Spring 2014 Hours:

M, T, W       9am-9pm

Th, F             9am-5pm

Sunday        6pm-9pm

To schedule an appointment, email Jane Weber: jlweber@plymouth.edu

To meet in person or online with our graduate writing assistant, email                   Ryan Aquilina: rsrogers04@plymouth. edu

Please note: Telephone messages are only checked on weekdays.

 

 

Advice for Revising Research Papers

Ask yourself these questions as you read over the first draft of your paper. The answers to most of these questions can be found by reading your first draft out loud.

  1. What point do I want to make in the paper? What is my major reason for writing it?
  2. Have I said clearly the thing I want most to say?
  3. What information does not contribute directly to my main point(s)?
  4. How long must a reader read before knowing what my subject is? Can I get into my subject more quickly than I do?
  5. Have I left muddled sentences in my draft? Can I make sentences clearer?
  6. Should I alter my choice of words—using words which more precisely convey meaning? (Try using a thesaurus.)
  7. Can I simplify sentences, maybe by eliminating some words, e.g. unnecessary adjectives?
  8. Am I guilty of using clichés, tired old expressions that have been used so much that they have lost the power to be vivid? (Examples include “means the world to me” and “would give the shirt off his back.”)
  9. Does my text flow easily from one idea to another?
  10. Is my conclusion adequate? Does is provide a graceful end to my paper?
  11. Is my reference page sufficient when it comes to acknowledging my sources?

Testimonials

Sarah Dubey

“I didn’t want to believe it, but I was getting into my piece of work and enjoyed telling him about my piece of writing.”
- Sarah Dubey

Quotes

quote 7

“Writers write to learn, to explore, to discover, to hear themselves saying what they do not expect to say.”
- Donald Murray