Video Watching

Videos should only be shown to children to supplement the curriculum and must be approved by the cooperating teacher.

When showing a video, follow these guidelines:

  • Do not show a video you have not already seen.
  • Leave some lights on in the room. Watching a television screen in a dark room is not good for children’s eyes
  • Do not insist on absolute silence, and do not constantly shush the children or allow them to shush each other. Research shows that children derive the most benefit from television programs and videos if an adult watches with them and discusses the content with them while they are viewing or immediately after.
  • Other activities, such as table blocks, puzzles, or art materials, must be available in the classroom where the video is being shown, so that children who do not care to watch may choose to do something else. These other activities should be supervised.
  • Staff members and students should be with the children while videos are being shown, either watching the video or supervising other activities. They should not be chatting or reading.

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