2013 Schedule

Summer 2013 Programs

 

Summer 2013 Camp PSU Programs, now offered at no cost to the public! Check out our schedule and register today!


June 21        The Ice Age, Glaciers, and Landforms in the White Mountain Region
Bryon Middlekauff
9:00 am-4:00 pm

Have you ever wondered why the local landscape looks the way it does, and what forces have shaped the land we know today?  Join Bryon Middlekauff on a journey through the Plymouth and Rumney area to find out!  Learn about the Ice Age and Glacial Processes in the classroom, then go out in the field to discover evidence for the former presence of the giant ice mass in the Plymouth and Rumney area.

This will be a rain or shine activity. Participants should wear sturdy shoes, and bring rainwear, bug spray, and water.

July 19       Weather and Climate of the High Elevations of the White Mountains- RESCHEDULED FOR AUG 16TH!!
Eric Hoffman
9:00 am-4:00 pm

Do you ever wonder why the weather at the top of the mountain is different from the bottom? Why is it colder, windier, and cloudier up there?  Why are the trees a different species, shorter and shaped differently?

If you are interested in exploring the answers to these questions and others, join Camp PSU for a hands-on learning experience. The day will begin with an introduction to basic mountain weather concepts, the opportunity to learn to use a hand-held weather station, and a visit to the weather lab at PSU. Here participants will be able to explore computer visualizations of real-time weather data in New England.  Participants will then travel to beautiful Franconia Notch State Park in the heart of the White Mountains and ride the Cannon Tramway to the summit (4080’) of Cannon Mountain.  At the top, participants will make measurements of temperature, wind speed and direction, and humidity and compare them to measurements made at lower elevations. Participants will also have some time to explore the trails in the vicinity of the summit and observe evidence of the weather and climate at this elevation.

July 26         Telling Stories: Sharing Memories of the Past for the Future
Linda Upham-Bornstein
9:00 am-3:00 pm

We are all bearers of family stories and community traditions.  These are precious legacies, living traditions, and a vital part of everyday life.  By documenting these “stories,” the past is brought to life in the present and preserved for the future.  As Documentary Studies Professor Thomas Ranking stated, “out of shared telling and remembering grow identity, connection, pride, binding people to place and to one another.”  The Camp PSU “Telling Stories” program is divided into two parts.  In the morning, the campers will learn how to conduct interviews and then interview a grandparent, parent or friend.  The stories will be recorded and available to take home that day.  In the afternoon, we will play a game of “fact or fiction” by creating stories based on unusual images, and interesting artifacts from our collections.

 

Aug. 2        Lessons From Ossipee Park

David Leuser

9:00am -4:00pm

Did middle class Americans in the 19th century view the world differently?  Were they happier than we are today?  These questions and others will be explored in an interactive workshop reviewing the history of Ossipee Mountain Park (now Castle in the Clouds) in Moultonboro, NH, and will culminate in a visit to the beautiful waterfalls, trails, and lake and mountain views that accounted for the Parks’ popularity over 100 years ago.  The workshop will begin with an image based classroom presentation of various engraved, photographic and postcard images depicting the development of Ossipee Mountain Park as a White Mountain tourist attraction.  In this context, a set of four themes will be presented linking cultural and intellectual concepts and beliefs from the Victorian Era to principles and research findings from modern science.  The themes of Culture and Art, Health and Nature, Happiness, Willpower, and Spirituality, and finally, Success and Community will be presented as manifestations of people’s behavior interacting with the land known as Ossipee Mountain Park.  The visit to the actual site of the Park will demonstrate both physically and emotionally the basis for these themes as experienced by tourists then and now.

This will be a rain or shine activity.  Participants should wear sturdy shoes and bring rainwear, bug spray, and water (as well as a camera for those interested in capturing the beauty of the area).  Lunch will be provided.  For further information about the workshop itself, contact the Professor at davidl@plymouth.edu.


Aug. 9      Trails of the White Mountains: CANCELED!!
Ben Amsden
10:00 am-4:00 pm

Many of us have used New Hampshire’s vast network of hiking trails as a way to get from “point A to point B.”  How often, though, have we stopped to wonder how a trail got there, what it represents, or how it is maintained? We will begin the day with a classroom-based discussion of the history of trails in the region, and then head to the woods for an overview of volunteer activities and maintenance techniques. Come prepared to do a little trail work!

This will be a rain or shine activity. Participants should wear sturdy shoes and outdoor clothing, and bring work gloves, bug spray, and water.

 

August 16th       Weather and Climate of the High Elevations of the White Mountains
Eric Hoffman
9:00 am-4:00 pm

Do you ever wonder why the weather at the top of the mountain is different from the bottom? Why is it colder, windier, and cloudier up there?  Why are the trees a different species, shorter and shaped differently?

If you are interested in exploring the answers to these questions and others, join Camp PSU for a hands-on learning experience. The day will begin with an introduction to basic mountain weather concepts, the opportunity to learn to use a hand-held weather station, and a visit to the weather lab at PSU. Here participants will be able to explore computer visualizations of real-time weather data in New England.  Participants will then travel to beautiful Franconia Notch State Park in the heart of the White Mountains and ride the Cannon Tramway to the summit (4080’) of Cannon Mountain.  At the top, participants will make measurements of temperature, wind speed and direction, and humidity and compare them to measurements made at lower elevations. Participants will also have some time to explore the trails in the vicinity of the summit and observe evidence of the weather and climate at this elevation.