Children with Special Needs

Children who have an Individual Family Service Plan (IFSP) or an Individual Education Plan (IEP) are able to receive services at the Center through their service provider.   The Center does not have qualified service providers (speech pathologists, occupational therapists, etc.) on staff, but we work collaboratively with Early Intervention and local school Preschool Assist programs to be sure that your child’s goals are met.    Your child’s teacher and the director become a part of the child’s team, along with the service providers, and offer information and data, suggestions for writing of IFSP and IEP goals, and act as an advocate for the child.

Teachers at the Center are highly trained in the development of young children and complete informal assessments (please see Assessment section below) on each child as part of our curriculum and program planning process.  If we become concerned about a child’s development, we will document our concerns and share these with the family.  We will work with the family and connect them with the appropriate programs that will complete formal assessments and observations to make a definitive determination.  We will work collaboratively with such programs during this time and act as an advocate for the child.

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