Children’s Health

Children attending the program are expected to be able to participate comfortably in all components of the day, both indoors and outdoors. The general rule is that if a child is well enough to come to the Center, he/she is well enough to go outside; HOWEVER, exceptions to that rule are made in cases where families or teachers have good reasons for not wanting a child to go outside that day (for example, in the case of a child with weather-triggered asthma).

When A Child Becomes Ill at the Center

If you suspect that a child is ill, please notify the teacher in the classroom at once. Only the teacher should take the responsibility of calling a family to send a child home.

Allergies

Some children at the Center have allergies and cannot eat certain foods. Families have documented this information on their child’s entrance forms. Please make sure you are familiar with any dietary restrictions.

Some children and staff members are allergic to various perfumes, hairsprays, and air fresheners. Please use these items sparingly, if at all, at the Center.

It is Center policy that lotions and sprays—such as diaper rash ointment, insect repellent, or sunscreen—can only be applied if the item has been sent in by the child’s family and is labeled with the child’s name. Many children are allergic to these items. For that reason, these items should only be applied by regular staff (not students), and the child’s reaction to the lotion or spray should be carefully monitored.

Children’s Comfort

Be as sensitive as possible to children’s comfort level, indoors and outdoors. In general, Center policy is to have the children wear the indoor and outdoor clothing that was sent in with them by their parents that morning; HOWEVER, teachers must use their judgment to decide whether the child’s clothing is appropriate for prevailing weather conditions. Please be especially sensitive to this during our New England falls and springs, when mornings may be much cooler than the afternoon.

Please be sure that children drink plenty of fluids, all day, indoors and out. Water should always be available to the children.

Medications

As stated in the Family Handbook, only prescription medication can be administered at the Center, and only with signed permission from the family. It is Center policy that we do not administer non-prescription drugs or medication to children.

Only the professional staff may administer medication to children.

 

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