Guidelines for University Students in the CD&FC

  • All adult conversation will be pertinent to your work with the children. Please avoid socializing. Direct your attention to the children.
  • Conversation about children happens in seminar and meetings with your team only. While with children, talk to them, not about them! You should only talk about the children with your teaching team, not with people outside the Center.
  • There is no chewing gum, food or beverages allowed in the classroom (except water or if you are here for lunch time).
  • Please avoid the use of perfumes, scented oils, aftershaves, etc.
  • Arrive Promptly.
  • If you will be absent, call the Center as soon as you know you will not make your regular shift.
  • Be a participant observer. Be involved with children and be observant of what is going on throughout the program. Sit on the floor or chairs. Tables and other furniture are for children’s activities.
  • Always wear your nametag while in the Center.

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