When a Child Becomes Ill at the Center

The staff checks the general health of each child daily.  Children may not come to the Center when they are ill. The Center is not equipped to provide the kind of one-on-one care that sick children require.  Although we make every effort to keep children at the Center during scheduled hours, there are occasions when children become ill and need to be sent home. Children who have a fever, have diarrhea, or who are vomiting and show other signs of illness are not permitted to attend the program and will be sent home.  A child developing a rash will generally be sent home until the nature of the rash is determined.

Parents will be notified if their child becomes ill during the program day.  Parents must make arrangement for sick children to be picked up within the hour.  Every effort will be made to make the child as comfortable as possible while waiting for the parent to arrive.

We will try all possible phone numbers to reach the child’s parents or guardians first.  If we have been unable to reach the family after one-half hour, we will notify the emergency contacts on the list.  If the situation is an emergency, this will happen immediately.

In cases where parents share custody, we will need clear instructions as to which parent or designated contact person to call in case of an illness or emergency.

The decision to send a child home because of illness is not taken lightly at the Center. Staff members have children of their own and know first-hand of the inconvenience of having to leave work if a child is ill.  We ask you to understand that your child will be sent home only if we consider it absolutely necessary.  We appreciate your cooperation in responding to our calls and arriving promptly to pick up your sick child.

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