Constitution Day

Constitution Day became a national observance in 2004, when Senator Robert Byrd passed a bill designating September 17 as the day for citizens to commemorate the signing in 1787 of the U.S. Constitution and to learn more about our founding document. Senator Byrd once said, “Our ideals of freedom, set forth and realized in our Constitution, are our greatest export to the world.” He added the Constitution Day clause to his 2004 federal spending bill because he believed that all citizens should know about their rights as outlined in the Constitution.

PSU is proud to acknowledge how the events of September 17th have shaped and continue to shape our country’s history. You can learn more about Constitution Day at the following link:

http://www.constitutionday.com

Can you pass a U.S. Citizenship test?

America’s Founding Documents – National Archives

Fascination Facts about the U.S. Constitution

Here are a few that we thought were interesting.

What to see more click here.

The U.S. Constitution has 4,400 words. It is the oldest and shortest written Constitution of any major government in the world.

Of the spelling errors in the Constitution, “Pensylvania” above the signers’ names is probably the most glaring.

The oldest person to sign the Constitution was Benjamin Franklin (81). The youngest was Jonathan Dayton of New Jersey (26).

When the Constitution was signed, the United States population was 4 million. It is now more than 327 million. Philadelphia was the nation’s largest city, with 40,000 inhabitants.

A proclamation by President George Washington and a congressional resolution established the first national Thanksgiving Day on November 26, 1789. The reason for the holiday was to give “thanks” for the new Constitution.