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PSU Art faculty share experience and artistic vision in 2014 Faculty Exhibition

September 11th, 2014 by Heather

    PLYMOUTH — The Karl Drerup Art Gallery and Exhibitions Program at Plymouth State University will present the 2014 Faculty Art Exhibition Sept. 3–Oct. 2 at the Karl Drerup Art Gallery on North Main Street in Plymouth.

    Gallery Director Cynthia Robinson says the faculty show is a particularly good way to introduce students and visitors to PSU Art Department faculty as artists, and demonstrate how their personal work connects with the PSU art curriculum and art students.

    “The faculty exhibit is a wonderfully popular show with excellent work by our talented faculty—it always has something for everyone in a variety of media including ceramic, photography, mixed media, painting and design,” Robinson said.

    Photographer John Anderson is creating an installation in a space newly titled “Karl’s Shoebox” after gallery namesake Karl Drerup, who founded the Department of Art at Plymouth State.

    Robinson describes the Shoebox as “a small, enclosed space in the corner of the main gallery that will be used this year for shorter-term exhibits that are interactive, innovative and invite a closer look.”

    In this instance, Anderson will install panoramic photographs on the walls and ceiling of the space that will give the viewer a sense of being inside a New Hampshire covered bridge. Anderson perceives covered bridges in New Hampshire as historic treasures that connect and join the land across a river, allowing families to be joined, commerce and travel to happen and communities to expand.

    “The historical importance of bridges, their engineering significance and the their settings among beautiful landscapes all add to their interest to me,” Anderson says.

    The Faculty Exhibition will include unique artworks including a large wall drawing by Kimberly Anderson Ritchie, a 16-foot-long sculpture by Philip Lonergan, and large photographs by new PSU art faculty member Scott Bulger. Other contributing faculty artists are Annette Mitchell, Nick Sevigney, Michael Heffernan, Kathi Smith, Pam Anneser, Penny Huynen, Jason Swith, Terry Downs, Tom Driscoll, Bill Haust and Carol Jowdy.

    Two other programs honoring Professor Drerup are being introduced this year. Following gallery talks by faculty from 4–5 p.m. Sept. 17, gallery fellow Hannah Smith will introduce the first Jammin’ at Karl’s music event at 5:30 p.m. in the gallery. PSU senior Melodey Rose Mathews, a songwriter, singer and guitarist (and ukulele) will perform some of her own songs and covers of other artists’ works.

    “Lights, Camera, KDAG!” a new film series, will premier Oct. 11 at noon, in conjunction with the exhibition “And Now Behind Curtain #2.”

    Robinson says The Karl Drerup Art Gallery and Exhibitions Pro- gram is dedicated to promoting interdisciplinary understanding of art and visual culture.

    “We are working to make the gallery an approachable, accessible and interactive space. There will be a lot going on this year,” she says.

    Gallery hours are Monday-Friday, 10 a.m.–4 p.m., Wednesday 10 a.m.–8 p.m. and Saturday 1–4 p.m. The gallery is closed on Sundays and PSU holidays.

    Information about the Karl Drerup Art Gallery is online at Plymouth.edu/gallery. Visitors can also find information on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

    General information about events at Plymouth State University is online at ThisWeek@ PSU, http://thisweek.blogs.plymouth.edu.

    PSU Announces 2014 Distinguished Faculty

    September 11th, 2014 by Heather

      Professors Paul Rogalus, Scott Coykendall and Mark Green Honored

      PLYMOUTH — Professors Paul Rogalus, Scott Coykendall and Mark Green were honored by their Plymouth State University faculty colleagues at the institution’s annual Faculty Day event Aug. 27.

      Julie Bernier, PSU’s Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost, presented Green with the Award for Distinguished Scholarship, and Rogalus received the Award for Faculty Service. Coykendall received the Faculty Advising Award from Student Senate member Evan Gaudette on behalf of the student body.

      “I am so pleased and honored to have the opportunity to recognize faculty excellence this morning with three awards,” said Bernier. “It is particularly satisfying to be able to honor such wonderful and deserving colleagues.”

      Paul Rogalus, Professor of English, has been a member of the PSU faculty for 24 years. Aside from his classroom responsibilities, he helps students find their passion and get the most from their college experience through his work with numerous student organizations, including Poets & Writers, PSU’s student literary club; Mentoring Enhances Student Achievement (MESA), the English department’s peer mentoring program; and WPCR, the student-run radio station.

      Rogalus feels that the most important thing he has done through his service is help students make the most of their college experience by participating in student organizations.

      “Much of the growth a student experiences during his or her college career takes place outside of the classroom through student organizations that give them opportunities to try new things, find what they have a passion for, and develop skills not just for college, but for life,” he said.

      Coykendall, a Communications and Media Studies Assistant Professor since 2002, was chosen for the Advising Award, which was created and managed by the undergraduate student body to recognize outstanding advising from a faculty member. Gaudette, a senior meteorology major from Nashua, presented the award on behalf of the entire undergraduate student body.

      “Scott’s name came up many times in the submissions from the student body touting his caring manner,” Gaudette said. “For this dedication to all his students, there could not have been a more deserving winner of this award.”

      “Advising is such an important part of teaching, it’s really gratifying to have my students succeed and to be a part of that success,” said Coykendall.

      Mark Green, Professor of Hydrology, joined the graduate faculty in the Center for the Environment and the Department of Environmental Science and Policy at Plymouth State University in 2009. At PSU, Green fulfills a dual role teaching graduate-level classes and acting as a research hydrologist at the Northern Forest Research Station. This unique combination of responsibilities positions Green as a “bridge,” connecting and engaging students in his work. Green also travelled to Japan last year as a Fulbright researcher. With Japanese colleagues, Green studied hydrologic data from US and Japanese forests to understand how forests and hydrologic function recover from disturbance.

      “Gaining an understanding of the larger questions about human-water-environmental interactions goes far beyond Plymouth and even the US,” said Green. “Working collaboratively, we have a valuable opportunity to find answers that can apply around the world.”

      More than 200 fulltime faculty are employed by Plymouth State University.

      PSU celebrates new year at Fall Convocation

      September 11th, 2014 by Heather

        Honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters awarded to Joseph Nye, Jr.

        PLYMOUTH — One of the nation’s most important leaders in international relations was honored by Plymouth State University at its convocation ceremony Sept. 2.

        Joseph S. Nye, Jr. received an Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters, presented by PSU President Sara Jayne Steen.

        Convocation is the assembly of the University’s community and incoming students, and it marks the formal start of a new academic year. Also attending the ceremony were University System of New Hampshire Board Chair Pamela Diamantis, Chancellor Todd Leach, and trustees John Rist and Wally Stevens.

        After a welcome message from Alex Herbst, PSU student body president, PSU President Sara Jayne Steen encouraged the Class of 2018 to embrace the opportunity of higher education.

        “Today marks your entry into a learning community that celebrates academic excellence,” said Steen. “PSU is a place that believes in people and in ideas and engagement. That is what it means to be a learner, to engage with others in assessing past ideas and developing innovative ideas that may transform the world. All of us here and your other student colleagues are part of this community, and we hope that you, too, find joy in it.”

        Nye served as Dean of Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, and with the Department of Defense, the National Intelligence Council, and the State Department. In 2005 Nye was voted one of the ten most influential scholars of international relations in the United States and in 2011 named one of the world’s most important global thinkers. He told the first-year students they all have the capacity to become leaders.

        “Take the next four years at Plymouth State University…set yourself a goal, and that’s to spend the next four years in teaching yourself leadership, and I tell you that you will succeed,” said Nye.

        Plymouth Select Board Chair Valerie Scarborough asked students to become part of the community.

        “Be a part of the dynamic partnership between PSU and the town of Plymouth,” said Scarborough. “Get to know us, and let us get to know you. Plymouth will be an even better place because you are here.”

        Keynote speaker Mark Fischler, Professor of Criminal Justice, who is PSU’s 2014 Distinguished Teaching Award recipient then provided points of emphasis for the first-year students.

        “Don’t quit or give up; life is full of ups and downs. The key is your ability to persevere and fight through those ups and downs,” Fischler said.

        “Relationships matter. The core piece of building positive relationships is through treating everyone with dignity and respect.

        “Realize you have a lot to learn. And give 100 percent. It means taking each and every class seriously,” he added.

        Plymouth State’s Class of 2018 is comprised of approximately 800 entering students who were chosen from nearly 4,800 applicants. The class includes students from 20 states and Canada, China, Sweden, Australia, Saudi Arabia, Belgium and Bhutan. In her closing, President Steen urged the incoming class to focus on making the world better.

        “The Plymouth State motto, Ut Prosim, reminds us to imagine and engage and experience,” she noted. “Welcome, Class of 2018, to our community, now yours as well.”

        PSU’s Center for the Environment celebrates 10th anniversary

        September 11th, 2014 by Heather

          PLYMOUTH — One of New Hampshire’s most effective environmental research and protection organizations celebrated its tenth anniversary Aug. 29.

          The Center for the Environment (CFE) at Plymouth State University was created in 2004 to study the science, policies, culture, and economics of the natural environment in northern New England through research, education, and collaboration. In addressing a gathering at the Squam Lakes Association in Holderness, Plymouth State President Sara Jayne Steen said the CFE has provided expert support and expertise in environmental matters critical to the region and the state.

          “Since 2004, the Center for the Environment has been a resource for research in New Hampshire’s ecosystem, providing critical information for decision makers and linking scientists and local state and federal agencies and the public,” noted Steen. “It is a key regional and state player in promoting a sustainable future, creating powerful partnerships that benefit the State of New Hampshire and communities throughout the region. Its cutting edge research focused on environmental science as it relates to New Hampshire’s ecosystem, society and economy has far reaching benefits that improve life in New Hampshire. And it is educating the next generation of environmental scientists.”

          In the past decade, CFE’s efforts have directly benefited the people and environment of the Granite State, including projects on water quality, land conservation, acid rain, watershed protection and climate change.

          President Steen stated the CFE has forged valuable partnerships in their environmental research and protection efforts, including White Mountain National Forest, Hubbard Brook Research Foundation, Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, the Squam Lakes Natural Science Center, the Squam Lakes Conservation Society, and the NH Department of Environmental Services.

          Steen also acknowledged Bertha Fauver of Plymouth and Sid Lovett of Holderness who advocated for the establishment of the CFE and helped in its creation.

          Commissioner Tom Burack of the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services, was the keynote speaker and praised CFE’s accomplishments.

          “The Center is fundamentally doing what needs to be done here in the northern end of our Lakes Region and the gateway to the White Mountains,” Burack said. “Through numerous projects, it is gathering and assessing data that helps local citizens, leaders and communities to better understand the health of their environment and to make better informed decisions about how the environment’s health can be improved.”

          Burack also expressed excitement about continued collaboration with the CFE and its contributions to the state, “In many ways, part of DES’s dream would be to have a Center for the Environment in every part of the state.”

          As for the CFE’s future, Director Joe Boyer said environmental awareness and sustainability issues are gaining support around the globe, particularly in the business community, and the CFE is promoting this idea.

          “We need to encourage business and industry to become more a part of the ecosystem,” Boyer said. “Some corporations are already starting to recognize the benefits of this idea.”

          Boyer added that the CFE’s future plans also include developing new environmental sensors.

          “Environmental sensing technology is advancing rapidly and I think CFE can play a big part in this arena,” Boyer said. “To that end, we are in the process of re-purposing our main labs to begin developing new sensor technology and new sensor applications. The WatSen Lab will be a R&D test bed for developing cheap, yet sophisticated, sensors which can be deployed by the thousands across New Hampshire.”

          Boyer also reminded the audience that public and private support is critical for CFE to continue to remain a cornerstone for environmental education.

          “We want to keep attracting bright and dedicated students to the program. To do that we need to increase our endowed fellowships and scholarship awards,” he said.

          The CFE, which is located in the Russell House on the PSU campus, also sponsors and hosts the New Hampshire Water and Watershed Conference, an annual event held at the University.

          PSU earns high national ranking in critical thinking and problem solving skills test

          September 11th, 2014 by Heather

            PLYMOUTH — Plymouth State University students rank in the 95th percentile in the United States for “value added” knowledge, or knowledge and skills gained during the undergraduate years according to the Collegiate Learning Assessment (CLA), a standardized test. The results show Plymouth State University students make key gains in critical thinking and problem solving skills during the four years they spend in the classroom, labs and in research activities.

            The Collegiate Learning Assessment (CLA) uses a “value-added” outcome measurement to examine a college or university’s contribution to student learning. The CLA measures critical thinking, analytic reasoning, problem solving, and written communication skills. The assessment consists of open-ended scenarios that require thoughtful written responses. David Zehr, PSU’s Associate Vice President for Undergraduate Studies, says Plymouth State tests incoming first-year students and graduating seniors to gauge how much they’ve learned in four years.

            “Along with course content we’re teaching them valuable skills like problem solving, critical thinking, reasoning with quantitative information, and effective writing,” Zehr said. “It says we’re doing what we ought to be doing: we’re taking students through their four-year education and helping them to develop the skills they’re going to need to be successful in the job marketplace and in life.”

            Each school participating in the CLA has a predicted value added score, based on students’ SAT scores and other factors. Zehr noted PSU exceeded expectations by placing in the 95th percentile for “value added” knowledge, or knowledge and skills gained during the undergraduate years.

            “For all of the schools that participated in the CLA, we’re in the top five percent on the value added dimension,” said Zehr. “Based on these test results, our faculty can take great pride in the work they do with our students.”

            The CLA was developed in 2002 by the Council for Aid to Education; since then more than 1,000 colleges and high schools have participated in the program. PSU’s institutional report was released Aug. 28.

            PSU Earns High National Ranking in Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills Test

            September 10th, 2014 by Lynn

              PLYMOUTH — Plymouth State University students rank in the 95th percentile in the United States for “value added” knowledge, or knowledge and skills gained during the undergraduate years according to the Collegiate Learning Assessment (CLA), a standardized test. The results show Plymouth State University students make key gains in critical thinking and problem solving skills during the four years they spend in the classroom, labs and in research activities.

              The Collegiate Learning Assessment (CLA) uses a “value-added” outcome measurement to examine a college or university’s contribution to student learning. The CLA measures critical thinking, analytic reasoning, problem solving, and written communication skills. The assessment consists of open-ended scenarios that require thoughtful written responses. David Zehr, PSU’s Associate Vice President for Undergraduate Studies, says Plymouth State tests incoming first-year students and graduating seniors to gauge how much they’ve learned in four years.

              “Along with course content we’re teaching them valuable skills like problem solving, critical thinking, reasoning with quantitative information, and effective writing,” Zehr said. “It says we’re doing what we ought to be doing: we’re taking students through their four-year education and helping them to develop the skills they’re going to need to be successful in the job marketplace and in life.”

              Each school participating in the CLA has a predicted value added score, based on students’ SAT scores and other factors. Zehr noted PSU exceeded expectations by placing in the 95th percentile for “value added” knowledge, or knowledge and skills gained during the undergraduate years.

              “For all of the schools that participated in the CLA, we’re in the top five percent on the value added dimension,” said Zehr. “Based on these test results, our faculty can take great pride in the work they do with our students.”

              The CLA was developed in 2002 by the Council for Aid to Education; since then more than 1,000 colleges and high schools have participated in the program. PSU’s institutional report was released August 28.

              PSU emergency siren to be tested Wednesday

              September 9th, 2014 by Lynn

                By BOB MARTIN | Sep 08, 2014

                Plymouth — Those in Plymouth will hear a loud siren on Wednesday, but have no fear — this is merely an annual testing of Plymouth State University’s emergency system.

                Testing for the PSU Alert Emergency Outdoor Siren will begin at noon on Wednesday, and at that time the siren will sound for about five minutes in 30-second intervals.

                Public Relations Officer Timothy Kershner explained that the test can be hear all around the campus, and while it is only intended for the town of Plymouth, the surrounding towns of Holderness and Campton may faintly hear the siren in the distance.

                “The siren will be quite loud,” said Kershner.

                Kershner said that students and local businesses have been notified over the past couple of weeks that the test would be taking place so it would not scare people. He said that emails have been sent out to students over the past two days, as the reminders have picked up intensity.

                On Wednesday, just before the siren test, a text alert will be sent out to students and PSU staff as well.

                “We are really testing the whole system,” said Kershner. “On Wednesday we will send out alerts through text, email and social media, in the same way we would in an actual emergency. We are focused on ensuring the communications system is working effectively.”

                The test is done twice a year, with the next one coming in the second Wednesday in February. The alarm otherwise only sounds when there is threat of imminent danger on campus. Kershner explained that the siren was installed in 2010 and is intended to let students know that there is an emergency of some sort. Kershner said that it is part of the continuous effort for the university to update the alert system, which over the past few years has shifted to integrate social media.

                It is only a siren, and not a message involved. The siren, he said, should trigger students to check the university website, PSU Alert Line and text alerts for instructions in the event of an emergency. The horn can be activated by police vehicles and other mobile means in the case of an on-campus emergency.

                Kershner explained that PSU has reached out to the Town of Plymouth and the Plymouth Area Chamber of Commerce so everyone is well aware that the test will be going on.

                There is only one horn used for these emergencies, and it is located on a pole adjacent to the Hartman Union Building on High Street. It should be heard by anyone within about a one-mile radius. Kershner said that there will be emergency management officials located throughout the campus to verify that the entire campus can hear the signal, as well as assisting individuals in locating the nearest building to shelter in place until the conclusion of the test.

                Residents, staff and patrons of local businesses are urged by officials to shelter in place while the siren is sounded. There will be PSU staff, safety personnel, police and emergency responders on-hand.

                “We want to be sure that we can keep students informed whenever a situation may arise,” said Kershner.

                 

                Trio Veritas performing at PSU’s Silver Center for the Arts on September 21

                September 9th, 2014 by Lynn

                  PLYMOUTH — Violinist Sasha Callahan and cellist Leo Eguchi will join PSU Professor Dan Perkins at 1 p.m. September 21 at Plymouth State University, as Trio Veritas performs works by Shostakovich, Haydn and Stookey at the Silver Center for the Arts.
                  Callaghan and Eguchi, who are husband and wife, are known to regional audiences as New Hampshire Music Festival (NHMF) artists. Perkins is professor of music and director of choral activities at Plymouth State and also serves as principal guest conductor and director of choral activities for NHMF.
                  The trio will perform Piano Trio in E minor, op. 67 by Dmitri Shostakovich, Joseph Haydn’s Piano Trio in A, and a relatively new work, Piano Trio No.1 by Nathaniel Stookey. Perkins says Shostakovich composed the selected piano trio in 1943-44 as a lamentation for the death of his close friend, musicologist Ivan Sollertinsky and victims of the Holocaust, the news of which did not reach the U.S.S.R. until the liberation of the concentration camps began. “It is edgy and cynical, employing scales and rhythms of Jewish folk music,” Perkins states.
                  The Haydn trio is a mature work and unique in its two-movement form, the first of which Perkins describes as “an elegant adagio.” The second movement contrasts the first with “a rollicking, vivace dance.”
                  Stookey’s piano trio was commissioned by The Lee Trio and premiered in 2009 at Berkeley. It is dedicated to the Lee sisters (Angela, Lisa and Melinda), in honor of their maternal grandmother, Shih Kwok-Shing, who celebrated her 100th birthday last year and has been a very important and constant figure in the sisters’ lives. Each of the three movements is named for one of the sisters, using the Chinese names given to them by their grandmother, and prominently features their chosen instrument.
                  Tickets for the concert are $15 for adults, $14 for seniors and $12 for youth at the Silver Center Box Office, (603) 535-2787 or (800) 779-3869. Tickets are also available online at silver.plymouth.edu.

                  PSU’s Center for the Environment Celebrates 10th Anniversary

                  September 8th, 2014 by Lynn

                    PLYMOUTH — One of New Hampshire’s most effective environmental research and protection organizations celebrated its tenth anniversary August 29. The Center for the Environment (CFE) at Plymouth State University was created in 2004 to study the science, policies, culture, and economics of the natural environment in northern New England through research, education, and collaboration. In addressing a gathering at the Squam Lakes Association in Holderness, Plymouth State President Sara Jayne Steen said the CFE has provided expert support and expertise in environmental matters critical to the region and the state.

                    “Since 2004, the Center for the Environment has been a resource for research in New Hampshire’s ecosystem, providing critical information for decision makers and linking scientists and local state and federal agencies and the public,” noted Steen. “It is a key regional and state player in promoting a sustainable future, creating powerful partnerships that benefit the State of New Hampshire and communities throughout the region. Its cutting edge research focused on environmental science as it relates to New Hampshire’s ecosystem, society and economy has far reaching benefits that improve life in New Hampshire. And it is educating the next generation of environmental scientists.”

                    In the past decade, CFE’s efforts have directly benefited the people and environment of the Granite State, including projects on water quality, land conservation, acid rain, watershed protection and climate change.

                    President Steen stated the CFE has forged valuable partnerships in their environmental research and protection efforts, including White Mountain National Forest, Hubbard Brook Research Foundation, Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, the Squam Lakes Natural Science Center, the Squam Lakes Conservation Society, and the NH Department of Environmental Services.

                    Steen also acknowledged Bertha Fauver of Plymouth and Sid Lovett of Holderness who advocated for the establishment of the CFE and helped in its creation.

                    Commissioner Tom Burack of the NH Department of Environmental Services, was the keynote speaker and praised CFE’s accomplishments.

                    “The Center is fundamentally doing what needs to be done here in the northern end of our Lakes Region and the gateway to the White Mountains,” Burack said. “Through numerous projects it is gathering and assessing data that helps local citizens, leaders and communities to better understand the health of their environment and to make better informed decisions about how the environment’s health can be improved.”

                    Burack also expressed excitement about continued collaboration with the CFE and its contributions to the state, “In many ways, part of DES’s dream would be to have a Center for the Environment in every part of the state.”

                    As for the CFE’s future, Director Joe Boyer said environmental awareness and sustainability issues are gaining support around the globe, particularly in the business community, and the CFE is promoting this idea.

                    “We need to encourage business and industry to become more a part of the ecosystem,” Boyer said. “Some corporations are already starting to recognize the benefits of this idea.”

                    Boyer added that the CFE’s future plans also include developing new environmental sensors.

                    “Environmental sensing technology is advancing rapidly and I think CFE can play a big part in this arena,” Boyer said. “To that end, we are in the process of re-purposing our main labs to begin developing new sensor technology and new sensor applications. The WatSen Lab will be a R&D test bed for developing cheap, yet sophisticated, sensors which can be deployed by the thousands across New Hampshire.”

                    Boyer also reminded the audience that public and private support is critical for CFE to continue to remain a cornerstone for environmental education. “We want to keep attracting bright and dedicated students to the program. To do that we need to increase our endowed fellowships and scholarship awards,” he said.

                    The CFE, which is located in the Russell House on the PSU campus, also sponsors and hosts the New Hampshire Water and Watershed Conference, an annual event held at the University.

                    PSU will no longer require SAT/ACT test scores

                    September 4th, 2014 by Lynn

                    PLYMOUTH — There will be one less requirement in the application packet for students applying to Plymouth State University.

                    The central New Hampshire university announced this week that it will no longer require applicants to submit SAT or ACT test scores beginning with students entering in Spring, 2015. Instead, Plymouth State will continue to concentrate on a student’s high school record as the primary factor in offering admission.

                    “Standardized test scores simply don’t provide much value for our counselors when determining an applicant’s academic  reparation,” said Assistant Vice President of Enrollment Management Andrew Palumbo.

                    While many schools still require standardized test scores in their application process, Palumbo says Plymouth State is “taking the opportunity to re-evaluate what is truly meaningful when we craft our incoming class.”

                    Plymouth State University joins a growing movement among universities and colleges nationwide by no longer basing its admissions decisions on standardized test scores.

                    In recent years, Plymouth State officials have looked more to high school grades, especially grades in core subject areas of English, math, science, social studies and foreign language. Still, some students find their SAT or ACT scores are a point of pride. Plymouth will continue to accept scores from applicants that choose to submit their test results. But, adds Palumbo, standardized test scores are not as accurate as an applicant’s high school career in predicting success in college for most students.

                    Palumbo emphasized that a “test-optional” admissions process does not mean the University is lowering admissions standards. Plymouth State, he says, is more interested in actual academic performance and the rigor of an applicant’s course selection than in the applicant’s score on a standardized test.

                    “Plymouth is one of a small number of schools that recalculates each applicant’s high school grade point average to focus solely on the core subject areas of English, math, science, social studies and foreign language,” he explained. “We also give extra weight to more challenging courses.”

                    This practice, he says, rewards critical reasoning and communication skills over the “quick decision-making skills that timed standardized tests measure.”

                    The University also considers each applicant’s extracurricular involvement, an admissions essay, and an academic recommendation from a high school teacher.

                    “Plymouth State is a special institution that offers excellent academic opportunities within an engaging residential community,” Palumbo said. “We owe it to our students to leave behind older methods of evaluating applicants that are no longer relevant. We are looking for a diverse group of students who will bring far more to our community than their test scores.”

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