Stress Management

April 13th, 2010 by Noelle

What is stress?

Stress is a feeling that’s created when we react to particular events. It’s the body’s way of rising to a challenge and preparing to meet a tough situation with focus, strength, stamina, and heightened alertness.

The events that provoke stress are called stressors, and they cover a whole range of situations – everything from outright physical danger to making a class presentation or taking a semester’s worth of your toughest subject.

Signs of Stress Overload

  • People who are experiencing stress overload may notice some of the following signs:
  • anxiety or panic attacks
  • a feeling of being constantly pressured, hassled, and hurried
  • irritability and moodiness
  • physical symptoms, such as stomach problems, headaches, or even chest pain
  • allergic reactions, such as eczema or asthma
  • problems sleeping
  • drinking too much, smoking, overeating, or doing drugs
  • sadness or depression

Everyone experiences stress a little differently. Some people become angry and act out their stress or take it out on others. Some people internalize it and develop eating disorders or substance abuse problems. And some people who have a chronic illness may find that the symptoms of their illness flare up under an overload of stress.

Keep Stress Under Control

What can you do to deal with stress overload or, better yet, to avoid it in the first place? The most helpful method of dealing with stress is learning how to manage the stress that comes along with any new challenge, good or bad. Stress-management skills work best when they’re used regularly, not just when the pressure’s on. Knowing how to “de-stress” and doing it when things are relatively calm can help you get through challenging circumstances that may arise. Here are some things that can help keep stress under control.

  • Take a stand against overscheduling. If you’re feeling stretched, consider cutting out an activity or two, opting for just the ones that are most important to you.
  • Be realistic. Don’t try to be perfect – no one is. And expecting others to be perfect can add to your stress level, too (not to mention put a lot of pressure on them!). If you need help on something, like schoolwork, ask for it.
  • Get a good night’s sleep. Getting enough sleep helps keep your body and mind in top shape, making you better equipped to deal with any negative stressors.
  • Learn to relax. The body’s natural antidote to stress is called the relaxation response. It’s your body’s opposite of stress, and it creates a sense of well-being and calm. The chemical benefits of the relaxation response can be activated simply by relaxing. You can help trigger the relaxation response by learning simple breathing exercises and then using them when you’re caught up in stressful situations.stress
  • Treat your body well. Experts agree that getting regular exercise helps people manage stress. (Excessive or compulsive exercise can contribute to stress, though, so as in all things, use moderation.) And eat well to help your body get the right fuel to function at its best. It’s easy when you’re stressed out to eat on the run or eat junk food or fast food. But under stressful conditions, the body needs its vitamins and minerals more than ever. Some people may turn to substance abuse as a way to ease tension. Although alcohol or drugs may seem to lift the stress temporarily, relying on them to cope with stress actually promotes more stress because it wears down the body’s ability to bounce back.
  • Watch what you’re thinking. Your outlook, attitude, and thoughts influence the way you see things. Is your cup half full or half empty? A healthy dose of optimism can help you make the best of stressful circumstances. Even if you’re out of practice, or tend to be a bit of a pessimist, everyone can learn to think more optimistically and reap the benefits.
  • Solve the little problems. Learning to solve everyday problems can give you a sense of control. But avoiding them can leave you feeling like you have little control and that just adds to stress. Develop skills to calmly look at a problem, figure out options, and take some action toward a solution. Feeling capable of solving little problems builds the inner confidence to move on to life’s bigger ones – and it and can serve you well in times of stress.

Help & Where to Find It!

The Wellness Center can offer you the following to help relieve your stress:

Time Management Skills

Money Management Skills

Relaxation

Exercise Programs

Healthy Eating Tips

A person to listen

Resources
University of Alberta Health Centre

AIDS& HIV

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HIV InSite

HIV/AIDS Treatment Information Service

UNAIDS

Gay Men’s Health Crisis

CDC: Center’s for Disease Control

Depression

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National Mental Health Association

Alcohol and Drug Abuse

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National Clearinghouse for Alcohol and Drug Information

National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

National Institute on Drug Abuse

ClubDrugs.org

AlcoholScreening.org

SteroidAbuse.org

Asthma

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MyAsthma.com

American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology

Environmental Conservation

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Audubon Society of NH

Squam Lakes Association

Appalachian Trail Conference

Appalachian Mountain Club

Society for the Protection of NH Forests

Smoking

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QuitNet

American Cancer Society

National Cancer Institute

Tobacco Free U

The Stop Smoking Center

The Tobacco Technical Assistance Consortium (TTAC)

Body Image

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Something Fishy

Cancer

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National Cancer Institute

Cancereducation.com

Cancerfacts.com

American Cancer Society

BreastCancer.org

Conjunctivitis

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Conjunctivitis Information

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