Hospital, Grafton County Incubator Receive Northern Borders Grants

November 6th, 2013 by Lynn

    Hospital, Grafton County Incubator Receive Northern Borders Grants

    CONCORD— The Upper Connecticut Valley Hospital in Colebrook and the Grafton County Economic Development Council in Plymouth will receive grants totaling nearly $350,000 from the Northern Border Regional Commission.

    New Hampshire’s northernmost hospital will use its $200,000 grant toward replacing its aging cardiac monitoring system, which can no longer be serviced with replacement parts. UCVH will match the grant to cover the $372,000 replacement cost.

    The Grafton County Economic Development Council, which is receiving $145,000, will use the funding to complete construction of its Enterprise Center at Plymouth, being developed in conjunction with Plymouth State University. The total cost of the project is $290,000.

    “These two awards will be of great benefit, not only to Upper Connecticut Valley Hospital and the Grafton County Economic Development Council, but to the many communities they serve,” said Gov. Maggie Hassan in announcing the grants. “These grants will help improve and modernize health care for the North Country and encourage new business development, helping to preserve and create jobs in our rural communities.”

    Patients at UCVH faced traveling great distances for treatment if the cardiac monitoring system went off-line and would have cost jobs at the hospital, which also serves communities in neighboring Vermont and Maine.

    With the new Enterprise Center at Plymouth poised to open with 100 percent of its space already leased, the funding supports an additional 10,000-square foot of incubator space. This will accommodate new tenants, creating additional jobs in Grafton County.

    The Northern Border Regional Commission was created as a federal-state partnership approved in the 2008 Farm Bill, with a mission to address the economic and community development needs in distressed communities in the Northern Forest region, which includes New Hampshire, Maine, Vermont and New York.

    Building not ready but business starts for joint partnership in Plymouth

    July 25th, 2013 by Lynn

      By DAN SEUFERT
      Union Leader Correspondent

      The Enterprise Center at Plymouth, a local business incubator and accelerator at 149 Main St., will be ready for occupancy in the fall. The center is a partnership between Plymouth State University and the Grafton County Economic Development Council. (COURTESY)

      PLYMOUTH — The Enterprise Center at Plymouth, a local business incubator and accelerator, has already started doing business, though its new building will not be ready until fall.

      The center is a partnership between Plymouth State University and the Grafton County Economic Development Council that was established last year to create new businesses and jobs in the greater Plymouth area. It moves into its newly renovated building at 149 Main St. in September, said ECP Executive Director Michael Tentnowski.

      But through its “virtual” presence prior to the renovation completion, the center has already held a local business advisory session this summer at which 200 area entrepreneurs were present, Tentnowski said, and it’s signed on three member businesses that will occupy 75 percent of the building’s 10,000 square feet of space.

      The center is currently a one-man operation run by Tentnowski but will soon hire a part-time staff member, with PSU student interns and area volunteers helping. The center is meant to support entrepreneurship, small businesses, and economic development in the area by providing services, including leased space, mentoring, and networking — to new and existing businesses.

      “I think of it as a one-stop shopping opportunity for entrepreneurial activity in central New Hampshire,” Tentnowski said.

      The county council is providing the physical location and building, using $2 million in federal, state and corporate funding for the building and the renovation. The building had been a site of a bagel restaurant.

      PSU is providing the incubator with staffing through the use of interns from business, computer science and other academic programs at the university. It is also providing intellectual capital in the form of consulting and advising services with the help of PSU professors of business and other fields.

      “In return, many of these businesses hire the university’s interns or other area companies hire them, so it’s a great situation,” Tentnowski said.

      The ECP will keep an office in the building, which has room for up to 12 more member tenants, depending on how many employees come with each new business. The ECP office includes a sales skills development video production room and space dedicated to professional focus group services.

      Among the new businesses is TotalScope Marketing LLC, whose owner, Mark LaClair, had been running his business out of his Plymouth home for the past six years. He hopes to hire three to four employees this year, and plans to make use of PSU interns.

      “The business support they’ve given us and we’re getting in the new building will help us grow to the next level,” LaClair said. “The resources we gain access to, the interns and the academic staff of the university, are tremendous.”

      Another member tenant is Narrative1 Software, whose owner, Tom Armstrong, is bringing his business and its 12 employees to the new building from the business’ home of the last nine years in Holderness in great part because of the new connection to PSU.

      “The collaboration with the university is a big deal for us,” Armstrong said. “The input from the faculty and the interns will help our business.”

      The ECP is planning a grand opening ceremony for the building on Oct. 15.

      dseufert@newstote.com


      Incubator fueling Plymouth’s economic renewal

      November 18th, 2012 by Heather

         

         

         

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