volunteering at the Servathon and having the opportunity to meet and speak meet, speak and learn from a variety of people, was truly a great experience. I would encourage more people on our campus and in our community to reach out and do something similar. Dedicating only one hour of your day, one day a week; can truly make a positive impact on someone’s life.

        A new chapter for a nationwide food recovery network has recently been initiated at Plymouth State University. This program aims to collect surplus food from the dining services on campus provided by Sodexo and then distribute that food throughout local community networks. This community network encompasses establishments like the Pemi-Youth center, local food pantries and soup kitchens. This program helps reduce food waste while providing those in need with meals. Graduating senior, Lindsay Kipperman has worked diligently with the Green Team at Sodexo for PSU to get this program started and has also greatly strengthened connections within the community as well as helped Sodexo become more sustainable. This program will become an official chapter on May 7, and will continue to grow with the help of Sodexo and Plymouth State students.

        ccNH Department of Health and Human Services recognizes early childhood education advocates

        May 7th, 2015 by Heather

          PLYMOUTH — As a mainstay of teacher education in New Hampshire for more than a century, Plymouth State University has an exceptional reputation as a provider of and advocate for quality early child- hood education. New Hampshire’s Child Development Bureau of the New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services recently recognized two PSU employees for their support of childhood education at the 17th annual Celebration of Early Child- hood and Afterschool Professionals.

          Patricia Cantor was honored with her third Mary Stuart Gile Award for her work on the New Hampshire Early Learning Standards Task Force. Cantor, who has taught at PSU for more than 20 years, is a professor of early childhood studies and chair of the early childhood studies department. She is actively engaged in early childhood advocacy efforts with her work to increase access and quality in early care and to provide support for early childhood workers through professional development.

          The Mary Stuart Gile award recognizes early childhood professionals who engage in collaborative work to move the field forward and encourage the next generation of early childhood professionals.

          “Mary Stuart Gile has long been a strong voice for children and an advocate for early childhood in her work as an educator and a New Hampshire state legislator,” Cantor said. “As a faculty member in early childhood, I am committed to working on initiatives that support and encourage the next generation of early childhood professionals and have positive benefits for young children and their families. It’s especially rewarding to receive an award named for her.”

          Stephen Barba, PSU’s executive director of university relations, received the Early Learning NH Champions award. As a longtime resident of Dixville Notch and an influential business leader, Barba is a member of the Neil and Louise Tillotson Fund Donor Advised Committee at the New Hampshire Charitable Foundation. In that role, he has been a consistent advocate for investing millions of dollars in early childhood projects and programs in Coös County.

          “Studies find that well-focused investments in early childhood development yield high public as well as private returns,” Barba noted.

          New Hampshire is the only state in the country that holds an event annually to recognize educators and professionals working in childcare and afterschool programs.

          PSU plans archaeological dig at Enfield Shaker Village

          May 7th, 2015 by Heather

            PLYMOUTH — Enfield Shaker Village has been described as one of New Hampshire’s most magnificent architectural achievements, and beginning on May 26, it will be the site of a history-making archaeology project.

            For the first time in its history, an archaeological dig at the Village has been planned as part of a Plymouth State University archaeology course. Professor David Starbuck, renowned anthropologist and archeology expert, will oversee the project at a site where nearly 100 buildings formerly stood.

            “Enfield offers an exceptional setting in which to use archaeology to locate foundations, dumps, privies, former fence lines, pathways, mill sites and more,” said Starbuck. “While several other Shaker Villages have experienced archaeology in the past, this will be the first time that professional archaeology has been used to tell new stories about Enfield Shaker Village.”

            Enfield was one of two Shaker Villages in New Hampshire founded in 1793 to foster a communal lifestyle that promoted equality between the sexes and races, celibacy, communal ownership of property, farming and craft industries. The 3,000-acre village overlooking Mascoma Lake was an idyllic setting for the community once numbering 300 inhabitants. The largest Shaker residential building, the six-story Great Stone Dwelling (completed in 1841), was once the tallest domestic building north of Boston.

            The project’s unique location and potential for locating important artifacts is expected to be an appealing course for aspiring archaeology and anthropology students.

            Field school students and volunteers will work together under Starbuck to learn archaeological methods, to identify and process artifacts and to learn more about the distinctive lifestyle of New Hampshire’s Shakers.

            Enrollment in the Archaeological Field Methods course for undergraduate credit is available through Plymouth State University’s Continuing Education Office. The two-week sessions run from May 26—June 5 and June 8— June 19, from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. each day, Monday through Friday. Participation for a minimum of two weeks is required. The field headquarters and laboratory will be located inside the East Brethren’s Shop, and throughout the dig the Enfield Shaker Museum will host a daily lecture series open to the public.

            Starbuck is an historical and industrial archaeologist, specializing in the archaeology of America’s forts and battlefields, the archaeology of utopian societies (the Shakers) and the archaeology of medieval and post-medieval sites in Scotland. Starbuck earned a bachelor’s in anthropology from the University of Rochester and both a master’s and a doctorate in anthropology from Yale University. He has taught more than 40 summer field schools in archaeology at North American historic, prehistoric and industrial sites.

            John Clark named PSU’s 2015 Distinguished PAT Staff Member

            May 7th, 2015 by Heather

              PLYMOUTH — One of Plymouth State University’s longest-serving and most beloved employees has been recognized by his peers with the 2015 Distinguished Professional, Administrative, Technical (PAT) Award. Colleagues, family, and friends gathered to recognize Director of Athletics John Clark ’71, ’73G at a special ceremony on May 1.

              PSU President Sara Jayne Steen said Clark has worked at Plymouth State for more than 40 years and is an extraordinary professional whose commitment to the institution is unparalleled.

              “John brings to his work a vision of the campus and community,” said Steen. “And that vision has guided him to help create facilities like the Boyd Science Center and the Active Living, Learning, and Wellness (ALLWell) Center. He has mentored students, actively supported women’s equality in sports and served as a campus leader. His positive impact has been enormous.”

              Clark, a Goffstown native, has been a part of the Plymouth State community since arriving as a freshman in 1967. After graduating in 1971, he worked in a variety of roles, including residential life, admissions and director of the College Union Building before his first stint as director of athletics from 1980-85. In 1985, Clark became a member of the Plymouth State President’s Cabinet, where he served for 16 years, before returning to his role as director of athletics in 2001.

              Clark said he was surprised at being chosen for the Distinguished PAT Award.

              “I am so fortunate to have been associated with Plymouth State for almost 50 years and so proud of where the university stands today. I’m extremely excited about our future,” said Clark. “Having been involved with the PATs since our very first meetings with President Hyde in the early 1970s, I hope I have contributed to the university’s legacy of service to others. I am deeply honored to receive this award.”

              Richard “Dick” Hage, a longtime friend and colleague of Clark’s, described him as a person of vision, positive energy and productivity.

              “The University wouldn’t be where it is today without your influence in so many areas. You’ve done it all, and you’ve done it right,” said Hage. “You have the respect of all of your colleagues from every corner of campus.”

              Clark’s latest recognition joins a long list of previous accolades, including the James Hogan Award, the Senior Class Award, the Distinguished Alumni Award and the Theo Kalikow Award.

              Beginning this fall, Clark will be the founding manager of Active Living, Learning, and Wellness (ALLWell) North, PSU’s new $32 million academic and athletic facility.

              Clark and his wife, Maureen ’72, have two adult children, a son, Jamie ’03G, and a daughter, Cathleen.

              PSU’s Student Showcase of Excellence celebrates 101 research projects

              May 7th, 2015 by Heather

                PLYMOUTH — What factors determine where a person goes skiing? What do people without tattoos think of people with them? How can hiking trails be built to resist wear and tear? Those research topics and dozens more were on display at Plymouth State University’s sixth annual Student Showcase of Excellence event on April 24. More than 180 Plymouth State University students presented original research in the sciences, arts and humanities.

                Julie Bernier, PSU’s provost and vice president for academic affairs, said the student research projects are an example of exceptional educational effort.

                “This event contributes to an innovation-oriented culture of people who can work together to solve problems,” Bernier said. “Participating in this kind of hands-on, real-world research helps develop creativity, intellectual independence, critical-thinking and problem-solving skills.”

                “Students presented leading-edge research on human health and well-being, including work on cholera and heart disease. Environmental researchers presented on current challenges to our ecosystems caused by climate change. Humanities students presented topics such as the media’s impact on gender issues,” said Thad Guldbrandsen, PSU’s vice provost for research and engagement. “Much of this research has an applied focus, such as responses to Hurricane Sandy, historical research in Lancaster, and environmental risk perception among surfers in the Gulf of Maine.”

                “This is a fantastic opportunity for students to get involved with something they really enjoy,” said Colin Lamprey ’15, a biotechnology major from Salem, whose research topic was “Bacterial and Wild Yeast Beer Spoilers.” “It’s fulfilling to grow your knowledge with something that interests you.”

                Sonya MacMillan’15, an interdisciplinary studies major from Nashua, who presented “Adaptive Sports and Quality of Life,” said it’s exhilarating to know people are interested in the students’ research projects.

                “It’s really exciting to share what I’ve learned. This kind of research is very hands-on and you have to be self-motivated to stay with it,” MacMillan said.

                “Learning about a topic gives you confidence, and combined with my classroom studies, this research experience has really helped me,” said Mary Amenta ’16, a professional communications major from Simsbury, Conn., who researched “Contradictions in Women’s Magazines Impact on Women’s Body Image.”

                The event at the Hartman Union Building (HUB) on PSU’s main campus drew several hundred attendees.

                PSU President touts public-private Legacy Project partnership

                May 6th, 2015 by Heather

                  LANCASTER — This project is a wonderful guide to the historic people and places of the 251-year-old town and Coös County seat.

                  It is also an example of a public-private partnership to make a region better, in this case by preserving and making available what is important in the local history, contributing to pride of place and an awareness of how the history and vitality of a community is expressed through its people and their stories, its buildings and its landscapes.

                  Interesting history is not simply someplace else: it is here. And that matters to visitors, residents, and local students in the schools.

                  I would like to thank faculty members Linda Upham-Bornstein and President’s Council and Museum of the White Mountains Advisory Committee member Rebecca Weeks Sherrill More for their guidance of two excellent students, Michael DesRoches and Amanda Gagne. And also to thank PSU’s Center for Rural Partnership and Department of History, Philosophy, and Social Sciences Education. Part of PSU’s mission as a comprehensive university is to be engaged without region and that goal is being lived here (today).

                  Engagement goes both ways. I would also like to thank the Town of Lancaster administration, the staff of Weeks Memorial Library, the board of the Lancaster Historical Society, and the many volunteers whose willingness to work with our students made this project possible. You have offered a great contribution to our students’ educations.

                  This is an example of “hands-on, minds-on” experiential learning that our students will never forget. You made that possible.

                  Also I note the importance of funding, in this case from the Center for Rural Partnership’s Coös County Outreach Initiative funded by the Neil and Louise Tillotson Fund.

                  These partners, working together, have created a wonderful project and one that offers a tem- plate of guidance to other communities across New Hampshire that might want to create their own unique Legacy Guides.

                  The potential longterm impact for Lancaster and for New Hampshire is enormous.

                  Thank you, all of you, for your creativity and innovation, your participation and your persistence over the year of study. I hope you believe the outcome was worth the effort.

                  Heritage project created through town-gown collaboration

                  May 6th, 2015 by Heather

                    LANCASTER — The Town of Lancaster and Plymouth State University (PSU) launched a Legacy Project — “Lancaster: Stories of People and Places” — at a multi-faceted presentation on Monday afternoon, April 27, at the Weeks Memorial Library.

                    PSU five-year senior Michael “Mike” DesRoches of Stratham, who spent the past year enthusiastically researching and developing the Project with the assistance of PSU junior Amanda Gagne, took center stage to explain the work he completed with guidance from key Lancaster residents: town manager Ed Samson; Weeks’ librarian Barbara Roberts; and Elizabeth “Betty” New- ell, board member of the Lancaster Historical Society.

                    The two students worked under the direction of PSU Professor Linda Upham-Bornstein of Lancaster and volunteer on-site resource Rebecca Weeks Sherrill More, Ph.D., Visiting Scholar in the History Department at Brown University and retired director of the Sheridan Center for Teaching and Learning.

                    Samson and town planning and zoning coordinator Ben Gaetjens-Oleson asked for assistance from PSU’s Center for Rural Partnerships in developing a long-term heritage project in conjunction with the town’s 250th Anniversary in 2014.

                    DesRoches, who will receive his B.A. from PSU on May 16, did such a thorough job that, thanks to a Neil and Louise Tillotson Fund grant, he received an internship to create a Township Legacy Guide, designed to help cities and towns across the state, Upham-Bornstein explained.

                    “Mike presented the Guide at the N. H. Preservation Alliance Conference in Concord and at the PSU Student Showcase of Excellence,” she said.

                    He used well-established research protocols and techniques, including recording seven oral histories to gather historical information to gain an understanding of Lancaster’s past and recent trajectory. He interviewed Samson, Newell, Alan Savage, Edward “Midge” Rosebrook Jr., Constance Cardinal, Kenneth Walker, and Magdalena Randall. DesRoches also used town history books, microfilmed copies of this newspaper and others, obituaries, church records, tax records, and real estate records.

                    He spearheaded making new visible manifestations of the community’s history and heritage through use of today’s technologies: a local history Web site —lancasterproject.blogs.plymouth.edu with links on the right-hand side of the home page — plus scanned photos plus mobile-phone-activated Quick Response (QR) Bar Codes to use on eight signs to be placed along Main Street for a downtown walking trail to create a sense of place for residents and visitors. Rack cards will available at the town’s Welcome Center.

                    PSU resources — the Center for Rural Partnerships, the undergraduate history program, and the graduate Heritage and Historic Preservation programs — were key to the support of this Outreach Initiative.

                    PSU President Sara Jayne Steen, who will step down on June 30 from the post she has held since June30, 2006, spoke of her pride and pleasure in the students’ work and the collaborative efforts of PSU professors and programs. When Steen stepped to the podium, Samson said, “She doesn’t look like a president!”

                    Others from PSU on hand included Provost & vice president of Academic Affairs Julie Bernier; Steve Barba, who also is stepping down from his University Relations post on June 30 and plans to write his memories of The Balsams; Marcia Schmidt Blaine, Ph.D, of the Department of History, Philosophy, & Social Studies Education; and Director Ben Amsden (blamsden@plymouth. edu) of the Center for Rural Partnerships.

                    PSU employees honored at 17th annual Celebration of Early Childhood Professionals

                    May 5th, 2015 by Heather

                      PLYMOUTH — New Hampshire’s Child Development Bureau of the NH Department of Health and Human Services recently recognized two Plymouth State University employees, Patricia Cantor and Stephen Barba, for their support of childhood education at the 17th annual Celebration of Early Childhood and Afterschool Professionals.

                      Cantor was honored with her third Mary Stuart Gile Award for her work on the NH Early Learning Standards Task Force. Cantor, who has taught at PSU for more than 20 years, is a professor of early childhood studies and chair of the early childhood studies department. She is actively engaged in early childhood advocacy efforts with her work to increase access and quality in early care and to provide support for early childhood workers through professional development.

                      The Mary Stuart Gile award recognizes early childhood professionals who engage in collaborative work to move the field forward and encourage the next generation of early childhood professionals.

                      “Mary Stuart Gile has long been a strong voice for children and an advocate for early childhood in her work as an educator and a NH state legislator,” Cantor said. “As a faculty member in early childhood, I am committed to working on initiatives that support and encourage the next generation of early childhood professionals and have positive benefits for young children and their families. It’s especially rewarding to receive an award named for her.”

                      Barba, PSU’s executive director of university relations, received the Early Learning NH Champions award. As a longtime resident of Dixville Notch and an influential business leader, Barba is a member of the Neil and Louise Tillotson Fund Donor Advised Committee at the New Hampshire Charitable Foundation. In that role, he has been a consistent advocate for investing millions of dollars in early childhood projects and programs in Coös County.

                      “Studies find that well-focused investments in early childhood development yield high public as well as private returns,” Barba noted.

                      New Hampshire is the only state in the country that holds an event annually to recognize educators and professionals working in childcare and afterschool programs.

                       

                      Featured in Plymouth Magazine

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                      PEOPLE FIRST: The Presidency of Sara Jayne Steen

                      In her introductory remarks for her first Faculty Day on August 23, 2006, President Steen said, “PSU’s future is something we’ll shape together.” What follows are just some of the many initiatives launched and nurtured during her presidency, as told by the people who worked with her to shape them.

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                      A Life Unfolds in Letters

                      Norton Bagley’s life reads like the script for a Hollywood movie …

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                      Generous Nature

                      To honor her mother’s memory, Shaughn Bolton established a scholarship to support environmental science and policy students—tomorrow’s environmental leaders.