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Saul O Sidore Lecture Series at PSU presents Lawrence Lessig

September 9th, 2014 by Lynn

PLYMOUTH—The Saul O Sidore Lecture Series at Plymouth State University will present Harvard professor Lawrence Lessig, speaking on “How New Hampshire Saved America,” at 7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 11, in the Smith Recital Hall at the Silver Center for the Arts on Main Street in Plymouth.

Lessig says, “New Hampshire has a critical role in restoring the Republic that the Framers promised.”

Americans believe our government is broken, and according to a recent Gallup Poll, fixing the government is the most important issue for Republicans, Democrats, and Independents.

In his talk, Professor Lessig explains his view of the fundamental corruption that has taken hold of our government, and how “We the People” have lost touch with our Framers’ values. He examines how recent efforts—including the ongoing “New Hampshire Rebellion”—are mobilizing citizens to band together to form a movement capable of effecting fundamental and lasting change.

Lawrence Lessig is the Roy L. Furman Professor of Law and Leadership at the Harvard Law School, director of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard University and author of “Republic, Lost: How Money Corrupts Congress—and a Plan to Stop It.”

Prior to rejoining the Harvard faculty, Lessig was a professor at Stanford Law School, where he founded the school’s Center for Internet and Society, and at the University of Chicago. He clerked for Judge Richard Posner on the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals and Justice Antonin Scalia on the United States Supreme Court.

Lessig serves on the Board of the AXA Research Fund, and on the advisory boards of Creative Commons and the Sunlight Foundation. He holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in economics and a Bachelor of Science degree in management from the University of Pennsylvania, a Master of Arts in philosophy from Cambridge, and a Juris Doctor from Yale. He was named one of Scientific American’s Top 50 Visionaries.

The theme for this year’s Sidore Lecture Series is “The State of Democracy.” The series’ premise is that Americans consider our political system to be the premier model of democracy, and that we like to think that others throughout the world wish to emulate us. But the democratic nature of our institutions cannot be taken for granted and they need to be examined and reexamined.

Headlines in the news—about growing inequality, money in politics, changes in voter registration laws, government surveillance, and setbacks of democratic movement in various parts of the world—suggest that now is a good time for reflecting on the state of democracy in the United States and elsewhere.

The next speaker in the series will be Thomas Patterson, speaking on “News and Democracy: Why Are Citizens So Misinformed?” Tuesday, Oct. 21 at 7 p.m. at the Silver Center.

Named for humanitarian and New Hampshire businessman Saul O Sidore, the Sidore Lecture Series was established in 1979 by PSU and the Sidore Memorial Foundation. The series brings a variety of speakers to campus to address critical issues and events in politics, society and culture—topics that reflect Sidore’s interests.

All Sidore Lectures are free and open to the public, but reservations are recommended. A reception follows each lecture. Free tickets are available at the Silver Center Box Office, 535-2787 or (800) 779-3869.

General information about events at PSU is available at ThisWeek@PSU, http://thisweek.blogs.plymouth.edu.

General information about events at Plymouth State University is online at ThisWeek@PSU, http://thisweek.blogs.plymouth.edu.

 

PSU Alumni Association honors seven for excellence and service

October 16th, 2013 by Heather

PSU Alumni Association honors seven for excellence and service

PSUAA 2013 Award Recipients, from the left, are Rodney Ekstrom, ’09G, PSU Director of Alumni Relations; Harold Roy, ’05, Recent Alumni Award of Excellence; Sue Farris, ’12G, Outstanding Graduate Alumni Award; Michael Goldenberg,’84, Ut Prosim Award; Zachariah Goldenberg,’13, Graduating Senior Award of Excellence; Jason Lyon, ’94, Distinguished Alumni Service Award; Terri Dautcher, Faculty/Staff Award of Excellence; and PSU President Sara Jayne Steen. Missing from photo, Susan Kline, ’74, Alumni Achievement Award. COURTESY

 PLYMOUTH — Six Plymouth State University alumni and one PSU faculty member were honored at a ceremony during the University’s annual Homecoming and Family Celebration Oct. 4-6.

In this annual recognition event, the Plymouth State University Alumni Association honors alumni, faculty, staff, students and friends for outstanding service to the University, their communities and other alumni. PSU’s Director of Alumni Relations, Rodney Ekstrom ’09G, said the seven awardees have made a lasting, positive impression on the University.

“Our motto, Ut prosim (that I may serve), is a living one for our students through service learning and community involvement.” Ekstrom said. “These award recipients continue to serve their home communities and Plymouth State. Their individual and collective impact is tremendous, and is a powerful reflection of the caliber of alumni we graduate and faculty we attract.”

The 2013PSU Alumni Association honorees include:

Alumni Achievement
Award
Susan Kline ’74
Founder and Director of the
Kline School
Costa Mesa, Calif.

Distinguished Alumni Service
Award
Jason Lyon ’94
CEO, Common Man Family of
Restaurants
Ashland

Graduating Senior Award
of Excellence
Zachariah Goldenberg ’13
General Securities Financial
Representative, Fidelity Investments Barrington

Faculty/Staff Award of
Excellence
Terri Dautcher

Faculty member in the College
of Business Administration
Ashland

Outstanding Graduate
Alumni Award
Sue Farris ’12G
Supported Employment Specialist, Center for Life Management
Allentown

Recent Alumni Award
of Excellence
Harold Roy ’05
Founder and CEO, Healthcare
Security International
Revere, Mass.

Ut Prosim Award
Michael Goldenberg ’84
Associate Athletic Director, The
Lawrenceville School
Lawrenceville, N.J.

Information about the PSUAA recognition awards is available from Rodney Ekstrom, raekstrom@plymouth.edu.

“The People’s Forest” competes at N.H. Film Festival

October 16th, 2013 by Lynn

PLYMOUTH––A documentary film about the creation of America’s national forests is competing at the New Hampshire Film Festival in Portsmouth, Oct. 17-20. “The People’s Forest: The Story of the White Mountain National Forest,” was produced by David Huntley of Moore-Huntley productions and focuses on the mix of manmade disasters, colorful characters, citizen activism and political courage that brought about the protection of our National Forests and Grasslands through the Weeks Act of 1911. Plymouth State University collaborated with Huntley on the creation of the 48-minute documentary. PSU Vice Provost for Research and Engagement Dr. Thad Guldbrandsen said the film offers a fascinating glimpse of how our national forests in the eastern United States were created and protected.

“This documentary of the Weeks Act is a remarkable piece of work,” Guldbrandsen said, “We are fortunate to have worked with David Huntley, a worldclass film maker with roots in the White Mountains.”

As the film illustrates, events in New Hampshire’s North Country at the turn of the twentieth century had effects far beyond the White Mountains, including severe flooding of the Pemigewasset, Merrimack in 1895 and 1896. These floods forced the closing of mills and other factories that depended on waterways like the Merrimack River for hydroelectric power. Thousands of people were out of work and many blamed the flooding on the impact of deforestation in the White Mountains. Citizens began to realize the connections among natural systems such as forests, watershed and rivers.

Standing in the way of Weeks’ Bill was a bitterly divided Congress, which had debated similar conservation legislation in previous sessions. What was new was an unlikely alliance of citizen groups, conservationists and business leaders from urban areas south of the White Mountains. The film shows the Weeks Act’s enduring impact on the landscape of New Hampshire and the United States. In the century since its passage, more than fifty-two national forests and grasslands in forty-one states, more than twenty million acres, are now protected.

“While the dramatic chain of events depicted in the program took place well over a century ago,” Huntley said,” the people involved and issues they confronted still crackle with unmistakable life and meaning.”

For “The People’s Forest,” Huntley collaborated with Plymouth State University’s Center for Rural Partnerships and The Museum of the White Mountains.

Founded in 2001, the New Hampshire Film Festival (NHFF) has grown to be a recognized and viable venue for showcasing quality filmmaking. Over its four-day run, nearly 10,000 people are expected to attend film screenings, workshops and panel discussions.

“The People’s Forest” will be competing in the Festival’s New Hampshire Program category, comprised of productions featuring Granite State filmmakers, writers, actors and producers.

For more information about this release, contact Bruce Lyndes, PSU Media Relations manager, 535-2775 or blyndes@plymouth.edu.

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