Communication with Families

  • Introduce yourself. Smile and be friendly. Wear a nametag.
  • Try to attend open houses, family meetings, and social events as another way of getting to know families.
  • Discuss something positive that happened during the day about their child. Share  positive anecdotes about their child. These can be written as well as verbal.
  • The discussion of children’s issues, accidents or difficult times is the responsibility of the professional staff. Please refer parents to supervising teachers if they have questions or concerns.
  • Be cordial and communicate with all families. Keep trying! Don’t give up – parents are people too; some are shy, some are outgoing, and some are in between – just like you.

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